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SteveAJones

Jason Bonham: The Disregard of Scrapbooking

118 posts in this topic

Thanks Steve. Interesting. Was he still using this house at all? And if not, how long has it been vacant for?

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scan0001-1.jpg

Foreigner (with Jason Bonham on drums) performed to a sea of umbrellas in the pouring rain at Niagra Falls on December 31st 2006. This concert aired live on CH and this release contains the complete broadcast. Absolutely phenomenal.

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1990 Carolina Coliseum Advertisement

1990CarolinaColiseum.jpg

Article courtesy of reids

Scan courtesy of Steve A. Jones Archive

I just found this thread. Thank for posting this. I had fourth row seats when they were in Houston but I don't remember the opening act. Was Bonham on the entire tour?

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I saw them in Alabama on the tour with the Cult. They did a Black Dog and it ended with Jason doing a quick drum solo (including the Moby Dick drum beat intro)

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I just found this thread. Thank for posting this. I had fourth row seats when they were in Houston but I don't remember the opening act. Was Bonham on the entire tour?

Yes. Bonham and Tora Tora opened for The Cult on March 2nd 1990 at The Summit in Houston.

Bonham was one of two opening acts on this tour (Dec-Mar), also billed with Dangerous Toys (Jan-Feb) & Tora Tora (Feb-Mar).

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I saw them in Alabama on the tour with the Cult. They did a Black Dog and it ended with Jason doing a quick drum solo (including the Moby Dick drum beat intro)

February 17th 1990 at University of Alabama - Arena in Birmingham. Billed with The Cult and Dangerous Toys.

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I highly recommend the 1994 Live In Montreux DVD with Paul Rodgers:

Paul-Rodgers.jpg

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I highly recommend the 1994 Live In Montreux DVD with Paul Rodgers:

Yes, indeed Sam! An official pro-shot soundboard dvd. Definitely on my want list. I did purchase the accompanying cd release last week.

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Yes. Bonham and Tora Tora opened for The Cult on March 2nd 1990 at The Summit in Houston.

Bonham was one of two opening acts on this tour (Dec-Mar), also billed with Dangerous Toys (Jan-Feb) & Tora Tora (Feb-Mar).

Yes I was there but we must have skipped the opening acts since I don't have any recollection of seeing them. I remember that I felt that the concert should have been longer. I was having too much fun and two hours just didn't seem long enough.

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I highly recommend the 1994 Live In Montreux DVD with Paul Rodgers:

Paul-Rodgers.jpg

Paul with Jason, oh man - Deborah will be searching for this one!!!

:)

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^^ The CD is in the car and the DVD is great!! Like you said, Paul and Jason...you know I had to have them :peace:

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Metalshop (July 1990) (USA)

199007MetalShopPg1of31.jpg

199007MetalShopPg2of31.jpg

199007MetalShopPg3of31.jpg

Scans courtesy Steve A. Jones Archive

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Wow does this bring back the memories. Thanks for posting it Steve. The Hair Band era, for all of its sometimes goofiness was still by and large fun.

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Balingen, Germany

Messegelande - Bang Your Head Festival

June 23, 2006

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I always personally thought that Jason would've been a fine drummer to fill his father's shoes.

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I always personally thought that Jason would've been a fine drummer to fill his father's shoes.

The intent of this thread is to showcase Jason's evolution as a musician. While I don't think there are many who can claim they felt as early as 1984 (or earlier) he could ever fill his father's shoes, certainly he has done on occasion and remains a fine drummer in his own right.

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LATE, GREAT DAD LIVES ON IN DRUMMER

JASON BONHAM BRINGS HIS BAND TO SUMMERS

by Doug Adrianson

The Miami Herald

September 7, 1989

The Disregard of Timekeeping, debut album by the British rock band Bonham, is named for one of the things drummer Jason Bonham inherited from his famous dad.

"I might play three beats against two, five against four, anything but four heartbeats to the bar," Bonham, 23, said by phone.

That gives his powerful playing the same jazzy unpredictability that made the late John "Bonzo" Bonham such a cornerstone of Led Zeppelin. The band never recovered from Bonham's alcohol-related death in 1980.

Bonham, the band, performs tonight at Summers (219 S. Atlantic Blvd., Fort Lauderdale; 462-8978) on its first tour. Music starts after 9; $9 gets you in.

Zeppelin fans who come looking for familiar sounds will find them both in the drumming and in Daniel MacMaster's lead vocals.

"Daniel didn't really sound like (Zeppelin singer) Robert Plant on the demo tapes we heard," Bonham said. "Then we went to hear him in a club. He did a Zeppelin song, and we fell apart laughing. It was identical."

That upper-register banshee wail dominates on cuts like Wait for You and Bringing Me Down. Even so, Timekeeping shows a healthier array of non-Zeppelin influences than many modern metal bands.

There are plenty of rockers in the Bon Jovi mode, but the songs frequently take interesting twists. Side One opens with a three-minute art-rock instrumental that seems rooted in King Crimson or early Genesis. John Smithson's tastefully played synths interlock with Ian Hatton's soulful guitar lines to create a wider variety of textures than most bands in the power- trio-plus-singer tradition.

Bonham has performed with the three surviving Zeppelin members, and he recorded and toured last year with Jimmy Page. It was a little weird playing his dad's old parts on Zeppelin tunes.

"One time Page called me 'Bonzo' by mistake. He got all apologetic."

Now on his own, he admits that the famous name is helping to open doors and draw attention, "but that can easily fly in your face if you don't have the material to back it up."

Asked how he would raise his own (at this point theoretical) children differently than he was raised, Bonham joked, "I'd kick 'em in the butt if they got better than me!"

But then, "No, I'd just try to be more careful so I'd be around."

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Austin American-Statesman

February 3, 1990

Page: F12

Bonham steps out from father's shadow

Author: David Silverman; KNIGHT-RIDDER TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Jason Bonham was slumped in a chair, pondering the crushed ice at the bottom of a foam cup and looking exhausted, like he'd just been tossed from a moving train: mussed hair, rumpled shirt and dazed expression.

"I left Moscow yesterday," he grumbled. "Where the hell am I? Here, have a watch."

Reaching into the pocket of his bomber jacket, he produced what looked to be an $8 plastic timepiece. "It's a promotional device to make you friendly," he said in a mocking tone. "Now you're supposed to love the album, write good things and not ask me any questions about my dad."

The last topic was the first on anyone's mind.

Set aside the fact that Bonham had just returned from the Moscow Music Peace Festival and that his group's debut album, The Disregard of Timekeeping, had just been released. This is the son of one of the greatest rock drummers ever, Led Zeppelin's John Bonham.

"When I was 4, he gave me a little Ludwig drum kit," Bonham said, bringing up the forbidden subject before a question could be asked. "But it wasn't like he was charting the future. If he'd been an accountant he might have given me a calculator, or crayons if he was an artist.

"What I did with them was my own business. He encouraged that."

What Bonham did was to follow in his father's footsteps.

Now, pounding out the rhythm for his own group, named Bonham, the 23-year-old drummer has earned the endorsement of his father's former bandmates, record company and, most importantly, the audience that made Led Zeppelin the first hard-rock godheads.

"I think the people turned on to us originally because of the name," Bonham said unabashedly. "There's really nothing wrong with that. What was I supposed to do, change it to Reagan?

"There's even an element of Zeppelin in our music," he continued, echoing early reviews of The Disregard of Timekeeping.

"But if you consider that most every group from heavy metal to the Beastie Boys in the last 10 years has stolen what my dad did, I don't feel so bad. He taught me. It's the music I heard in the house all the time when I was growing up. I've got the birthright."

Bonham might carry the birthright, but he also carries the burden. When his father died in his sleep after a drinking binge in 1980, it came as no surprise to most. Hard rock and hard living had been synonymous with Led Zeppelin.

Almost a decade later, the son is seeking to divorce the image from the music. Through his involvement with David Lewis and the Make a Difference Foundation, sponsors of the Moscow festival, Bonham spends part of his time preaching substance responsibility.

"Alcohol killed my father," Bonham said. "He went out and got drunk, came home and choked on his vomit in his sleep. There's no escaping that and I've never tried to hide from it.

"We're not saying don't drink. What we're saying is know what you're getting into. Know your limits and don't exceed them. It's pretty simple and pretty safe. I'm taking advantage of music to help spread that."

Courtesy Steve A. Jones Archive

Edited by SteveAJones

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Philadelphia Daily News (PA)

March 28, 1986

Page: 41

VIRGINIA WOLF

Author: JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer

BONHAM THE YOUNGER

Being the son of a famous person is never easy. Practicing the same career as your dad makes matters even tougher.

So it's a pretty big deal that Jason Bonham has learned to smile and say ''thank you very much" when someone notes, in a complimentary fashion, how much the young musician drums like his dad, the late John Bonham of Led Zeppelin fame.

"At first I tried not to sound anything like him," says the 19-year-old, Manchester, England-born chappy, who performs here Monday in a new group called Virginia Wolf, that's opening for The Firm at the Spectrum.

"I've gotten over that now. I realize there's a lot of father in my blood. I probably hit the skins harder now, because of him. A lot of my drum fills and bits are his. But Phil Collins also is a main influence. And the way I have my drums set up is unorthodox. I use three hanging Toms, and just one on the floor, while my father used one hanging and two floor Toms. I don't care what it looks like, it sounds right.

"And as long as it impresses people that 'that guy can play,' if they walk away with a smile on their faces, saying 'that's the son of' ... it'll make me happy."

Jason Bonham can't remember when he couldn't play the drums. "I've seen movies of me when I was four, playing a rhythm pattern, not just bashing away. The funny thing is that I've never had a lesson in my life. I didn't have to practice for hours. It's just something I learned to do, at the same time as I was learning to walk, talk and read."

Bonham has been drumming professionally for "several years." Before Virginia Wolfe - a big beat, corporate rock band in the Bad Company/Free style - there was Airrace, a speedier group that was together for about two years, put out one album and toured 20,000-seat arenas as opening act to Queen. A real trial by fire."I learned a lot about what to do and what not to do in Airrace," says Bonham, vaguely. "There are a lot of egos and harmful distractions on the road you've got to watch out for."

Clearly he doesn't want to go the way of his dad - who literally drank himself to death - "just a stupid mistake, nothing more than that. The tabloids tried to make it into a scandal, but it wasn't. Father didn't want to kill himself. He loved his life and his family. He loved his cars, too - his Ferrari and his Porsche and all the rest. He was a very happy guy."

Jason Bonham has ruminated long and hard on the the idea of performing with a reformed Led Zeppelin. "When Robert Plant first suggested it, I said it'd be wrong. But then I was a bit annoyed I wasn't asked for their one-off (brief appearance) at Live Aid. At the moment, I don't know if they're going to do a full reunion or not, or if I would want to get involved. I don't need to make a million dollars, just like that. What I do need is to grow as a musician, as myself."

Of course, he's not afraid to work an old connection or two, to help put Virginia Wolf on the map. It was, after all, the choice of The Firm - featuring former Zep guitarist Jimmy Page and Bad Company/Free vocalist Paul Rodgers - that landed Wolf the opening slot on this tour. A major introduction.

Jason allows that he knew exactly where and when to send in the Virginia Wolf demo tape, to be guaranteed a proper hearing. But he contends that Page and Rogers auditioned the material "without knowing it was us, specifically. Only after they'd narrowed down the choices to a couple of bands, was it revealed who we were. My connection just put us over the top."

Courtesy Steve A. Jones Archive

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St. Petersburg Times

August 22, 1989

Edition: CITY

Section: FLORIDIAN

Page: 1D

Series: SOUND TRACKS

The beat goes on // Drummer Jason Bonham continues his father's legacy

Author: STEVE PERSALL

Jason Bonham can drop a sharp impression of Dudley Moore into conversations. His British accent, crazy streak and recall of Arthur quips do the trick nicely. Yet there is something sadly ironic about Bonham role-playing the jovial drunk.

Nine years ago, Bonham's father was also a jovial drunk who bashed drums and pounded down drinks one after the other. That is, until John ''Bonzo'' Bonham choked to death on his own vomit after consuming an estimated 40 shots of vodka in a 12-hour period. The coroner's report ruled it death by misadventure - an accidental overdose. Bonham's was the only name on the death certificate, but his binge also marked the demise of the classic rock band Led Zeppelin.

Nine years later, Jason Bonham is reviving memories of his late father as the namesake of a new band. Bonham, the band, ably mimics the Zeppelin sound on its upcoming debut The Disregard of Time Keeping. But this is a case of heredity, rather than the heresy of imitators like Kingdom Come.

This month, Bonham has set up rehearsal camp at a St. Petersburg beach resort to prepare for his own assault on the air waves. His first performance is slated for early September at the Rock-it Club in Tampa.

Rehearsal time gets equal billing with jet skis and fishing rigs at this juncture. A poolside interview and album preview with the 24-year-old drummer indicated Bonham has learned much from his father's talent and tragedy.

''There are bold musicians and there are old musicians but there are no bold, old musicians. Phil Collins said that,'' Bonham said with a laugh. ''That's how my father was. He was the typical dad. He loved home so much that when he went out on the road he went crazy.

''I learned that you live your life to the full, but be careful. The only time I drink a spirit is when somebody offers a vodka and orange juice, and I'll have one or two. It's strange, because people always ask: 'Aren't you worried about drinking because your Dad died one night when he got drunk and choked?' It could happen to anybody.''

Bonham was 14 when it happened to his father. Ten years earlier, his father had given him his first drum set. Most of the youth's time, though, had been spent racing motorcycles. After the tragedy, Bonham decided to grip drumsticks instead of handlebars for a living.

''It was surely a shock, like someone putting a gun to your head and going boom,'' Bonham said, his hand cocking an invisible gun. ''It was hard at first, but after my dad went it was back to drums. I wanted to show people I'm here. They'll never forget my father because I'm here.''

That also means that Bonham will need to live down the sins and live up to the sainthood of his father. Watching Julian Lennon struggle with his heritage has allowed Bonham some perspective.

''When Julian first came out it was like, bang. Everyone bought it, and it was a huge success. Now he's struggling, and I really feel sorry for him,'' Bonham said.

''John Bonham was a drummer. I have a whole band around me. Julian is having such a tough time trying to be a songwriter and all that. To live up to John Lennon - and I hope I'm not saying this wrong - but that's a little more difficult than what I've got to live up to.''

Bonham has had more than a little help from the remaining Led Zeppelin members. He sat in his father's drum stool when the band reunited at the 40th anniversary of Atlantic records last year. His first band, Virginia Wolf, opened for The Firm, headed by guitar wizard Jimmy Page in 1986. And Page invited Bonham on his Outrider tour in 1988. Now the protege has his own project - his own, self-titled band.

''I'm glad you called it a band,'' he said. ''A lot of people, when it first comes out, are going to say, 'Oh, a Jason Bonham solo album.' It's far from that. We're a group of people who like to play rock 'n' roll. We called it Bonham because I signed the deal a long time before the band got together. Then you have a name that's instantly recognizable. People see it and go, 'Oh, what's this?' ''

Bonham laughed off the suggestion that the name could fuel expectations beyond the band's reach. Listeners will be quick to judge whether the album is a ripoff or a testament.

''Oh, yeah, the god of drums and all that,'' he shrugged. ''When they hear the music they'll say, 'Ah, there's why as well.' Because I do have that tendency from my father. The way the music has evolved it has that open space, that huge drum sound. As (producer) Bob Ezrin said when he began, 'You do realize because the band's called Bonham we're going to have to get the biggest drum sound ever.' I said, 'I'm up for that.' ''

The homage to his father can be found on the cover as well as in the grooves. The band's logo incorporates the three mystic circles that represented ''Bonzo'' on Zeppelin album jackets. And it adds three triangles to represent Jason Bonham's task: following the symbols and the cymbals of his famous father.

Courtesy Steve A. Jones Archive

Edited by SteveAJones

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St. Petersburg Times

August 22, 1989

Edition: CITY

Section: FLORIDIAN

Page: 1D

Series: SOUND TRACKS

The beat goes on // Drummer Jason Bonham continues his father's legacy

Author: STEVE PERSALL

Jason Bonham can drop a sharp impression of Dudley Moore into conversations. His British accent, crazy streak and recall of Arthur quips do the trick nicely. Yet there is something sadly ironic about Bonham role-playing the jovial drunk.

Nine years ago, Bonham's father was also a jovial drunk who bashed drums and pounded down drinks one after the other. That is, until John ''Bonzo'' Bonham choked to death on his own vomit after consuming an estimated 40 shots of vodka in a 12-hour period. The coroner's report ruled it death by misadventure - an accidental overdose. Bonham's was the only name on the death certificate, but his binge also marked the demise of the classic rock band Led Zeppelin.

Nine years later, Jason Bonham is reviving memories of his late father as the namesake of a new band. Bonham, the band, ably mimics the Zeppelin sound on its upcoming debut The Disregard of Time Keeping. But this is a case of heredity, rather than the heresy of imitators like Kingdom Come.

This month, Bonham has set up rehearsal camp at a St. Petersburg beach resort to prepare for his own assault on the air waves. His first performance is slated for early September at the Rock-it Club in Tampa.

Rehearsal time gets equal billing with jet skis and fishing rigs at this juncture. A poolside interview and album preview with the 24-year-old drummer indicated Bonham has learned much from his father's talent and tragedy.

''There are bold musicians and there are old musicians but there are no bold, old musicians. Phil Collins said that,'' Bonham said with a laugh. ''That's how my father was. He was the typical dad. He loved home so much that when he went out on the road he went crazy.

''I learned that you live your life to the full, but be careful. The only time I drink a spirit is when somebody offers a vodka and orange juice, and I'll have one or two. It's strange, because people always ask: 'Aren't you worried about drinking because your Dad died one night when he got drunk and choked?' It could happen to anybody.''

Bonham was 14 when it happened to his father. Ten years earlier, his father had given him his first drum set. Most of the youth's time, though, had been spent racing motorcycles. After the tragedy, Bonham decided to grip drumsticks instead of handlebars for a living.

''It was surely a shock, like someone putting a gun to your head and going boom,'' Bonham said, his hand cocking an invisible gun. ''It was hard at first, but after my dad went it was back to drums. I wanted to show people I'm here. They'll never forget my father because I'm here.''

That also means that Bonham will need to live down the sins and live up to the sainthood of his father. Watching Julian Lennon struggle with his heritage has allowed Bonham some perspective.

''When Julian first came out it was like, bang. Everyone bought it, and it was a huge success. Now he's struggling, and I really feel sorry for him,'' Bonham said.

''John Bonham was a drummer. I have a whole band around me. Julian is having such a tough time trying to be a songwriter and all that. To live up to John Lennon - and I hope I'm not saying this wrong - but that's a little more difficult than what I've got to live up to.''

Bonham has had more than a little help from the remaining Led Zeppelin members. He sat in his father's drum stool when the band reunited at the 40th anniversary of Atlantic records last year. His first band, Virginia Wolf, opened for The Firm, headed by guitar wizard Jimmy Page in 1986. And Page invited Bonham on his Outrider tour in 1988. Now the protege has his own project - his own, self-titled band.

''I'm glad you called it a band,'' he said. ''A lot of people, when it first comes out, are going to say, 'Oh, a Jason Bonham solo album.' It's far from that. We're a group of people who like to play rock 'n' roll. We called it Bonham because I signed the deal a long time before the band got together. Then you have a name that's instantly recognizable. People see it and go, 'Oh, what's this?' ''

Bonham laughed off the suggestion that the name could fuel expectations beyond the band's reach. Listeners will be quick to judge whether the album is a ripoff or a testament.

''Oh, yeah, the god of drums and all that,'' he shrugged. ''When they hear the music they'll say, 'Ah, there's why as well.' Because I do have that tendency from my father. The way the music has evolved it has that open space, that huge drum sound. As (producer) Bob Ezrin said when he began, 'You do realize because the band's called Bonham we're going to have to get the biggest drum sound ever.' I said, 'I'm up for that.' ''

The homage to his father can be found on the cover as well as in the grooves. The band's logo incorporates the three mystic circles that represented ''Bonzo'' on Zeppelin album jackets. And it adds three triangles to represent Jason Bonham's task: following the symbols and the cymbals of his famous father.

Courtesy Steve A. Jones Archive

hey steve, there is a great cover story on this month's DRUM! magazine. check it out, bk

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Jason On Tour with Foreigner

Hilton Waikoloa

Kona, Hawaii

March 17, 2007

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As Zeptember turns to Rocktober and the imminent launch of Jason Bonham's Led Zeppelin Experience Tour it seems appropriate to start a new thread for the purpose of presenting a vast array of periodicals, photographs, videoclips, anecdotes, gig reviews etc. from Jason's three decades in rock music.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVwZXtPOl8o

Airraceshaftoflight.jpg

Airrace was the first group Jason Bonham joined, at age 17. They released one hard-driving rock album in 1984, Shaft Of Light.

Vocals: Keith Murrell

Guitars: Laurie Mansworth

Bass: Jim Reid,

Keyboards: Toby Sadler

Drums: Jason Bonham

I bought that Airrace when it first came out and the Virginia Wolf's -very good stuff.

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