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Mr Awesome

Led Zeppelin being booed by the audience?

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Is this true? I heard a story once long ago that when Led Zeppelin first played in Detroit, it may have been at the Grande Ballroom, that the auditence booed them. Jimmy Page took the microphone and said "Some day you will pay good money to see this band." It might be true, but I wasn't there

Is this true, are there other moments were Led was being disrespected?

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http://www.stevehoffman.tv/forums/archive/index.php/t-211803-p-4.html

Somebody posted about a recollection by Mark Farner of Grand Fund Railroad...........I don't know if this is the specific instance but truth be told, if I was in that audience I'd have booed too.

'Here's Mark Farner's account below. Peter Grant did pretty much the same thing at the Bath Festival in 1970 (on a band called The Flock) so that Zep could go on as the sun was setting.

-------------------------------

What happened -- that story arose from an incident. We opened for Led Zeppelin at Olympia in Detroit. And the crowd was going nuts. We just broke into "Inside Looking Out" and the whole audience just (cheered) and at that point, Led Zeppelin's manager, Peter Grant, jerked the power on us. He shut the whole PA system down ... So then Terry (Knight, Grand Funk Railroad's manager at the time) comes out, they turn a microphone on, he says ... "Grand Funk is going to have to leave the stage." And the audience went boo. And Zeppelin waited an hour and a half before they went on, after we went off ... We were supposed to be on for a tour, but that was the only night we got to open for them ...

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There was a gig in Tempe 1977 that people would make bad comments after the show, like "Led Zeppelin didn't eat their Wheaties".

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Seattle as well. The band went on 40 minutes late and the sound was less than Zeppelin standards; it was one of the first concerts in the Kingdome and those early shows had lots of sound problems. Wings and Frampton both played there in 76' with similar results. I remember a rather disappointed crowd afterwards.

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http://www.stevehoff...211803-p-4.html

Somebody posted about a recollection by Mark Farner of Grand Fund Railroad...........I don't know if this is the specific instance but truth be told, if I was in that audience I'd have booed too.

I'm flabbergasted. Wow, if this is true, That's real low. Grand Funk, as they were called then, did not have fantastic guitar work or anything but they still had a sound that was powerful. First time I heard "Sin's a good man brother" i was blown away by the power of the bass.

As much as I love Zeppelin, I would have booed too. It just doesn't look right and it says something quite unsettling.

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I found this from the book An American Band: The Story of Grandfunk Railroad By Billy James

We blew Led Zeppelin off stage!

In late summer of ‘69, Grand Funk continued to play more shows, receiving similar enthusiastic responses to the one at the Atlanta Pop Festival. The band were booked as the opening group for Led Zeppelin at Detroit’s Olympia Stadium. The audience’s reaction was so intense that Peter Grant, Led Zeppelin’s manager, pulled the plug on the group in the middle of “Inside Looking Out”. Grant, a six-foot-four-inch ex-wrestler, in furious rage grabbed Terry Knight by the throat and lifted him off the ground. Holding Knight eye-to-eye, Grant roared, “You’ll take the group off stage… immediately!” A visibel shaken Terry Knight proceeded to go on-stage and stop the group, exclaiming to the crowd, “Led Zeppelin are afraid to follow Grand Funk!” At that point the audience began to boo and hiss as Grand Funk left the stage. Sometime later, Lee Michaels took the stage and performed his set. By the time Led Zeppelin started their show the stadium was half full. “We blew Led Zeppelin off stage!”, Schacher remembers.

With more than a small amount of tension in the air, Grand Funk opened once again for Led Zeppelin in Cleveland, Ohio. The fans reaction was the same and subsequently Grand Funk were thrown off the tour, never to play on the same bill with Led Zeppelin again.

http://houseofrockin...-exclusive.html

From an interview with Mark Farner:

NHOR : Grand Funk opened up for Led Zeppelin in 1969 at Detroit's Olympia Stadium and their manager Peter Grant actually pulled the plug on you guys. What was that like?

MF : I reckon that we were upstaging those boys who were fixing to come on, and they might've had a bit of difficulty after us. In fact, they waited an hour and a half before they took the stage after we left. I think it was just to let the audience cool down, but by that time half the audience had already left. They were pissed off. But that's the power of that three piece funk stuff from Flint, Michigan.

.....And another account from the book Whole Lotta Led Zeppelin

http://books.google.com/books?id=Q6d41Yu-nUsC&pg=PT32&lpg=PT32&dq=grand+funk+led+zeppelin+olympia+stadium&source=bl&ots=bBz9Ncf7rV&sig=irmW6x6NMwVoi9d8FeAQr8mDEwg&hl=en&sa=X&ei=l0YqT9KAKoaE2wXtt-SBDw&ved=0CEwQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=grand%20funk%20led%20zeppelin%20olympia%20stadium&f=false

Edited by betteremily

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I recall on a boot from Birmingham (UK) from 16th or 17th December 72 that during Dazed & Confused someone close to the taper shouts most unflatteringly:

" BORING". Amazing really as I consider that period to be the best by the band. Also University of Kent in 1971 they apparently didn't go down too well. Again it's a matter of taste really. Weird that no tapes at all have ever been reported on the "Back to the clubs" tour (except Belfast & Dublin).

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Seattle as well. The band went on 40 minutes late and the sound was less than Zeppelin standards; it was one of the first concerts in the Kingdome and those early shows had lots of sound problems. Wings and Frampton both played there in 76' with similar results. I remember a rather disappointed crowd afterwards.

It was their only gig there. The show was mediocre, Page was sloppy, but when he did Stairway.... that solo was amazing!

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It was their only gig there. The show was mediocre, Page was sloppy, but when he did Stairway.... that solo was amazing!

yes, I know. I was referring to it being one of the first concerts ever held in the Kingdome, Wings being the first. The show was mediocore and a far cry from their performance two years earlier at the Seattle Colisum (now Key Arena). According to Plant he could only hear out of one ear and Page had not slept in days. Edited by Mudslider

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I'm flabbergasted. Wow, if this is true, That's real low. Grand Funk, as they were called then, did not have fantastic guitar work or anything but they still had a sound that was powerful. First time I heard "Sin's a good man brother" i was blown away by the power of the bass.

As much as I love Zeppelin, I would have booed too. It just doesn't look right and it says something quite unsettling.

Mel Schacter was a remarkable bass player, very very melodic. He doesn't get the credit today that he deserves.

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I wouldn't take Grand Funk's word for it that they blew Zep off the stage - we'd need a more objective source, otherwise it's just macho boasting. Someone from Lynrd Skynrd (or however it's spelled!) said the same thing about Knebworth - not '79, an earlier gig. Pfft.

Did English concert audiences used to be very quiet? I remember hearing a taped broadcast on the radio of a Zep concert from the early 70's, and I thought they were bombing, the audience was so quiet in between songs. But Robert sounded unfazed, so I guessed it was normal. I wish I could remember more identifying info about the gig, all I remember is Robert's comment to the crowd, "I must tell you about my bottle - completely gone." Everyone laughed but I'm still not sure what he meant - I'm never really sure what Mr. Plant is talking about, to be honest but he's so charming.

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Totally believable. Even though Grand Funk Railroad was from Flint, by this time they had been adopted by Detroit rock audiences as a local band in the same way as the MC5. Both had been playing small clubs in the Detroit area for years, and had built a large loyal local following. Even though Zep was the headliner, there were probably more people there to see Grand Funk Railroad. Both acts were reaching at this time to play an arena-sized show. What's amazing, is that someone actually let Peter Grant pull the plug. Tickets for this show were $3.50

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I wouldn't take Grand Funk's word for it that they blew Zep off the stage - we'd need a more objective source, otherwise it's just macho boasting. Someone from Lynrd Skynrd (or however it's spelled!) said the same thing about Knebworth - not '79, an earlier gig. Pfft.

If you're referring to the "Skynyrd blew the Rolling Stones off the stage at Knebworth" story, that didn't come from any of the members of Lynyrd Skynyrd themselves, it came from the audience. Even so, the truth of the matter is that Skynyrd apparently performed in the late afternoon (this footage makes up the bulk of Freebird the Movie) and the Stones didn't play until late at night so it's not like their sets were in close proximity to one another.

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I don't think the comment should be directed toward the band, but to the manager. If Grant pulled the plug, what does that half to do with Led Zeppelin as a group? In other words, it wasn't Zeppelin's fault, but the management - which unfortunately effects the band itself because he represents them.

Whether or not Peter Grant was intimidated by Grand Funk or fearing they would possibly overshadow Zeppelin- I can't answer. But I'm quite sure with the track record Zeppelin had for live shows at the time and the complete confidence he had in the band (Zeppelin) that maybe it was more the case of a time limit issue?

It sounds quite possible that the whole story there is exaggerated in a small way. The crowd may have wanted to hear more Grand Funk before the power was cut, but I don't think that's a case of blowing Zeppelin off the stage- how does a band get "booed" if they hadn't even come on stage yet......?

In the account it says they started to boo after the manager of The Funk said, "Led Zep are afraid to go on after us"...

That's a big difference from Zeppelin themselves being "booed" off stage immediately following Grand Funk. (which didn't happen) .

Edited by Rock Historian

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I think what really happened here was a poor alottment of time by the promoters. Outsiders probably didn't take in consideration that the 3rd billed band would get such a response. If GFR had a half hour time slot, it probably wasn't enough, and that disappointed the locals. Grant probably figured that if GFR was given more time, Zep wouldn't hit the stage until quite late. There may have also been a city curfew for the show that had to be honored. I blame it on Lee Michaels....You know what I mean ?

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I think what really happened here was a poor alottment of time by the promoters. Outsiders probably didn't take in consideration that the 3rd billed band would get such a response. If GFR had a half hour time slot, it probably wasn't enough, and that disappointed the locals. Grant probably figured that if GFR was given more time, Zep wouldn't hit the stage until quite late. There may have also been a city curfew for the show that had to be honored. I blame it on Lee Michaels....You know what I mean ?

:hysterical: Ok.......blame Lee (nice one!)

Yes, I agree with the time limit Bong - Man (see my post) ^

Edited by Rock Historian

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I wouldn't take Grand Funk's word for it that they blew Zep off the stage - we'd need a more objective source, otherwise it's just macho boasting. Someone from Lynrd Skynrd (or however it's spelled!) said the same thing about Knebworth - not '79, an earlier gig. Pfft.

Yes, I agree...just macho posturing. The Knebworth you refer to was in 1976...and Lynyrd Skynyrd did impress more than the Stones that day.

Did English concert audiences used to be very quiet? I remember hearing a taped broadcast on the radio of a Zep concert from the early 70's, and I thought they were bombing, the audience was so quiet in between songs. But Robert sounded unfazed, so I guessed it was normal. I wish I could remember more identifying info about the gig, all I remember is Robert's comment to the crowd, "I must tell you about my bottle - completely gone." Everyone laughed but I'm still not sure what he meant - I'm never really sure what Mr. Plant is talking about, to be honest but he's so charming.

You have to understand that the BBC were very British and quaint. They didn't want any unruliness on their radio broadcasts, so they would ask the audience to be quiet during the songs and just politely clap afterwards. The BBC engineers were also notorious for being adamant about never letting the needle "go in the red", meaning they didn't want to record shows at too high a volume and distortion. Which is why the BBC Paris Theatre show of April 1, 1971 sounds so sedate compared to other radio rock concert broadcasts, like the King Biscuit Flower Hour.

If you're referring to the "Skynyrd blew the Rolling Stones off the stage at Knebworth" story, that didn't come from any of the members of Lynyrd Skynyrd themselves, it came from the audience. Even so, the truth of the matter is that Skynyrd apparently performed in the late afternoon (this footage makes up the bulk of Freebird the Movie) and the Stones didn't play until late at night so it's not like their sets were in close proximity to one another.

Lynryd Skynyrd played in the afternoon...then 10cc...then after a long hour-plus wait, the Stones. Nevertheless, Skynyrd's set was THE ONE people remembered from that day, so in effect, they did blow the Stones away. Just like ZZ Top blew the Stones away in 1981 when I saw them at the Houston Astrodome and the Dallas Cotton Bowl.

Once again, this is an example of a poorly-titled thread. How could Led Zeppelin have been booed off the stage when they hadn't even played their set yet. Peter Grant was booed, yes. The audience wanted more GFR than the brief set they got...that was the promotors fault. And Peter Grant, who was being a little too sensitive. But then, if there was a time curfew, that could have been a problem. If I buy a ticket, I don't want the headliner's set cut short because of the opener...no matter how good the opening act is, I came to see the headliner.

And waiting as long as they did meant that some of the audience(according to this source, which isn't exactly impartial) left by the time Zeppelin came on. But do we have any proof or evidence that ONCE the band did come and play that people booed them? I have a hard time believing that.

Other than Gene Simmons and KISS, no other band from the 70s has done a better job of self-aggrandizement and inflating their own myth than Grand Funk Railroad. Much of what they say about themselves is to be taken with a hefty grain of salt.

Edited by Strider

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When Plant refers to "His bottle" is an English expression to errrr how can i out this? Nerves, Guts or confidence. For example: You are about to take a penalty in football ( or for you US folks a conversion) you run up and fluff it completely - you got so nervous that you "Lost your bottle". Happens a lot when you chat up gilrs/boys. Yes we Englsih have strange expressions!

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When Plant refers to "His bottle" is an English expression to errrr how can i out this? Nerves, Guts or confidence. For example: You are about to take a penalty in football ( or for you US folks a conversion) you run up and fluff it completely - you got so nervous that you "Lost your bottle". Happens a lot when you chat up gilrs/boys. Yes we Englsih have strange expressions!

Is that like re: the BBC Sessions Percy says... "I'm must tell you about my bottle, completely gone, completely gone...."

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I recall on a boot from Birmingham (UK) from 16th or 17th December 72 that during Dazed & Confused someone close to the taper shouts most unflatteringly:

" BORING". Amazing really as I consider that period to be the best by the band. Also University of Kent in 1971 they apparently didn't go down too well. Again it's a matter of taste really. Weird that no tapes at all have ever been reported on the "Back to the clubs" tour (except Belfast & Dublin).

You can hear someone close to the taper shout the same thing during "Over the Top" on the second night at Cleveland '77.

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The fact that I've seen the singer of GFR say this in multiple interviews is telling in and of itself. Glad you have to invoke Led Zeppelin to try to fluff yourself. I love Led Zeppelin, and know there where nights when the wheel didn't roll on. But any musician with intellect wouldn't make comments like that. GFR could never touch the depth of the musical spectrum that was Led Zeppelin.........

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