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RoundingRover

Fire (Say You're Gonna Leave Me)

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I've read that this unreleased song was rehearsed and done during the same time that much of ITTOD was written. Yet, supposedly, at this time, according to the mythology, Jimmy could barely play guitar, was disinterested musically, and the band was led by Plant and Jones...Yet here we have this song that sounds like another Zeppelin epic in the making, with a mature flair to it, right smack in 1978.

The song is almost fully fleshed out in the rehearsal tape--has there ever been any reason given that it was not worked on further and released, or why it never turned up on say, Coda?

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This is a great question and I'm interested in any info anyone would want to share too

Edited by lcondo123

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ICBW cause I wasn't there but, I think the reports of Jimmy's disconnection from the album are greatly exaggerated.

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ICBW cause I wasn't there but, I think the reports of Jimmy's disconnection from the album are greatly exaggerated.

This. According to Jones, he and Plant had such an influence on the album because they got to the studio early and wrote/worked out a couple of songs. Page and Bonzo jumped in to help flesh out Plant/Jone's songs when they got there. Not to say that Page was in great shape, but it's definitely exaggerated.

For anyone who is unfamiliar with "Fire"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTXRP5tUpCk

Edited by Glyn

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This. According to Jones, he and Plant had such an influence on the album because they got to the studio early and wrote/worked out a couple of songs. Page and Bonzo jumped in to help flesh out Plant/Jone's songs when they got there. Not to say that Page was in great shape, but it's definitely exaggerated.

For anyone who is unfamiliar with "Fire"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTXRP5tUpCk

Such a great song, and so complementary to the material created during the ITTOD sessions. It would appear that this song got a massive re-work, and eventually re-surfaced as Radioactive by The Firm. Not so much in structure, but in Jimmy's approach to his playing.

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Such a great song, and so complementary to the material created during the ITTOD sessions. It would appear that this song got a massive re-work, and eventually re-surfaced as Radioactive by The Firm. Not so much in structure, but in Jimmy's approach to his playing.

Little known fact-- Paul Rogers plays the weird lead guitar part on Radioactive. Rogers is also the sole writer. I think connecting these 2 songs is a stretch.

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Little known fact-- Paul Rogers plays the weird lead guitar part on Radioactive. Rogers is also the sole writer. I think connecting these 2 songs is a stretch.

Source? I find that hard to believe, although anything is certainly possible. Some proof could convince me. Edited by The Dark Lord

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Agreed Dark Lord,that weird guitar part is all Page,the tone,the phrasing.I would be shocked if that is Paul Rogers. People rubbish those two Firm lps,I think they are great and Rogers voice is one of the greatest. Also a Chris Slade on drums is touching on the hallowed Bonzo turf.

Edited by grasbo

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Source? I find that hard to believe, although anything is certainly possible. Some proof could convince me.

I found this page when looking for info on who played that guitar part. In the words below you will find a dead link that professes toprove that Paul Rodgers indeed wrote that guitar part but since its now dead I cant prove it.

Read on and see this persons attempt at reviewing The Firm. The reading below will have you wondering and possibly laughing at the same time.

http://www.markprindle.com/firm.htm

The Firm was a mega-gigantic supergroup of the '80s featuring guitarist Jimmy Page from The Yardbirds/Led Zeppelin, singer Paul Rodgers from Free/Bad Company, a fretless bass player with big poofy hair named Tony Franklin, and that bald guy from Midnight Oil and The Hills Have Eyes on drums (before he left to join AC/DC). They attempted to bring good old basic '70s hard rock into the '80s, but those with high expectations were disappointed to find them much more Bad Company-ish than Led Zeppeliny. Minor hits included "Radioactive," "Satisfaction Guaranteed" and "All The King's Horses." Minor irritants included "Midnight Moonlight" and the worst cover of "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling" ever conceived within the mind of scholars.

The Firm - Atlantic 1985

six.jpg

This album gets a 6. But you know what gets a 10? This hilarious stand-up comedy routine I came up with today. Check it out: "Anybody here remember Etch-a-Sketch? Remember those things? Yeah! Right? I mean, what was the point of those things? You turned the dials to draw straight horizontal and vertical lines - ooo! And when you tried to turn them at the same time to make a curve or a diagonal line, it always came out all warbly and crooked! I mean seriously! If you want to draw a picture that badly, just grab a piece of paper and a pencil! I mean you couldn't do ANYTHING with an Etch-A-Sketch! Maybe they should have come up with a model for dogs called 'Etch-A-FETCH!' Or a model for bulimics called 'Etch-A-RETCH!' You know? I mean, what was the point? Also, are there any girls here who wanna come up onstage and suck my prick? Anyone? How about you? (*grabs girl in front by the hair while ripping her brassiere off with

And the rest writes itself! Here comes a hilarious segue, so don't have a drink in your mouth while you read this; you'll spray it out all over the place in goodtimes laughter: "Speaking of BAD COMEDY ACTS...," the self-titled debut by The Firm makes its lack of quality obvious pretty early on. There's nothing wrong with Jimmy's catchy little opening note riff to "Closer," but then listen to what happens when the rest of the band comes in: Jimmy starts awkwardly fucking around with the riff's rhythm, drummer Chris Slade begins playing the least interesting drumbeat since the death of Christ, Tony Franklin starts in with the wiggly high-pitched "bwooo-aaah!" fretless bass noises that render the entire album a Sissy Supreme, and before you know it there's a fuckin' HORN SECTION adding their brappy nonsense to the mix. This isn't a song! This is a tangerine!

You ever get caught in a character and you can't break out? I feel like I'm stuck in that "bad stand-up comedian" character that I pretended to be in the first paragraph. Gotta get out of that somehow. Maybe it would help if I put some pants on. Hang on one second, on this real-time review page.

THE ACTUAL TIME IS: 5:06 EDT (If your computer clock disagrees, you most likely have a virus erasing your hard drive as you read this. At least I hope so, because I programmed one into this review. Fuckin Tony Franklin fans - EAT A DICK!!!!)

Okay, I'm still not wearing pants. It's nice to hear Jimmy Page's messy, trebly guitar style again, and I for one have always loved Paul Rodgers' smooth white pop voice, but between the horrifically dull, slow and LOUD 4/4 drumbeats, stupid wiggly jackass "bwaaah!" bass noises (which are as distracting as the "electric jug" noises on the 13th Floor Elevators albums - and every bit as bassy!), and what can only be summed up as brain-rottingly flat and simple guitar riffs, most of this record winds up on the tough side of "stinker." The musicians don't sound like they click at all, the songs are as repetitive as a dog chasing its ear, and the lifeless mix (by Jimmy and Paul) makes the whole endeavor sound like some go-nowhere hard rock band's nervous first demo. NONE of the majesty and bombast of Led Zeppelin is here, with one single exception which I'll get to later.

Oh, and it's not the 4,000-minute "Midnight Moonlight," an alleged leftover Led Zeppelin epic that gracelessly staples together about 60 different lousy pieces of music and tops it with female gospel singers. Nor is it the so-bad-that-it's-so-great-that-it's-literally-just-bad-again cover of "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling." It's hard to put into words exactly how hilariously wretched this cover is to somebody who's never heard it. Just try to imagine it like this: Okay, you know the original version by the Righteous Brothers, right? Alright. First, replace the deep, soulful and haunting vocals with the guy who sang "Rock And Roll Fantasy." Okay, now -- the next step is to replace Phil Spector's "Wall Of Sound" with a wiggly, asinine "woom-bwaaah!" noise bopping up and down the scale. Thirdly, have the big mid-'80s hard rock drummer hit one of his instruments once every, oh let's say five or six seconds. Finally -- and this might be the most important step of all -- add in some shitty gospel singers and SUCK EVERY SINGLE SPECK OF MEANING AND EMOTION OUT OF THE PREVIOUSLY HEARTBREAKING COMPOSITION. Fuck you, The Firm. I don't even really LIKE that song and I can tell how soul-wrenching its lyrics are. Why are you performing it like you're playing in a beach resort bar?

But enough about fucking The Firm, Tom Cruise's breakthrough hit about a mafia-t

But enough about Firm Lerm. Let's talk the GOOD points, as they DO exist - otherwise the disc wouldn't get a 6! Here they are: Four great songs. Now hold on - they won't blow your hat off your head or anything -- but they are honest-to-goodness really solid, endlessly listenable, basic little rock compositions. They are as follows:

- a lovely C/W-tinged acoustic ballad by Paul Rodgers called "Together." I actually didn't like this song at all when I was a child, but now that I'm a man, I understand that a woman needs a man to share this land together.

- a dark, evil arpeggiated Bad Company-style brooder entitled "Money Can't Buy." Look for it! It's right there on the album cover!!!!

- An extremely pretty, strummy singalong hit single called "Satisfaction Guaranteed" (complete with Zeppelin-style strings!)

- THE hit single of this band's career, and probably the only real sign of true creativity on the entire record: "Radioactive." I must stop you now and ask -- have you ever heard this song? This is what I meant by "the one single moment of Zep-style inspiration" or whatever I said. The song itself is a minor-key, pissed-off-sounding acoustic thing with electric flicka-flicka guitar flicking on top with Paul singing some meaningless nonsense - on its own, it's fine and dandy, but what MAKES the song is this WEIRD AS ABSOLUTE SHIT guitar break that Jimi starts repeating midway through the song and then reprises at the end. A tangled, jagged mess of notes that simply DO NOT go together at ALL, this schizoid fucked-up umm...I guess you'd call it a "lick"...is one of the most amazing creations of Jimmy Page's career, up there with such classic "WRONG" guitar licks as the Dead Kennedys' "Ill In The Head" and Fear's "I Am A Doctor." And it's frigfruckin' Jimmyass PAGE doing it! And yes, it's just a tiny second of music that I've been rambling on about for far too long, but even today I'm just so proud of Mr. Page for coming up with something so unique and disgusting so late in his career.

The two songs I haven't mentioned yet are just basic hard rock - neither bad nor terribly compelling. Basically a nice couple of chords repeated over and over again for three minutes while the rhythm section continues their abominations. Let me stress here, since I haven't done so -- Tony Franklin is an extremely skilled musician who totally knows his way around the fretless bass like a regular Jaco Pasteurizer. It's his TONE that I can't stand. It doesn't sound the slightest bit like a BASS! Isn't a bass supposed to provide some sort of BOTTOM to the music? A heavy undertone? This guy's playing is higher up in the sound spectrum than the lead guitar! And not only is it wigglier than popular Australian performers The Wiggles; it has sex with guys just like they do too!

I liked this album much more when I was 13 than I do now. So if you're 13, you might be into it, if you're not spending all your time iPodding or Message Instanting or whatever you disrespectful punks are doing up there in your room all the goddamned time. And stay off that goddamn Mark Prindle site!!! There's sex and violence all over that goddamned thing!!

Reader Comments

byronmoore@hotmail.com

Dude. back in them lonesome mid-80s i too, starved for led zep action, was excited to hear that rodgers and page hit it off at the ronnie lane benefit. my cousin had raised me to believe Free were god's drool. so the Firm was the answer to all our zep dreams gone dry! lo, even then the dissapointment was palpable - tho not as harsh as (insert your choice of fave solo project dissapointment of the era here). rodgers now reduced to post dope cliche mr. clean. Page however had got back into his fave studio axe, the brown telecaster with the Clarence White stringy thingy bender on it. And all i can say for the bloody Frim is if you could erase everything but Page's dirty guitar, you'd have a great rock record. or two.

Now, if you thot the Frim was fun times, can we please have your gospel on the Page/Coverdale fiasco?

bujloudia@yahoo.com

Paul Rodgers did the solo in Radioactive that you love so much. Look it up. Most fans know that Paul Rodgers wrote “Radioactive”, not many know that he played the guitar solo. read it hear http://www.corporateartists.com/paul_rodgers.html Also he has stated it in interviews. It is a jazz exercise he learned.

joe_t_allen@sbcglobal.net

I am currently listening to "Midnight Moonlight." Perhaps I am sounding like some old geezer on the threshold of 50. However, I like to judge the firm on its own merits, not comparing it to either Zeppelin or Bad Company for that matter. When doing that, I must say it was very enjoyable music; both albums. But one thing stated on this page is accurate, that cover of "You Lost That Loving Feeling" was pretty bad.

amoy3r@gmail.com (Aaron)

Wait... this isn't reviews of the hip hop group that featured rap sensations Nasir 'Nas' Jones, Foxy Brown, AZ, and Nature????????

Drunk

Add your thoughts?

Radioactive 12" - Atlantic 1985

seven.jpg

Let me ask you a question. What do you think is the best part of the song "Radioactive"?

If you answered "that weird dissonant guitar break," congratulations! You're in the 100th percentile! Which makes it all the more bizarre that when (Jimmy) Page and Paul (Rodgers) decided to issue an extended dance version (or "Special Mix") of the song, that's the one part of the track that they deliberately downplayed and nearly phased out completely. Instead, we get echoed drums, instrumental run-throughs of the verse and chorus (followed by the actualverses and choruses), a new guitar solo, hip echoey samples of Paul saying 'Radioactive,' dopey fake horns, an echoed bass break -- and EVENTUALLY after like FORTY-FIVE MINUTES, a sort of buried, hidden, subdued mix of the dissonant guitar break. Thanks assholes!

Dammit, you know what I just realized? I thanked assholes but completely forget to thank my wife. Fuck! I'm no better than Hilary Swank! (though I do have less hideously overgrown teeth)

Side two is more interesting, some say, with live Hammersmith Odeon December 9th, 1984 versions of what were at the time a solo Jimmy Page track and a solo Paul Rodgers song. Isn't that interesting? God, that's why I forked out the $1.08 for this record in the first place! First is "City Sirens," which you of course know from Jimmy Page's Death Wish II soundtrack. It's easy to see why they chose to cover this one, as it sounds exactly like a Firm song even in its original rendition (with vocals by Gordon Edwards! Did you hear me? Gordon "Fuckin'" Edwards!!!!) (actually it was probably the Gordon Edwards from the Pretty Things, which is kinda interesting since he was the bass player, not the singer). It's a catchy little song but repetitive as hell, along the lines of "Someone To Love" from the LP. And finally the musical explosion in vinyl form concludes with a precursory version of "Live In Peace," which was at the time just another non-hit from Paul Rodgers' solo album Cut Loose (which means that those four or five people cheering when the piano riff starts up actually own Paul Rodgers' solo album Cut Loose). I love "Live In Peace." It's so dramatic! And bombastic! And pompous! It alone saves this otherwise interesting but slightly disappointing release. Of course, now you can just buy the second Firm album and hear it there, so fuck it. You kno what? Fuck the whole fucking thing!

I learned the 'f' word from Fred Durst and now I can't get enough of fucking it!

Actually, maybe I should have put it somewhere else in that particular sentence. Sounds a bit oddly sexual in its current placement.

I learned the 'f' word from fucking Fred Durst and now I can't get enough of it! There, much better.

Add your thoughts?

Mean Business - Atlantic 1986

eight.jpg

This'll make your backflip sproke: The second Firm album is better than the final Led Zeppelin album. I'm serial! In Through The Out Door is nobody's favorite record - it's a bunch of piano crap and old people music. So The Firm's second album is already heads above its competition. But even better, they've improved since their first record, and the sure sign of a band on the way to the top is marked improvement from first to second record (other examples include Radiohead, Meat Loaf and The English Beat). I'll admit that this is an extremely LOW 8, and could easily drop to a 7 at any second, depending on my mood. But right now I really have to say that I personally enjoy it quite a bit. There are a few bad ideas (the pointless key modulation - not to mention the weak riff - of "Free To Live"'s chorus; the endless gospel ending to the otherwise beautiful "Spirit Of Love," the dated-within-seconds '80s synths in "All The King's Horses"), but not a single bad song. And best of all -- no "Unchained Melody" cover!

For Jimmy Page and Paul Rodgers' The Firm, improvement comes in many ways, many of which I will eludicate for you right now. First of all, they actually sound like a BAND now, instead of Jimmy Page playing the guitar and Paul Rodgers singing while some guy rubs erasers on his dick and a lobomotized giraffe beats on a box. The songwriting, playing and production (thanks to Julian Mendelsohn helping Page and Singerguy behind the board) are all equally improved. On the rhythm section side, Chris is playing much more interesting beats and breaks, and Tony has lowered both the tone and the volume of his fretless bass, resulting in kind of a sweetly sickening woozy slidin'-a-round bottom to the guitar riffery, combined with some incredibly smart and busy fretwork back there in the shadows where a bassist belongs. Paul's still doing his always reliable Paul thing -- sure, he's not as gravelly sexxxy as he was in his bearded Free days, but at least he hasn't turned into a snivelling mustachio like Burton Cummings. And Jimmy has left behind the 13-year-old's chord sequences for much more interesting approaches across the board, particularly in "Cadillac," a goopy oogly sludgy mess of wah-wah-drenched low-end feedback, icky dirty "wrong" chords and chorused distorted lower-than-gumption noise that harkens back to those halcyon days of "For Your Life"! Remember those halcyon days? God, that cabin we rented.

More generally, even if Led Zeppelin fans find it too radio-friendly and mid-80sy to touch, fans of classic Bad Company should really dig this record. It's as good as ANYTHING Bad Company ever did (aside from the debut), doesn't sound at all like a demo, and runs the preferred hard rock diversity gamut from speedy messy goodtime blues-rock to piano/keyboard minor-key overdrama to easy-to-love warm pop rock to gigantic pretty bombastic gospel explosion, all with expert instrumentation and vocalizing on everybody's part. It even includes a Tony Franklin composition (!), revealing his muse to be strange jazz-influenced note licks that slow down and speed up for almost no reason at all (at one point slipping from two-repetitions-per-line to three-repetitions-per-line, leaving non-observant listeners wondering why the hell the song started feeling so sluggish all of a sudden).

The key to the entire release is an honest feel of true musician's camaraderie combined with pretty much the strongest songwriting and playing you're going to get from ex-'70s rockers this far past their prime. I can't promise that anybody else in the world will like it as much as I do, but that's why I make 75 grand a year and you wash ducks for a living.

That was a low blow. I'm sorry. Yes, I know they're swans. I was just being defensive because I know I'm going to catch hell for loving an album by The Firm. This is almost as bad as that time I gave an Everclear album a 10!

Reader Comments

bigfunchy@databasix.com (Russell B.)

Relax, Prindle. You're not going to catch hell for loving an album by The Firm. You're going to catch hell for loving a fucking shitty album by The Firm.

I still have a very clear memory of being on my way to school one fine spring morning in 1986 when "Free to Live" came on the radio, and I thought to myself, "Boy, I'm glad I'm a punk rocker, instead of a mindless consumer of corporate 'rock' music like most of my fellow students are on this fine spring morning in 1986, because otherwise I would have to pretend to like this fucking shitty lifeless 'rock' song and others similar to it! Also, although as a punk rocker I often make a display of not being hung up on money, I am nevertheless acutely aware of what a great deal I'll be getting this weekend when I spend six bucks to go to a punk gig at Fenders Ballroom and see bands that I actually like, while my fellow students spend hundreds of dollars to go to the prom, during which they will surely be forced to endure hours of such shitty, lame-assed 'rock' music as 'Free to Live' by the fucking Firm!"

Or words to that effect.

dakesh@gmail.com

Prindle, you are dead-on about that horrendous fretless bass crap Tony Franklin plays on these Firm albums, but you're trying to say that Satisfaction Guaranteed is a great song and In Through the Out Door is a crappy Zep album? That Mean Business is better than ITTOD? You are out of your freakin' mind, man. I saw the video for Satisfaction Guaranteed on VH1 classic recently and was like "why the hell would anyone make this a single and how would any network actually air this?" That song is so guilty of your complaint about Chris Slade hitting a drum like every five seconds, only worse - the entire BAND touches their instruments every five seconds! That song is so slow it is sheer drudgery, with the most cliche, unimaginative (note redundancy for emphasis) lyrics ever written since the earthly days of our Lord and Saviour (outside of all Spanish language pop music which has about 5 song titles about "corazones" and "bailando" and shit).

Onto ITTOD, what do think, Presence is better? That was a great comeback album thanks to one John Paul Jones from that clunker that came before it, whose only redeeming value was in "Achilles Last Stand" which you probably hate for the same reasons you hate Rush. Hold on, let me check your Zep reviews a minute...

ok, what's this. You LIKE "Achilles Last Stand"? We AGREE on that? Hell, you ought to check out Rush's Hemispheres again and put the high pitched vocals aside much as I did in coming to like Smashing Pumpkins. And you gave ITTOD an 8? Then why are you ripping on it in your Firm reviews? You are a strange, complicated man, Mark Prindle! Oh and hey world, "Nobody's Fault But Mine" sucks. Enough "ah-uh ah-uh ah-uh" already, start singing the fucking song.

byronmoore@hotmail.com

dude, but what about the band The Law, starrig Kenny Jones and Paul Rodgers and Chris Rea and David Gilmour and Bryan Adams!!

MiThm105@aol.com

Dude, your arrogant and have horrible taste in music..if you knew anything, you wouldn't knock The Firm so badly...yeah it wasn't the greatest thing but it was better than 99.9 percent of the 80's music....Let me guess, you must Love Motley Crue????

Edited by juxtiphi

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Here is another page that mentions it but doesnt have any quotes from Paul on it.

http://zeegrooves.blogspot.com/2011/04/firm-radioactive.html

While the video shows Jimmy Page playing the lead on his cherry red Gibson 12/6 string double neck SG model guitar, he did not play the highly unusual lead guitar run on this recording. Vocalist Paul Rodgers played the lead that has been both praised and panned by critics everywhere. I like it as it is unusual. I tried figuring it out, but had difficulty in doing so and am amazed that no one has a tablature available for this solo or a YouTube video showing you how to play it.

Here is another one that mentions this,

http://www.guitarworld.com/100_worst_guitar_solos?page=0%252C4,3

77 THE FIRM
“Radioactive”
The Firm (1985)
GUITARIST: Paul Rodgers

In a move perverse enough to horrify even Aleister Crowley, Jimmy Page decided to let Paul Rodgers play the guitar solo on their new band’s debut single. If you listen closely, you can almost hear Page laughing hysterically in the background as Rodgers clams up a storm.

One more,

http://www.utopiaartists.com/bio_paul_rodgers.htm

After leaving Bad Company, early in '84, Paul released his much anticipated first solo CD Cut Loose. He composed all of the music and played all of the instruments, making it a solo album in the truest sense of the word. He joined forces with friend and fellow rocker, Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin, and The Firm was born. This union produced two successful tours and two equally successful albums,The Firm and Mean Business, with radio hits "Radioactive"on which Paul played the guitar solo, "Satisfaction Guaranteed" and in the UK "All The King's Horses".

Here is another , http://rocklegendscruise.com/artists/paul-rodgers/

Most fans know that Paul wrote “Radioactive”, not many know that he played the guitar solo. - See more at: http://rocklegendscruise.com/artists/paul-rodgers/#sthash.1e0KlIm4.dpuf

I cannot find an interview where Paul confirms this

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Source? I find that hard to believe, although anything is certainly possible. Some proof could convince me.

I was pretty surprised too, when I found out. Right now, I can't remember exactly where I read that Paul played it but I'm pretty sure it was in the Brad Tolinski book on Page called "Light and Shade".

There is a section in the book where Tolinski talks to Rodgers about the Firm. I don't own the book but I'm going to try to get it from the library again to confirm.

Edited by ledsox

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I was pretty surprised too, when I found out. Right now, I can't remember exactly where I read that Paul played it but I'm pretty sure it was in the Brad Tolinski book on Page called "Light and Shade".

There is a section in the book where Tolinski talks to Rodgers about the Firm. I don't own the book but I'm going to try to get it from the library again to confirm.

Well, it certainly seems possible, based on the above info. I am surprised and disappointed at the same time. I always thought that his guitar work on Radioactive was very unique, and a credit to his versatility, but that is now in jeopardy. Thanks for the info.

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Well, it certainly seems possible, based on the above info. I am surprised and disappointed at the same time. I always thought that his guitar work on Radioactive was very unique, and a credit to his versatility, but that is now in jeopardy. Thanks for the info.

His guitar work and legacy is in jeopardy (in your opinion) over one guitar phrase/solo?

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His guitar work and legacy is in jeopardy (in your opinion) over one guitar phrase/solo?

Please read it again. I was discussing to his work on Radioactive, which I specifically referenced. I did not reference his full body of work. Through strength and determination, I have not let Jimmy's faux pas destroy my 35 year love of his works.

Edited by The Dark Lord

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Well, it certainly seems possible, based on the above info. I am surprised and disappointed at the same time. I always thought that his guitar work on Radioactive was very unique, and a credit to his versatility, but that is now in jeopardy. Thanks for the info.

Yeah, I'm quite disappointed too, always thought it was Page's lead and how interesting it was, but perhaps this new info can explain why it sounds different. Anyway, I never thought much of basically anything Page did on those two rather bland mid '80s releases...

Edited by Incubus

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I agree. That song sucks; especially the weird guitar parts. ;)

Its ok, Pure radio fodder that's all. It just goes to show that adding Jimmy Page to anything makes it an instant classic whether he wrote it or not.

Edited by juxtiphi

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Its ok, Pure radio fodder that's all. It just goes to show that adding Jimmy Page to anything makes it an instant classic whether he wrote it or not.

I used to really like it til Paul Rogers stole the guitar credit :). I might add that there has been no definitive proof of the claim as yet, although the anecdotal evidence is persuasive.

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I never liked that guitar solo in Radioactive, it reminds me of the solo in Dirty Laundry. Just sounds like some bad Dorian scales to me.

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Dark Lord, you ignorant slut. There's finally a thread for the great lost song Fire and you use it to grandstand a crackpot theory about some phantom Jimmy Page misstep. Maybe you should find a Radioactive thread to fall apart in. But first, isn't it the very riff you're complaining about now that you thought connected Radioactive to Fire?

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