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Sam

Do you have the TIME Magazine original review of LZ III?  I have been searching for it.  I remember reading it in around 1974 when I was looking at back issues of TIME in the school library for a project (not about Zeppelin - the project was about the violence in Northern Ireland).  I recall it was  good review.  At one point they said that Since I've Been Loving You was very soulful or something to that effect.  Maybe something like "it has more soul than a revival meeting"?

Thanks 

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Rereading my December 1977 issue of CREEM today...40 year anniversary...and came across these Led Zeppelin items.

20171223_141559-1.thumb.jpg.c11e0ccebe08546b212b96b0571cbe41.jpg20171223_141757.thumb.jpg.20c70608ea6a94d3b1b289570610ef76.jpg20171223_143702.thumb.jpg.8dcf4fe564a412c4d8665bf55e343df0.jpg

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On 12/23/2017 at 10:33 AM, John M said:

Sam

Do you have the TIME Magazine original review of LZ III?  I have been searching for it.  I remember reading it in around 1974 when I was looking at back issues of TIME in the school library for a project (not about Zeppelin - the project was about the violence in Northern Ireland).  I recall it was  good review.  At one point they said that Since I've Been Loving You was very soulful or something to that effect.  Maybe something like "it has more soul than a revival meeting"?

Thanks 

TIME / Nov. 1970

Roots and Raw Feeling

The juggernaut roll of the Big Beat, the slash of the old blues strain, the euphoria of yeh-yeh-yeh are all fading. With the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper (1967), rock crossed the line into self-consciousness, sophistication and experimentation. The result has been an exciting diversity of sounds produced by eclectic rock musicians. But a problem remains: How can this evolution go on without depleting the primitive power that first gave the music its momentum?

Among the best strategies is the one used by England's Led Zeppelin, which recently dislodged the Beatles as England's most popular rock group (TIME, Sept. 28). The Zeppelin's aim is to explore all the styles and techniques in today's rock spectrum without ever losing a heavy core of raw feeling.

A supergroup consisting of ex-Yard-bird Jimmy Page and three other young veterans of the British rock scene, Led Zeppelin was launched in 1968 in what Lead Vocalist Robert Plant calls a "smash-bang-wallop" fashion. After a week's tour of Scandinavia, the group knocked out its first ragged LP in 15 hours. The group's spontaneity and free-floating blues improvisations struck a responsive chord among the young, and the LP became a million-dollar seller in the U.S.

A far cry from that first hectic session, the group's third album, Led Zeppelin III (Atlantic), now No. 1 on the Billboard charts, was put together during the first six months of this year. The care and leisure show. Gallows Pole shows the clear influence of San Francisco's Creedence Clearwater Revival, and its monosyllabic, root-heavy style is powerful. One of the two best tracks is That's The Way, whose rich harmonies are a perfect match for the somewhat surreal lyrics about adolescent alienation. The other is Since I've Been Loving You, a superb slow-blues song that has more togetherness than a revival meeting.

Kind of Stamp. Led Zeppelin's four members were born to the ashes of World War II, restless or disaffected in school, stirred to life in the 1950s by Elvis Presley and the early rock 'n' rollers. Bass Guitarist John Paul Jones, 24, is the son of a big-band pianist from the swing era. Plant, 22, son of a civil engineer, spent most of his formative years scouring blues-record shops. Drummer John Bonham, 22, son of a carpenter, got his first set of drums at age seven. Page, the eldest at 25, is the son of an industrial personnel manager. "When I first heard rock," he recalls, "and realized that it was not just Guy Mitchell and Pat Boone, but that something was really going on there, then I knew it was for me."

Many groups do not last two years. One reason for Led Zeppelin's survival is that its fans can expect virtually anything from them. "Somewhere along the line, though," says Plant, "we hope there's a kind of stamp that identifies it as us."

 

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Dec 26    Interesting review of first ever US Zeppelin concert on JimmyPage.com today.  I was going to paste it here but then thought maybe I should not.  You can't read the original article on Jimmy's site but if you click the article they have retyped it so it is easy to read. 

 

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32 minutes ago, John M said:

Dec 26    Interesting review of first ever US Zeppelin concert on JimmyPage.com today.  I was going to paste it here but then thought maybe I should not.  You can't read the original article on Jimmy's site but if you click the article they have retyped it so it is easy to read. 

 

1968-12-26-b---denver-review---lzcom.jpg

http://www.ledzeppelin.com/show/december-26-1968

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On 12/14/2017 at 3:19 AM, sam_webmaster said:

photo: Newcastle 1972

1972-11-newcastle-b_lzcom.jpg

 

On 12/15/2017 at 2:38 AM, badgeholder said:

Ha! NIce one That mask got passed around quite a bit in Newcastle

Is the mask of a particular person or character?

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Jones looks a bit evil in that photo, almost looking like Malcom Young of AC/DC

Jones just turned 72 the other day. Some radio program was talking about him on his birthday and they said he was not all that innocent at all and it's just an act to fool people he was not as crazy as Bonham doing damage at the hotels after shows.

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Denver 1977 - Tentative concert date cancelled as Bill Graham was unavailable, filming Apocalypse Now. (Chronicle, 7-20-77)

 

1977-denver-date-cancelled.jpg

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ZEP ZAP GERMANS!
by John Bonham

So, here I sit in my room at the Berlin Hilton; at the end of a four-day German tour. German rain falling outside very depressing. Berlin is not the most exhilarating place in the world - some of us went to The Wall today, and that was a real downer.

Although the audience tonight was fine, at the Deutschlandhalle. About 6,000 Berliners came to see us tonight, which is apparently more than have been to the last three rock concerts in this city put together.

Audiences are pretty much the same everywhere, the only difference over here is that they didn't understand our stage announcements too good. You know, like in Essen on the second night, there were no seats in the hall, and the stage was very high, so Robert had to ask the kids at the front to sit down several times. Eventually he did get the message across, and the show got OK towards the end.

We played Cologne the first night, at the Sporthalle. That was nice, and the act built nicely to a climax. We had to do two encores, which set the pattern for the whole tour. Oh, but Frankfurt on Saturday night  was terrific. We played to 11,000 people at the Festhalle, which is something like an all-Germany record audience.

They were really great, listened very hard and kept quiet throughout the act. Which is the way we like it now, as we have introduced some new acoustic songs into the act, from the next album, Led Zeppelin III.

We flew to Dusseldorf last Thursday to start the tour, and used Dusseldorf's Inter-Continental Hotel as a base for the shows at Cologne and Essen. The flight in was a bit ropey. I'm not really the world's greatest flier. but I particularly hate flying in Germany. There always seems to be such a lot of clouds, so much turbulence, and the plane can't ever seem to be able to fly above the weather. But the flight into Berlin is the worst anywhere, as you have to land in the middle of the city, coming in between the buildings. However, it was good to be with the other lads again for a few days, and we had a right old laugh about all those stupid "breaking-up" rumours. No chance.

I did read in one of the papers that Robert "Percy" Plant has been having a slight go at me about all my cars. Well, I'd just like to report that from now on, Percy will be walking to gigs, as I used to drive him everywhere! By the way, I must tell you about a group I saw up at Mothers Club in Birmingham before I came over to Germany - Trapeze. They are definitely one to watch for this year - really tight now that they've reduced to a three piece. (Record Mirror / 7-70)

1970-07-25-rm-jb-zapgermans.jpg

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

'Why Zeppelin Keep Zipping Along' - 2/70. Robert Plant interview

1970-02-whyzepzippingalong-rp-birmingham.jpg

 

Led Zep Zaps Its Critics (1972) Newcastle

1972-newcastle-zep-zaps-critics.jpg

 

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1-72-award-lziv-display-atlantic.jpg

ATLANTIC RECEIVES OUTSTANDING ACHEIVEMENT AWARD FOR "LED ZEPPELIN" DISPLAY

Atlantic Records VP-Marketing, David Glew and VP-Advertising and Publicity Bob Rolontz with the award winning Led Zeppelin display.

Atlantic Records Vice-President of Marketing, David Glew, announced today that Atlantic Records had received an outstanding achievement award in the 30th annual exhibition of the Metropolitan Printing Industries for its Led Zeppelin display.

“We are honored to have this recognition for our merchandising services”, noted Mr. Glew, “Atlantic has long tried to maintain the utmost quality in all our retail and point of sales advertising materials.”

Selected for outstanding achievement in design and manufacture, “Led Zeppelin” was the work of George Alexander Displays Inc. of New York City. The display survived an exhaustive three month competition in which many thousands of submissions were screened and scored by a panel of distinguished graphic arts experts and designers. George Alexander accepted the award for Atlantic. [Atlantic Bulletin 1/72]

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Here's Chris Welch's review of the October 17, 1969 Carnegie Hall concert that ran in Melody Maker:

1969-10-25--Carnegie-Hall-review---c-wel

Some rare photos of the Carnegie Hall concert can be seen at the link below:

 

Edited by drowan

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On 1/10/2018 at 3:38 AM, sam_webmaster said:

Denver 1977 - Tentative concert date cancelled as Bill Graham was unavailable, filming Apocalypse Now. (Chronicle, 7-20-77)

 

1977-denver-date-cancelled.jpg

Assuming at face value this was published as stated -- on July 20, 1977 -- the "tentative date" would be Tue, July 26, 1977. I'm going to assume this date would have been announced on or around July 14, 1977 when the Day on the Green shows were announced. Initially, I had thought a week to ten days notice to do a Denver show was too short, but that's about how far in advance the Oakland concerts were announced.

http://www.ledzeppelin.com/event/july-14-1977

:thumbsup: 

 

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I know this piece from the New York Daily New June 12, 1977 is on the Forum concert section, but I found a better version.  I wish I still had the original.  I can clearly recall reading it that Sunday morning.  I had been at the June 11 Saturday evening show.  It ended around midnight.  We had a 90 minute drive home, and I had to open my dad's store at 8 am on Sunday.  I ran the store myself on Sundays.  It was the start of the summer season so we were busy.  My high school graduation was later that week.

As the piece says they sure did have Madison Square Garden "packed and howling".

I still wonder who that is with Maureen and the kids in the photo?

5ac213cc79bc5_1977June12DailyNews2.thumb.jpg.9e231f13cdfa6c6a1f45c8f4c9160f73.jpg 

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On 22/02/2018 at 3:23 PM, SteveAJones said:

Assuming at face value this was published as stated -- on July 20, 1977 -- the "tentative date" would be Tue, July 26, 1977. I'm going to assume this date would have been announced on or around July 14, 1977 when the Day on the Green shows were announced. Initially, I had thought a week to ten days notice to do a Denver show was too short, but that's about how far in advance the Oakland concerts were announced.

http://www.ledzeppelin.com/event/july-14-1977

:thumbsup: 

 

It'd answer the question of why there wasn't a Denver show in 1977. I'd assumed it was cos the McNichols arena wasn't built yet (and the Coliseum was too small), but it opened in '75.

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