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Chicago

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Everything posted by Chicago

  1. A topic never mentioned as far as the Page/ Plant relationship that went afoul. Did Page feel any resentment toward Robert Plant about Scarlett Page potentially being killed in the accident in Greece? Just because Jimmy doesn't write the lyrics how does anyone know how he felt about that situation.
  2. My feeling is that for Jimmy Page there is no more JOY in recording new music or touring. There are no musical challenges to be pursued that would warrant the stresses and strains of being told you're not as good as you once were ; asked redundant questions about Crowley, Lori, drug abuse, why did you rip off Stairway and other accusations of plagiarism. Let alone the temptations and depleting effects of touring. Read about Elvis Presley or Roy Orbison at the end of their careers. Roy was overworked to death and Elvis just self immolated. The music business is a killer Jimmy Page gave up that lifestyle to survive. I'm happy for him.
  3. This is the last in a 4-part retrospective series of Led Zeppelin shows I witnessed in April 1977. The final night of Zeppelin's stay in Chicago lands on Easter Sunday, 4/10/77. As a good Catholic boy I attend mass Sunday morning. I had witnessed Jimmy Page fall ill just hours before , which led to the cancellation of Zeppelin's Saturday concert.. What a dichotomy! I spend my prayer time wondering if Jimmy will make it for tonight's show. The extra Hail Mary's pay off as the news is Jimmy's fit and ready to play. Saving the best for last, my seats this evening are Box seats 1st row, even with 18th row Main Floor. Because of our seats, a friend of ours lent us his 8mm film camera. The footage that exists of that night was shot by us. As we go to our seats I revel in our good fortune to be so close. The only drawback is that there are a couple disco boys next to us who seem ill-at-ease. The show begins promptly by Zeppelin standards. The weather has warmed up and so has the playing. It's evident the minute it goes dark and a mixture of euphoria and flashbulbs engulf the Chicago Stadium. The initial spotlight pinpoints Robert, but astride him is Page in a dark outfit. One note introduces The Song Remains The Same and a blast of light and sound jolt you with every chord accent. My God Almighty! Jimmy Page is dressed in Nazi regalia. Jack boots up to his knees, peaked cap ,black shirt and pants, white scarf, sunglasses and a smoke. Too Fucking much! Happy Easter Jimmy! On top of that he was playing like a demon. All the breaks are executed with conviction. The Rover is spot on leading into Sick Again. Bonzo hammers it out against Page's slurred and bluesy overbends. Robert mentions Saturday's fiasco stating " Jimmy was rather ill last night. It was only a false pregnancy." Nobody's Fault But Mine features a fine harmonica solo by Plant which is similar to the Presence version. I'm very close to Jimmy and with the apparel he's wearing tonight his guitar does resemble a machine gun. Especially during his rapid-fire and galvanizing solo. As I observe Jimmy's physique, I notice his arms are bone- thin. Against his black outfit he appeared ghoulishly pale. In My Time Of Dying is added back to the set tonight and it really kicks ass! I see Jimmy dig into his pants pocket to retrieve his slide and is brought out his Danelectro. Robert treats us to some Chicago blues history before the song's start. Zeppelin really gel on this one tonight. Jones and Bonham work like a machine, providing the muscle. Robert and Jimmy flying high outfront! Robert lauds Willie Dixon to the fan's puzzlement. Most not knowing who the hell he is. Page plays a mesmerizing version of Since I've Been Loving You in honor of his blues forefathers. Sheets of notes blend with sustained cries. Yes Sir! Dry ice billows from the front of the stage as Jonesy does his thing to initiate No Quarter. Wah-Wah and kick drum, Page and Bonham put the pedal to the metal. Robert is spartan in his phrasing and clear, singing powerfully. As JPJ switches to the piano, Page unleashes an enormous tidal wave of sound from his theramin! Jonesy plays a refined and tasty sounding solo, which leads into a rock and roll 50's boogie with Jimmy and Bonzo. Pagey has reappeared from the shadows donning a white fedora. One minute he's in the SS, the next in the Mafia. The guy understands theater.The main improv begins and there's a languid soulfullness to the feel of it, until Jimmy charges it up with some fast and flash playing which leads to Page breaking his high E strung. Jimmy throws up both hands in disgust, taking a second to regroup and proceded to play a totally different solo. Great playing Jimmy! A series of viscious wah wah licks conclude the song. Robert speaks of light and shade in describing the reasons for including Ten Years Gone in their current set list. Plant praises JPJ's versatility in playing guitar and bass foot pedals simultaneously. Page's shimmering notes cut across everything. He is really making amends for last night. Sweeping and beautiful in it's construction and presentation. A Supreme highlight. As the band head to the front for the acoustic routine, Robert derides the local rock radio station for accusing Page of being too wasted to play on Saturday. Covering for Jimmy he states, " Jimmy doesn't drink, smoke or take women while on tour. So an apology would be nice with a crate of the same alcohol!' Battle of Evermore is played splendily with dynamism. Going To California provides a soothing and calming effect. And it sounds great too! The acoustic set really emphasizes Robert's abilities. Robert keeps hinting at Elvis Presley's Surrender. Not tonight. Black Country Woman revs up the crowd and Robert puts on a railroad engineer's cap that a fan has thrown on stage. Page leads the band into his acoustic tour-de-force Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp. With fingers flying and thumb-pick rolling Page plays a gem of a solo. Robert shouts " Strider! " to wrap it up. Without introduction JPJ plunks out the opening clavinet lick of Trampled Under Foot. It had been played opening night as an encore. But tonight, it's very effective after the subtler acoustic segment. This song is rip-roaring rock and roll. I love it as Page marches around in lockstep with Bonzo's drum madness! Multi-colored light beams spinning upward from a rotating device behind Jonesy. The middle section features Jimmy in guitar god mode. Sound, structure and intensity meld as one. The peak is attained as Page and Plant perform their Push! Push! climax. This is my personal highlight of the concert. The exotic White Summer changes the mood entirely. Hunched over his wooden chair, Jimmy seduces clean and resonant melodies from his black and white Danelectro. I now knew Kashmir was next. Page played his cue and turned back at Bonham. Right as Kashmir began Jimmy stood up and kicked his chair back with the heal of his boot. Kashmir sounded so immense and was pure magic, played without error. Robert comments about how good it's sounding tonight and contributes it to " the hats we've been wearing!" Over the Top has Robert referring to Bonham as " The man I call my Brother." John Bonham never failed to deliver the goods and the same could be said tonight. He tore into it with passion and fury, never losing the crowd. What a gifted musician. After the drum solo Page reappears in his white satin poppy suit. To the cleaners with the SS gear! Jimmy's harmonized sound experiments and theramin swoops lead into a edgy and creepy violin bow spectacle. Being so close to Page in his swirling laser pyramid gave you a palpable chill. He had shredded the horsehair off his bow. The image of Page dredging up otherworldly shrieks while Bonzo pummeled his tympani is unforgettable. To myself I had privately hoped they would launch into Dazed and Confused. But as the set had already been established it was again Achilles Last Stand. It sounded tighter and more assured this evening. Nice improvement. Stairway To Heaven finishes the main set. It is given a heartfelt rendering and is enjoyed thoroughly by the crowd. Page's Spanish guitar influence is apparent in his solo. Bonzo and Jonesy keep driving it mantra -like. Robert leads the song to it's conclusion. The band members walk out front and acknowledge the crowd before going backstage. The wait for their return was long. I could tell the crowd was getting a little restless and some were leaving. Now becoming routine, the encore was again Rock and Roll. Explosions and light flashes were strategically employed. The sound of this version is loud and nasty. A fitting conclusion. One last blast of drum rolls from Bonzo , a final crashing guitar chord and that was it . All over. As they left the stage that night it would be my final glimpse at Led Zeppelin. I gratefully thank Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham for enhancing my life and so many others in this world. God Bless You.
  4. Hi Porgie66,

    Watching the video you posted, it was interesting to see some of the other musical projects you're doing. High level musicianship.

    I'm a guitarist/ composer also playing out in the Chicago area. I play a variety of styles, but at this time the band I'm playing with is more Latin and classic rock and pop emphasis. Lots of percussion. It's fun for me because of just playing Santana -type material note for note, I throw in some Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck licks with these Latin cats that aren't as familiar with the Zeppelin material 😎

    If you're up for getting out I'm doing a Cinco de Mayo gig at Shanahan's in Woodridge on May 5th and the following night  May 6th at Homers  on 47th st. And Racine in Chicago

    Thanks.... Joe Schmidt

    1. Show previous comments  9 more
    2. Chicago

      Chicago

      Had a great time. Just got outside a lot and recharged my batteries. 

      Resting up from a hot gig last night. It was locked in. Getting ready for round 2 tonight🎸🎶 how was your show last night? 

      take care...Joe

    3. porgie66

      porgie66

      That's great. Always good to get a change of scenery and pace. Are you still in FL?

      I read your recollections of the 77 shows and really enjoyed them. very vividly detailed to the point where I almost felt like I was there! As much as I don't prefer the 77 era shows as far as repeated listening, I know it was a mind blowing experience to feel that energy and see them live. It's mainly because of Page's erratic playing on that tour, but I also feel like they weren't as free wheeling somehow even though the solos are longer and the songs were longer. Seemed like the epic scale and excesses took the place of the musical substance and improvisatory magic they had in the early years. I even feel that way about a lot of the playing in 75 , though on the Forum boards people are in adulation of 75 and 77. To me , their peak , performance wise was 73. Really 71 -72 were just monstrous. They way Page , Jones and Bonzo played off each other, and Page's ideas and execution just on fire. 

      Gigs went well, had a great weekend at the Green Mill with this pianist Bill Carrothers who is a monster. I have a concert coming up in a couple weeks at The Studebaker Theater downtown with a great big band I play with here , The Chicago jazz Orchestra. It's a tribute to Dizzy Gillespie , in honor of his 100 bday and we are playing his music with the great trumpeter Roy Hargrove. If you're not familiar with him, he's a premier player. It should be a really nice show. Old charts from the 40's and 50's that are a motherfucker, so I gotta focus on these tunes!  Such great music, ahead of its day rhythmically and harmonically. I used to play with Ray Brown, the great bassist and he was in Dizzy's band when he was 18. Pretty wild to think. 

      You're on my email list now so any time you feel like coming to a show, let me know.  I'll be at the Grand Geneva next Friday too ...FYI. 

       

      best,

      George

       

       

    4. Chicago

      Chicago

      Ive been back home for a week. I played Friday and Saturday. Great crowd response and I had a blast. Leaving the club at 2:30 yesterday morning from the Back of the Yards area - the big black doorman said - " Man! That was like Jimi Hendrix !"

      Thanks for putting in the time to read my Zeppelin write ups. I'm in agreement about the 1977 tour as far as the playing goes. Jimmy was the determining factor in how their performance would turn out and his playing was really disjointed that year. He moved great and looked cool though. I was an athlete at the time and I was amazed at how skinny his arms were.

      My wife was at the infamous Orlando, August 31, 1971 Led Zeppelin concert. She still has the ticket stub. Different era different energy.

      I'm aware of Ray Brown and Roy Hargrove. Top notch cats. Advanced shit for sure 🎺🎻 I'm gonna try and get out to one of your shows with my wife.

      Keep working hard on that repertoire!

      Joe 

  5. We'll written overview with which I greatly agree. Such a variety in their compositions and musical approachs. You're right in including I Will on your list. It's a glorious song.
  6. Tasty stuff Bluecongo. Good luck with your upcoming CD
  7. Great playing, style and sound
  8. This photo is from the book Tangents Within A Framework. It says it's from 1982 , Jimmy talking to a Japanese journalist. Must be Deathwish 2 related.
  9. Depends which of Jeff's personalities is talking - " Jimmy was very good. Good thrashing bass sound - but I knew it would work out that he'd become lead."
  10. "What's that man movin' cross the stage? It looks a lot like the one used by Jimmy Page... You've got rock and roll at the Hollywood Bowl" Will Jimmy Page jam with Jeff Beck tonight?
  11. I bought the 4-record set of the April 28th show for $ 40 all the way back in April of 1978. Purchased it at Rolling Stone records on Washington St. In Chicago. I've played that awesome show so many times there are no grooves left . Happily threadbare!
  12. Some of my older musician friends were at these early Kinetic Playground shows. I asked one what he remembered about the gig and he responded - "Hair! All I saw was hair flying around with no faces!"
  13. The worst concert I ever saw in my life was Keith Richards and The New Barbarians in the spring of 1979. Utter filth. They were over an hour late, fucked up beyond belief and could barely play.
  14. Common procedure if you don't want to be sued for slander. Page is no different than other personalities in that regard. There's nothing in it for Jimmy to write an autobiography, or maybe he can write one in the Keith Richards style and discuss the size of his lead singer's cock.
  15. I always thought the guy in the photo was Michael Monarch from the band Detective.
  16. Hi Deborah J. Hope you have an enjoyable Holiday season!
  17. Notice Plant's use of the term "subtle blend" at 15:40 characterizing Jimmy Page. That phrase is attributed to Benji Lefevre in reference to Page's mixing of coke and heroin. Robert must have thought no one would get what that meant.
  18. Very sly answers from Robert.
  19. Robbie Blunt didn't make those comments about Page's playing. It was Frances Dunnery who played with Robert during the Fate Of Nations era.
  20. Washed Up, Hung Up or Batter Up. Let's see what Page is promoting a year from now. By not being a road dog, the most interest is in seeing Jimmy Page play live again. If he's inspired he's going to do it.
  21. So what. Solo albums or group albums. Only time will tell. I'd rather encourage the guy to play again that fold my arms and say he's washed up. That's lazy and negative.
  22. 5 hours of practice / 6 days a week for 6 weeks and you will tear heads off. That's prior to rehearsing with fellow musicians. No one can say for sure Page hasn't been playing his guitar. I think he enjoys massaging the truth.
  23. Q: When you came out of retirement, was it difficult for you to get your chops back? Les Paul: I was desperate, but I still didn't scramble. I guess I just leaned more on what was in my mind than what was in my chops. I learned a long time ago that one note can go a long way if it's the right one, and it will probably whip the guy with 20 notes. With 20 notes he's got a lot of problems. My chops were not as fast as when I was a kid; things that were done a certain way before were harder to do when I came out of retirement. But then the speed came back. Chops come back, and you don't worry about them. I think the most important thing about playing is to walk out with confidence and look the people in the eye and say, "Here I am," and go and do your thing. I'm in alignment with Les Paul's actual experience of getting back to playing live gigs. Do you really think Jimmy Page doesn't know how to prepare for live gigs?