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Dane1968

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Everything posted by Dane1968

  1. What?? I think I stated pretty clearly that the drums overall sound great, compared to other produced drum sounds. Maybe you have been sniffing something that fogged up your glasses. You wanna share some? Totally missed the point, or am I missing your point? Bonham himself was not always pleased with his recorded sound. Just forget it and move on, I have. So not every album is masterfully produced, so what. The world continues.
  2. I am going to do some very long posts. Album by album. I accept I may initially be called a pretentious wanker but it is only my opinion here and nothing to get upset about if you consider yourself to be a rational adult. Curious? Hopefully it will make sense when you consider the total sum. Take some time to consider before responding and try not to be instantly biased or defensive. Several things can influence a listener in music: The quality of the song, and the quality of the recording of those songs. Maybe this is only for the audiophiles, but there are many instances where sound can subconsciously influence the listener. I've heard many average songs which sonically sounded great, and many great songs which sounded like shit. I don't think I can deal with a great song that sounds like it was recorded on a five dollar tape recorder. Quite frankly, the sound quality of songs recorded con-temporarily is pretty horrendous, with extreme amounts of compression that physically hurt my ears. I find it staggering that with the technology available today, music sounds like it does compared to the 70's recordings. I do not think it is the whole CD v Vinyl debate, it is the raw recording to final stereo mixing to praise/blame. Just remember that when CD's were new, circa 1985, everyone was blown away at the improvement in sound quality. And now everyone wants to go back to vinyl - IMO it's not the format, it is the current mixing to blame. I don't want to go back to scratchy vinyl, no, just get the current mixing and mastering right. Not everyone listens with $15 ear-buds in an iPhone, some people still have stereo's with speakers in quality wooden cabinets. The overall impression I get is a Zeppelin album sounds like you're in the room listening as a band plays mostly live. Modern recordings are so processed. It is as though older records capture a song being played, modern stuff is creating a song in the studio bit by bit.
  3. Thanks, that must be it. Probably got some youtube stuff mixed up. Must have been a great night for you, you lucky bastard! (said with respect of course.) Would have been equally exhilarating and sad for Jason to play along with his father, if not actually in person. Is there, or would there be, any official release of such event? Probably not.
  4. I borrowed the DVD for 02 years ago from the local library. I am certain it had an extras section that had Jason playing along to a video projection of Moby Dick from Madison Square Gardens. I have never been able to find the concert DVD again with this in it. Don't know if it was a special edition or what, does the current release have this bit deleted, or have I mistaken it from something else? Maybe the Australian release was edited? Thanks.
  5. In Through The Out Door: SOUND: This is a nicely recorded album, mostly, if not well mixed. The guitar is too low, the keyboards are very late 70's early 80's sounding, but they did not have hindsight nor the benefit of years of later scrutiny. Vocals are indistinct at times. It is easy to pick the shit out of something many years later but I would think they did the best they could with what they had. However, you can almost get a hint of what would be the (sadly) future of drum sounds with the added reverb and maybe some delay, which would eventually lead to that horrendous and unnatural Phil Collins 80's gated, processed-to-the-shit drum sound which every band after just had to had. Whether that is a good or bad thing, well, I think it was bad but the masses seemed to love it. SONGS:By this point in retrospective musical history Zeppelin was done. This has some great songs, they just don't sound so great. Where could they go? They would have had the choice of being: A: one of those 'new wave dance bands' led by questionable makeup-laden men with fluffy mullets, chunky bass lines, sparse guitar, processed drums, and synth driven songs singing about being bi-sexual (not that there is anything wrong), or: B: being a 'new wave of British metal' band such as Iron Maiden and the forthcoming Metallica. Zeppelin would not have fitted in and would have become an aging dinosaur band. At this point if you were over 27 years of age you were obsolete. The sixties were over, the seventies were seen as indulgent excessive musicianship with overblown guitar and drum solos. Jimmy's relative lack of success in the 80's with The Firm et al shows this. Note that all these bands were 'new…' something or another. Zeppelin were considered very old by now, and musical ability counted for nothing if you did not look good in tights and makeup. Taken for an individual album I really like this. If it is compared to their sixties or early seventies work it is markedly different which I think puts people off. It was an awkward time for music, being not one thing or another. There are still some cool songs on it, maybe not expected Zeppelin songs, but still good songs. All things considered the musicianship is good, as always it has some great bass lines. Carouselambra has a pretty funky bass line that seems to overshadow a great guitar line. By now you'd have to seriously consider whether Zeppelin would have ever gotten anywhere without JPJ. I know Zeppelin was the equal sum of four parts but I think long term they would have been struggling without JPJ. Page and Plant get all the attention but a body is useless without a spine. Coda: I don't want to comment at all on this.
  6. Graffiti: SOUND: Average to very good. Nice separation of each instrument, you can clearly hear what is going on. Drums are good overall, if maybe a touch boxy sounding. Guitars are well defined without excess distortion. Song by song, the guitars can either be very layered, or single guitar tracks. A couple of songs the guitar sounds a touch muffled. For me, the fullness of a song is a combination of all instruments panned and mixed well. There is a ton of great riffs here. If you are a first time Zeppelin listener, this should be your go-to starting point. Not the best ever recording but not to be sneered either. SONGS: Probably my favourite overall collection of songs. Such diversity in styles and yet all unmistakably Zeppelin. Isn't that the mark of a great band? Zeppelin peaked at this time. The songs were becoming more advanced and sophisticated without being pretentious (which they were almost verging on with Presence, almost to the point of being too clever for their own good… more to follow on that) Down By The Seaside is a grower for sure, I didn't know what the hell this country song was doing on a Zeppelin album at first, and now I love it. Boogie With Stu was the same deal. It gets airplay all the time and people can't believe that it is Zeppelin, then you catch them humming it hours later without them realising they are doing it. Ten Years Gone is just the real deal with the Fender and Les Paul combination. Everyone raves about The Rover - good song, a simple song done well. Never been a fan of Kashmir, hey that's just me, as it goes on and on. Kashmir is a landmark song that deserves attention, to which you can decide for yourself. Presence: SOUND: Great, just great f'n sounding album. The guitars are just so right there in your speakers. Great drum sound though could be a touch crisper or brighter on the snare, the bass drum is pumping, just everything overall right on. You blast that on a good stereo and you know it. So will your neighbours. Who wants to be friendly with the neighbors anyway. The best sounding album after IV. If anyone has had the pleasure of being in a big room with a live drum kit, you will know that this is what real drum sounds like. SONGS: One of those love it or don't love it collections of outstanding songs that seem to fit, yet don't fit, in the Zeppelin repertoire. I did mention that they had almost gone too far from the straight out rock songs to somewhere that maybe alienated people. I think Page, Jones and Bonham had grown tremendously as writers and performers by this stage, but their audience had not quite caught up yet and were not ready for this album. From performance view it is just outstanding, but it is so far advanced from the likes of Whole Lotta Love that people could not decide if they dug it or not. At the time it may have been confronting but when you hear it now it seems such an obvious positive growth. An audience likes familiarity but an active musician always likes to grow. Achilles is a good study in how to layer guitar tracks. For the unfamiliar, it is when you have a guitar part, and add another guitar part, and another, and so on - kind of like when you sit in the audience of a classical orchestra and you have 80 different instruments playing and you can still clearly hear each instrument as it is played: the part itself may not be much but the combined total of all instruments equals something massive. When you listen to Presence you will be hearing a four piece orchestra at it's prime.
  7. Houses: SOUND: Terrible sounding album. The guitar is thin with no sustain, the drums at times sound like cardboard boxes, and Robert's voice sounds unnaturally high at times, as if it the tape were speed-ed up. This is odd considering some songs were recorded and then the tape was slowed down a whole step in pitch. I don't get it. But then a few songs sound just great. SONGS: Some standout songs, and a few that have me bewildered. Song Remains is a classic. Song Remains (live): SOUND: For a live recording this is very acceptable. All the instruments are well recorded and separated in the mix. SONGS: You dig the set list or you don't. Celebration Day is a nice inclusion. Moby Dick I could do without as there could have been another song or two in it's place. I am a drummer and I will happily admit that drum solo's are painful after one or two passes - the majority of an audience has no interest.
  8. III: SOUND: Bit of a muddy sounding album at times, then some really nice bright acoustic parts. Immigrant Song is one of the worst sounding, but great songs, I've ever heard - it is so dull sounding guitar wise. It's a great song but the recording sounds like shit. Overall it is an inconsistently recorded collection of songs - that is, good songs that sound like it was the audio engineer's first day on the job and had no idea at all what to do. SONGS: Standouts are Celebration Day, Since I've Been Loving You, and Out On The Tiles. I did not like these songs at all initially. I thought Celebration had some weird digeridoo thing at the start, and then what sounded like a banjo, of all instruments, playing the main A chord jangly riff. I just didn't get it and now it is my favourite of all songs. Great song. I think when I saw a live video, and Jimmy had such a boner while playing it, I thought he must seem to like it for some reason so I gave it a few more listens and then I just got it. Great song. I thought Tiles was odd with the hammer on riff, then realised what a fun and difficult song it was to play, and therefore to listen to. I don't give the acoustic side much of of a spin though. Friends is the worst song I've ever heard. Weird album, with some gems and some duds. I can never decide if this is my favourite album. IV: SOUND: Damn this must be the greatest sounding recording of all time. Just unbelievable for around 1970/71 And over forty years later no producer and engineer have come close. When you are shopping for a new amp or stereo this is what you want to play to test it out on. Or Presence. Remember the film 'Boogie Nights' when the cowboy played some hillbilly hick stuff to make a Hi-Fi sale? This is what he should have played. Loudly. Instant sale. Nothing else to say. SONGS: This has some great songs, but a few are elevated purely by the recorded sound. Misty Mountain Hop is massive here, but falls flat and empty when played live. As with Levee, where the sound far surpasses the song. Biggest drum sound ever, but without that drum sound this song is ordinary. Stairway… perhaps the best ever culmination of songwriting, performance and recording ever. There is a reason it gets played on the radio non stop… and it is great reason.
  9. I: SOUND: A bit ordinary really. Maybe it was cutting edge in late 60's. Drums are present, probably the highlight of the album. Cymbals sound dull and clangy, not typical Paiste's - they were, I guess, Paiste Giant Beat models, not the later 2002 series which are bright and glassy. Drums can have a very subconscious overall result in the complete sound - basically a shitty drum sound will give a shitty album sound. Studio engineers have since learnt this lesson, where previously drums were an afterthought. Listen to any Phil Spector 60's recording, or Beatles, where the drums are so indistinct and degrading, while listen to some Motown where the drums are bright and crisp, it's a world of difference. Guitar is distinct with a Telecaster brightness. Electric Bass is nicely overdriven.., bass is cool and distinct as always. JPJ is a legend. On all future albums the electric bass will be spot on without further need to comment. And it is an electric bass, not a bass guitar. A bass and a guitar are two very different instruments that can look somewhat similar. That is like saying a cat is dog just 'cause they have four legs and are furry / hairy - not the same. It is an insult to bass players to be considered a lesser second rate guitar player with just four strings. Vocals are nice. SONGS: Highlights are Good Times, Your Time is..., and, How many More Times. I've heard Dazed way too many times to make an objective evaluation - great at the time but too much overkill since. Not a fan of the other slow triplet blues songs (I like what I like, you can like what you like, it's nothing to argue about.) II: SOUND: I always find this to be an odd sounding record. It sounds like what it is: different songs recorded at different times in different studios. The end result is that it sounds like a compilation, with variable sounds on each instrument over each song. It does not flow sonically, mainly inconsistent drums, and therefore I seem to listen to it the least. I have always liked albums that capture a band at a particular time. It was done over the same year time period but it always feels disjointed. At the time of release nobody had heard anything quite like it so it became an instant classic. It has some great stereo panning effects going on which blew away all the stoners, which in the 60's was almost everybody. SONGS: Later, maybe. Not my favourite. This has a reputation for being great but there is better.
  10. Year 2000 plus era Iron Maiden. I am not British (I'm Australian) but these guys are currently considered to be the closest thing to rock Gods as far as humanly possible in their homeland. Yes, no? Been going since the late 70's, had their rise, fall, and resurrection. Not a bad effort really considering the expected lifetime of any band. The blokes are thought to be 'diamond geezers' which translates to ... I don't know an equivalent world wide translation - Just damn likeable? - but it is certainly a compliment. I have a problem. I get hooked on a band, listen non stop for six months, get sick of it, go to the next band, and return two years later. My listening roster is, in no order, Zeppelin, Maiden, 80's Metallica, 70's Kiss, Foo Fighters, Deep Purple, Motley Crue (yes, I really do, so what? Tommy Lee is an underrated rock funkster), and various orchestra classical. Yeah I'm getting old but aren't we all. You are now several minutes older since reading this thread. Time can't be stopped but good music is timeless.
  11. Well done LpMan. I work in the printing business. When I am on my death bed with one hour left, what do you think I will care about? It will certainly not be if somebody had their business card printed and delivered a day late. I will care about if I was a good enough father, that I had people that appreciated me for being me, and myself in return, and that I did the best I could and no more than that. Anything else is insignificant. My life is about having 24 hours a day to fill, and doing what I consider worthwhile to fill those hours. I may request a suitable Zeppelin song to be played on my last farewell. What song... mmmm (thinking), maybe Achilles would be suitable?
  12. Very unfortunate about Chris. Early reports indicate it was due to clinical depression, something which many artists' suffer through. Depression / bi-polar is a very real medical condition which many outside people seem to ignore or not believe in until it is too late. It matters little if you live in a mansion or on the street. Everyone has troubles in life, and having money and being popular is not the long term answer. Feelings of self worth become amplified, as does self doubt. You try to please everyone else and end up ignoring your own needs. I have lived with it my whole life and it is mental torture. Why would I tell the world something personal like this? Because society needs to wake up and accept that people are not designed to work 70-hour-weeks, to be stressed out daily, to have everything be perfect, to hide their emotions because it is considered weak, and on and on. I am male and have no concerns about admitting any of this. How many people have to die to realize that life should be enjoyable and not a constantly hard uphill battle. When you need help, ask for it, and if someone asks for help, just listen to them even if you are unable to do any more than just be there for five minutes. Five minutes for a lifetime is not much to ask.
  13. Whether this is relevant ... I consider a musician worth listening to on not how many notes they can play, but the notes they choose to play. Simple enough really considering most audiences' know nothing at all about music except what is pleasant to their ears.
  14. I wouldn't say they changed it. They were doing more or less the same thing as most 70's rock bands, except a hell of a lot better. Music changed dramatically after they were gone - rap etc. Music today is worlds away from Zeppelin, to the detriment of it in my opinion. If anything, they showed us what not to do with a good band - how to ruin it. Of course no one learns and good bands still self-destruct today.
  15. Gave me a laugh. How did you know? Been a bit busy lately doing my duties as the president of the Carpenter's fan club.
  16. Fair enough. Thanks for the info. Yeah it's still possible that he wasn't speaking literally. Probably the only person who truly knows what a lyric means is the person who wrote it.
  17. I met Hugh Jackman and his wife Debra about 17 years ago as they were just walking around the shops in Melbourne. It was no big deal as he was not yet Wolverine. Said hello and some other crap. What are you gonna say really? They're just people. They use toilet paper like everyone else. We still talk on the phone occasionally... No, we don't, that is just a lie. Must be annoying being famous at times, you could not even go to the supermarket to buy a ten-pack of toilet paper without a resulting TMZ story about how you must have the runs. As if the world needs to know that.
  18. You get the old line of 'If money was no object, what would you choose?' Obviously you would search for a priceless treasure. For most people money is an object of concern, however. I am a pretty ordinary player, I just play rhythm, by choice. My preferences would be: Les Paul. With humbuckers gives you a nice fat warm sound. P90's are dirtier but have more clarity. The body shape is very playable. The neck joint is a bit awkward, and they can be weighty. Cost a fortune. Firebird. The most comfortable body to play, but they are neck heavy. Has a real metallic dirty sound, but still bright. People either love 'em or hate 'em. Reasonable cost. Telecaster. A lot of Fender players choose a Strat, but I think a Tele sounds a bit meatier, and the volume knob is not in the way. I have no use for a tremolo. Reasonable cost. Everyone has their own preferences, and if it works for you then what more do you want.
  19. Lindsay Buckingham is F'n great. Rarely gets get regarded as a player, just part of the band. Epiphone guitars are good value if you can't afford the real deal. A few mods for a couple of hundred dollars and you're set. Around 50% or more of all players are realistically bedroom players and don't have the cash or need for a $5000 plus Les Paul. Still, I wouldn't mind... A nice Greco or Burny Japanese model are top notch without the price tag. Can anyone find a pic of English comedian Bill Baily with his 8 neck or whatever guitar... Now that is a guitar to save up for. And a pleasure for your guitar tech to set up and re-string every night.
  20. Yes, but I thought the lyrics were usually a bit more poetic, as it were. They were pretty open about sex and drugs, but usually in a more obscure way, rather than just flat out saying it. Myself I would not want to have lyrics like that. You can say it, but do you really have to say it so obviously. Isn't the art of musical poetry saying what you want to say, without actually saying it. Eg Rock n Roll "Been a long time since I did that stroll..." is not about going for a walk, not with his legs anyway.
  21. A couple of things I have read here and there (no sources as I don't takes notes of everything I read on the off chance I may have to quote it.) Robert has stated that he and Jimmy were musical collaborators, and never personal friends outside of the band, as they had nothing in common. True or not, I don't know. When you're in the middle of something you just see what you can see. When you have a later outside perspective you can be more rational and unemotional. Maybe a bit of the 'old girlfriend / boyfriend' syndrome. It has it's appeal to return to, but you're still going back to the same problems. Jason has copped a lot of flack. His response was that his father was his teacher, so naturally a student will have traits of that teacher, and still his own way of playing. If he mirrored his dad he was just a copy, if he played differently he was criticized for not playing like his father. He couldn't win either way. Poor bastard was never accepted for being himself. That kind of pressure can stop you sleeping at night. A great drummer, just a different type of drummer.
  22. Thanks. I could never understand a word in that song. Had no idea it was a drug song, and that Page would allow those lyrics. I don't care either way, but it seems out of place and too... sleazy or something. Druggies try to hide it, and that seems too blatant.
  23. Really? He was a free spirit on a journey every night - a recreational journey in his mind. Why do you think he was getting stoned every night? Called a trip for a reason. Sounds pretty acceptable to me. What I don't like is that there are not enough studio albums. I get kinda bored listening to the same ones over.
  24. I watched the '07 gig with my kid. In For Your Life, my kid asked me if the song was called 'Boogie Woogie Wummer'. I think he was referring to the chorus type bit when the lyrics sound like, to me, '... Do it when you wanna...' Obviously neither of us have any idea what the lyrics actually are.
  25. When it is the one and only post, clearly it is just flogging a product to the most likely audience. Has not returned for a chit chat so it seems obvious they are just doing the promotional rounds. But that has nothing to do with how well or not they play, and fair enough I suppose a bit of promotion is good. I just don't like to be sweet talked into a relationship when it is really just a one night stand.