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SteveAJones

Jason Bonham's Led Zeppelin Experience (Tour)

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4 hours ago, shadowblue said:

Kind of sad. Really what anybody would pay indicates the value of that experience to them. You previously thought this was "value".

That's a pub tribute band with no "connection"! There is an Australian set-up, CCEntertainment, which does an annual 'Led Zeppelin Celebration' called 'Whole Lotta Love' - 4 alternating vocalists, 9 piece band, generally filling smaller theatres. Don't try to act as Led Zeppelin. Musically superb. I think last time I saw them it was about $70AUD. Easily worth double that.

I'm not anti pubs. Amongst the best shows I saw this year were free in pubs or $15-20AUD in small rooms.

I also paid the most I ever have for a concert ticket (last week in a 12000 seat arena). $406AUD for a pommy bass player playing tunes from his earlier bands - and well and truly got my money's worth. I'd have to dig back to Queen in 1976 or the O2 Arena 10/12/2007 show (which to attend, cost me nearly 10x the amount last week) for a show which I'd say might have been"better".

Needless to say, I'm looking forward to JBLZE in Sydney, am OK with the price and don't care whose not there!

 

 

I’ve re-read your post and can’t for the life of me figure out the point your making, or whether or not you’re having a go at me. 😂 

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Nah, not having a go Xolo1974. That's the beauty of opinions - everyone's is different and valid. I had determined that those prices are acceptable to me (my point) - I can't make that decision for anybody else. The "sad" comment was referring to on principle you wouldn't pay that much for a such a show, now matter how good it might be. The $45 tribute band I expect was a great night. I've seen such bands too but I'm expecting that the JBLZE production (and staging costs, no doubt) will be at another level - I'll let you know in 5 weeks.

 

 

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JBLZE rescheduled for OZ and NZ.

jb.jpg

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Bugger!

No word yet from Ticketmaster, even though it seems it was announced 2 days ago. Actually not holding my breath - he was to tour here in 2012 (and I had a ticket then too) and it was cancelled without rescheduling "due to unforseen circumstances".

Leaves me just with the Foo Fighters that weekend... I'll live :)

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From this site..

https://www.jblzedownunder.com/

It still says in the blurb under the poster "Late Jan/Feb" - which are the dates. Ticketmaster have this Feb date (Feb 1st in Bris which I have 2 tickets already) as well as the new May dates. So maybe additional shows???

I cannot see anywhere on the site I quote above stating it's been postponed or moved.

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At least the reacheduled dates are better than his last proposed Australian tour a few years ago that was cancelled. I had airfares booked for & had to lose.

The Ticketmaster site is showing the rescheduled dates now as well

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well that's a bit shit....

I took a few days leave from work.

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11 hours ago, shadowblue said:

Bugger!

No word yet from Ticketmaster, even though it seems it was announced 2 days ago. Actually not holding my breath - he was to tour here in 2012 (and I had a ticket then too) and it was cancelled without rescheduling "due to unforseen circumstances".

Leaves me just with the Foo Fighters that weekend... I'll live :)

He realised he actually had to leave his beloved US;)

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Got me ;)

(But I believe he's playing Hammersmith with BCC at I type :run:)

 

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Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, shadowblue said:

Farking paywall :mad:

 

                                    Skins of the father

His dad was Led Zeppelin's drummer. Then Jason Bonham took on the gig, and the rollercoaster ride began.

                                                                            By Andrew McMillen

                                                                            May 12th, 2018, The Australian

6f143432f42c0e7960011d5aa7eddff5.thumb.jpg.cc629b7318d9c4650c1778a88acdbe43.jpg

Jason Bonham: "To be introduced to people as the drummer of Led Zeppelin -- it was surreal."

 

As a young musician navigating the English rock business in the mid-1980s, Jason Bonham found his famous surname could cut both ways. The people he encountered usually tended to try one of two approaches.

They'd either blow smoke up his arse, simply because his father was John Bonham, legendary drummer of rock band Led Zeppelin.

Or they'd make snide remarks if his talents were perceived to be less than those of his old man, who worked the drum kit like one possessed until his untimely death, aged 32, in September 1980, which effectively ended the band.

"I faced way more critique: the door might open quicker, but it can also slam," Bonham says of that time in his life. "Everyone expects another standard; a different level. They expect you to be amazing from the moment they see you, and if you're not quite up to par ... I remember a few drummers were like: 'Well, you're no Bonzo, are ya?' "

Born in 1966, Bonham grew up during Led Zeppelin's heyday. He began learning to play drums at the age of four; a snippet from the 1976 concert film The Song Remains the Same shows a small blond boy keeping steady time while chewing gum and twirling a drumstick.

The boy was 14 when his father died suddenly, after choking on his vomit following a heavy drinking session. Though he was more interested in motocross as a child, it was not long before he decided to follow his father by pursuing music as a career.

Doors swung open: the first band he joined, Airrace, opened for Queen. His next band, Virginia Wolf, opened for the Firm, a rock supergroup that featured Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page on guitar. Page then asked Bonham to play drums on his 1988 solo album, Outrider , and on the subsequent tour.

                          b138b8ae7619ee512ffa69254f05baee.jpg.486b7782d8b83359a64d7ea6797eb180.jpg

                          John Bonham performing with Led Zeppelin in London, 1975. Picture: Dick Barnatt/Redferns

The three surviving Led Zeppelin members reformed the band that year for a single show to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Atlantic Records, with Bonham behind the kit. No one disgraced themselves, but the five-song performance didn't exactly set the world alight, in part because of the short rehearsal time.

Still, those high-profile appearances earned him a record deal for the first album under the Bonham band name, 1989's The Disregard of Timekeeping. This led to a tour with Motley Crue that he describes as "one hell of a stag night", as he married his wife, Jan Charteris, immediately afterwards; Zeppelin played at their wedding reception.

"I was treated like a movie star," he says on the phone from his home in Florida, where he and Charteris have two children together. "It felt very surreal. I look back on it now, and some of the behaviour that I portrayed ... I was young and naive. Having a few beers, getting a bit pissed and having a joke -- sometimes it's not the most professional thing to do. But when you're 22 or 23, and you've just got a gold album and everyone's kissing your arse, you become a little bit of a prick, if you ask me," he says with a laugh. "Pardon the expression."

His first visit to Australia occurred in an era when record companies were so flush with cash that flying a British band around the world just to shoot a music video sounded like a fine idea, which explains why Change of a Season, from the 1992 album Mad Hatter, was filmed in the Blue Mountains town of Katoomba, NSW.

 

After renaming to the Jason Bonham Band, in 1997 he decided to release an album of live Zeppelin covers named In the Name of My Father: The Zepset. "In some ways, that was the acorn that grew into the tree, which is what inspired the first run of going out and playing just those songs," he says.

That same year he released another album of original music with that band, When You See the Sun, but the door was soon to slam.

"My drinking was really spiralling out of control at that point in my life," he recalls. "I had a three-year-old, and then my son was born, and I was not enjoying being away at all. It almost all came to a grinding halt when I wanted to go home, and just stop and reassess."

Strangely, it was a call to visit London for a film audition that changed everything.

3bd1c8d3dfd6409bd8be59c6db33544d.jpg.8770ab8cb7f879cf7f8906067b99a942.jpg

Led Zeppelin, 1979: Jimmy Page, left, John Bonham, Robert Plant and John Paul Jones.

The 2001 film Rock Star featured Mark Wahlberg in the lead role. Bonham performed in a fictional band named Steel Dragon. "That period of doing Rock Star was my realisation that I was an alcoholic; an addict," he says. "I was portraying one in a movie and realising that I had a problem. So the year it was released, I stopped, and haven't touched it or drugs since."

It was with a clear head, then, that he undertook six weeks of rehearsals with Page, singer Robert Plant and bassist John Paul Jones ahead of a one-off performance at London's 02 Arena in December 2007. Arranged as a benefit concert in memory of Atlantic Records co-founder Ahmet Ertegun, the Guinness Book of World Records noted that 20 million requests were made for the 20,000 available tickets.

"That six weeks I had with them was some of the most amazing time of my life," says Bonham. "To be around them for that length of time, every day; to walk around with them; to be introduced to people as the drummer of Led Zeppelin -- it was surreal. I expected my father to walk in the room at any point." That 2007 concert was met with universal praise, with Bonham's performance behind the kit singled out for matching the uncanny groove and feel of his father. It later was released in 2012 as a live film and album under the name Celebration Day but, for the drummer, the years that followed the London show were some of the most unpleasant of his life.

 

 "I remember my mum saying to me, 'I'm really happy for you, but I'm scared that if it stops, will you be able to deal with it?' " he recalls. "And I was like: 'Yeah, yeah, yeah, sure, sure." But when it did stop, it ripped my soul out.

"I could not believe that I'd got this close. We did the gig. I was happy I did that, but I really hit a dark patch. I think if I was going to ever drink again or anything, it was in 2008 and 2009; [those years] were sending me a message of darkness, because I was like: 'You know what? I'm done. I can't even think about being in another band now.' "

His manager suggested that he attempt to address the darkness head-on by trying another Zeppelin live venture. "I said: 'Is that the best advise you have for me right f. king now? I've just played with them; the last thing I want to go and do is tarnish [that]. ' But after lots and lots of persuasion, once I realised I could make it a personal thing, it grew."

All of which explains why, after a lifetime of bearing the weight of his famous surname, the musician now tours the world playing the songs of his father and his three friends.

With the door to another Led Zeppelin reunion firmly shut, these concerts are devoted to the simple pleasures of sharing and celebrating the music of one of the greatest bands to write and record rock 'n' roll.

Jason Bonham's Led Zeppelin Evening will appear in Sydney on May 23, then Melbourne, Perth, and Brisbane.

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/arts/review/led-zeppelin-drummer-john-bonhams-son-jason-on-life-and-fame/news-story/0a2952fe65e068ecd5bb114cefdb2bfc                             

 

 

Edited by luvlz2

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That was a good read, cheers for posting.

I didn’t know that he was still hammering the sauce into the late 90s, I thought he had cleaned up by then.

Also interesting that he was in an emotional trough after the O2 gig.

Shows how much hope he had for a full reunion.

glad he’s in a better place now. He’s a great drummer and has nothing to prove anymore.

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