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Strider

Sonny Boy Williamson & Jimmy Page: It's A Bloody Life

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You never know what you're going to find when you go crate-digging over the weekend. For $5 I bought a big box of tapes at a yard sale. Going thru the box this morning I discovered this sealed factory 8-Track of Sonny Boy Williamson & Jimmy Page "It's A Bloody Life". This is the 1965 recording of sessions that Jimmy did with Sonny, along with Brian Auger on organ, Micky Waller on drums, and probably other members of Brian Auger's Trinity on the bass and horns.

20151019_122212.thumb.jpg.919863a4122bd320151019_153203.thumb.jpg.b8ee5037311eb320151019_122251.thumb.jpg.e842d3a8ee50bc

Edited by Strider

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Cool find and still sealed after all these years.  It must of made your day when you came across that tape.  Great find.

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Wow, Strider! I think congratulations are in order! This looks like such a highly collectible item! And finding it as a 'brand new' item (with the factory seal intact) must have been all the more exciting!! :thumbsup: 

Edited by Kiwi_Zep_Fan87

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You never know what you're going to find when you go crate-digging over the weekend. For $5 I bought a big box of tapes at a yard sale. Going thru the box this morning I discovered this sealed factory 8-Track of Sonny Boy Williamson & Jimmy Page "It's A Bloody Life". This is the 1965 recording of sessions that Jimmy did with Sonny, along with Brian Auger on organ, Micky Waller on drums, and probably other members of Brian Auger's Trinity on the bass and horns.

20151019_122212.thumb.jpg.919863a4122bd320151019_153203.thumb.jpg.b8ee5037311eb320151019_122251.thumb.jpg.e842d3a8ee50bc

Nice find, Strider. (Need that one, lol)

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Very cool.

I have this on vinyl. It's called Jimmy Page Special Early Works: Featuring Sonny Boy Williamson ..

The cover is a picture of Page Live in 1973..

I See A Man Downstairs is now better known as One Way Out. The Allman Brothers also cover this.
 

Edited by the chase

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Pretty cool find Strider! :thumbsup: You scored well at the yard sale!

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chase, I have it on vinyl, too, though under a different label and title...this is what my vinyl looks like:

R-939936-1281945797.jpeg.thumb.jpg.6eb7e

Here is a sample from the sessions:

 

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Great find, but unless I have some kind of alt version of the two titles mentioned, Page pretty much

just plays simple rhythm blues guitar . Am I missing something here ??? This sounds like session

work and quite subdued.

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Great find, but unless I have some kind of alt version of the two titles mentioned, Page pretty much

just plays simple rhythm blues guitar . Am I missing something here ??? This sounds like session

work and quite subdued.

I'm guessing the thrill is finding a sample of Jimmy Page's session work in pristine condition.  Also, Sonny Boy Williamson died in 1965 so this maybe one of the last recordings he made.

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Actually there is a somewhat rare record called Guitar Boogie and if I recall correctly(I have it, but in storage) there are 3 tracks each from Beck, Page, and Clapton. Overall the playing is really good, it's 

from the early to mid sixties.Page really tears it up, high speed , not sloppy and Beck plays almost

Hawaiian slide on one track. Clapton sounds more raw than usual, an asset in his case. Pretty

sure it was on Immediate Records, but likely a lawsuit etc.,. eventually took it off the market. This

album was actually released illegally in the first place, but that's a different post.

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Actually there is a somewhat rare record called Guitar Boogie and if I recall correctly(I have it, but in storage) there are 3 tracks each from Beck, Page, and Clapton. Overall the playing is really good, it's 

from the early to mid sixties.Page really tears it up, high speed , not sloppy and Beck plays almost

Hawaiian slide on one track. Clapton sounds more raw than usual, an asset in his case. Pretty

sure it was on Immediate Records, but likely a lawsuit etc.,. eventually took it off the market. This

album was actually released illegally in the first place, but that's a different post.

I used to have that on cassette. I believe Jimmy said its just some stuff they recorded at his house. 

1851233.jpg

"Only two of the guitarists appear on any given track. Jeff Beck does not appear on any of the Page/Clapton numbers. Similarly, Clapton doesn't appear on the Allstars tracks."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guitar_Boogie_(album)

Full album here:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLprfpWiHXeWI-_Hs4CZzgW9IOVCCKZugJ

This from 'Jimmy Page: Magus, Musician, Man' by George Case:

Around the same time Page was producing him in the studio, Clapton visited his house in Epson to have some private jams, which Page also recorded. "The Bluesbreakers were playing over in Putney and Eric came to stay at my house. I had a Simon tape recorder that you could DI into [directly inject electric instruments without first playing through an amp], so the two guitars went into the machine and I just did these tapes of Eric and myself playing." The DI trick enabled a huge amount of distortion while the two musicians played around with different twelve-bar I-IV-V progressions. But Page let Andrew Oldham's Immediate label know about the tapes ("I was really championing Eric, as you would"), and they were confiscated as part of both Page's and Clapton's contractual obligations. "I argued that they couldn't put them out, because they were just variations of blues structures, and in the end we dubbed some other instruments over some of them and they came out, with liner notes attributed to me... though I didn't have anything to do with writing them. I didn't get a penny out of it, anyway." This rather exploitative move on the label's part-they were released when given rhythm tracks by Rolling Stones Charlie Watts, Bill Wyman and Mick Jagger playing harmonica-led to some mistrust of Clapton toward Page, and Page's own frustrations at not owning music he had made. It was a bitter lesson. 

 

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