Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
apantherfrommd

Jimmy Page Vs Robbie Williams

Recommended Posts

http://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/london-life/mansion-attacks-how-do-the-superhomes-of-robbie-williams-and-jimmy-page-measure-up-9982472.html

So I see - £2000, unbelievable.

What seems even more unbelievable is that the Tower House sold for £75,000 in 1970 and then for £350,000 just two years later - is that possible?

The house was purchased in 1970 in dire need of restoration. Richard Harris purchased it and restored it based on the original architectural documents. That's where the $275k upcharge came from.

I bought a historic home once and attempted to restore it. Worse than a boat - a hole in the floor to pour money into. JP was wise to sit back and wait for some other poor schmuck to sink his cash into a major project like that.

Edited by Morgan Rudolph

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something I noted when recently sauntering down Melbury Road, a distinctly aesthetically unedifying vehicular carbuncle in the guise of a Smart car was ensconced in front of The Tower House's garage door.
Now come on Jimmy, let's have a level playing field, if I was Robbie Williams I'd file a formal complaint with the London Borough of Kensington & Chelsea that a car of a lesser calibre than an Aston Martin was parked in full public view in The Tower House's garage forecourt. And while we are on the subject, i can't imagine that garage was an original feature....

Cheers,

Indi

Edited by indigomoonbeam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those of you who are architecturally-minded may find this link of interest:

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vol37/pp126-150#h3-0010

Scroll about 70% down the page and you will find an entry for Tower House: No. 29 Melbury Road; the text is as follows and I have pasted the illustrations at the foot of the article:

----------------------------------

Tower House: No. 29 Melbury Road

Plates 81b, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89; figs. 29–30

This house, numbered 9 until 1967, was designed by the architect William Burges for his own occupation. Burges began to make drawings for the house in July 1875, but his initial designs differed in some ways from those executed. In particular, the staircase turret, which is the dominant feature of the street front and gives the house its name, did not appear on the first plan. By the end of the year, however, Burges had decided on the present form of the house. No doubt with his designs for Castell Coch still fresh in mind, he placed the stairs in a circular tower crowned by a conical cap of slate. A building agreement was concluded with the Earl of Ilchester in December 1875 and building began in 1876. The contractors were Ashby Brothers of Kingsland Road and the basic cost was estimated to be £6,000. Burges was granted a lease in February 1877 for ninety years from 1875 at an annual ground rent of £50 for the first two years and £100 thereafter. (fn. 105)

The design stems from French domestic Gothic of the thirteenth century derived through the influence of Viollet-le-Duc. It makes use of themes explored and developed in Burges's work at Cardiff for the Marquess of Bute. The materials used are a hard red brick with stone dressings and grey slates in diminishing courses for the roof. There are two principal storeys over a basement and a commodious garret in the roof. The three main living-rooms on the ground floor form an L-shaped block with a square entrance hall in the angle, facing south and east. The circular staircase tower, flanked by a small gabled wing, is placed in front of the hall and approached from it through a pair of pointed arches. A double porch serves both the main entrance and the garden door behind it.

The street front (Plate 85a) is characterized by a striking association of the steep principal gable and the stair turret. The ground and first floors of the house are marked by storey-and sill-bands and in general there are moulded stone dressings to the eaves and gables of the roof, the chimney stacks being finished in moulded brick. The larger windows have stone mullions and transoms with square or cusped heads to the lights but some of the smaller openings are arched in brick or have plain stone lintels. The stone porch has square piers with carved capitals (the first pier was intended to be embellished with further carving) and a deep entablature with an arcaded cornice.

On the garden front (Plate 85b) the western part is again gabled, matching the gable to the street, the centre line of this element being emphasized by a stepped buttress which divides the pair of windows lighting the library. These have finely carved lintels and, like the dining-room windows on the front, emphatically modelled mullions to the side of the library is a larger enclosed by glazed screens, is incomplete in its decoration but has a mosaic floor depicting Pinkie, Burges's favourite dog. The entrance hall, to which access is gained through a heavy bronze-covered door with figure-subjects in relief panels, rises through two storeys to terminate in a painted ceiling based on the emblems of the constellations arranged according to their positions at the time of the first occupation of the house. The hall has a fine mosaic floor representing a labyrinth in the centre of which Theseus slays the Minotaur. Above plain dados the walls are painted as stone, with scarlet joints in simulation of ashlaring, and over the doorways to each of the major rooms are painted emblems appropriate to their use. Figures representing day and night appear in painted aedicules at gallery level on either side of the hall. The fire-hood opposite to the entrance door is more severely treated than those in other rooms, being simply lined out with scarlet jointing. The garden door into the porch is, like the front door, bronze covered, this time with a relief of the Madonna and Child.

According to Burges's brother-in-law, R. P. Pullan, the decorative scheme in the dining-room letters of the alphabet are incorporated—with the exception of H, which has been 'dropped' on to the onyx below the frieze. In the ceiling the founders of systems of theology and law are seen, and on the doors of the bookcases which surround the room is an illustrated alphabet of architecture and the visual arts with a scene of artists and craftsmen at their work on each lettered door. Pictures of birds by H. Stacy Marks are incorporated into the backs of the bookcase doors. Where visible the walls of the room are painted with a diaper pattern and above the bookcase runs a continuous deep modelled and gilded frieze of formalized foliage.

Figure 29: Tower House, Melbury Road, plans

A wide opening opposite the library fireplace, furnished with sliding doors and a central pair of marble columns, leads into one end of the drawing-room. The execution of the decorative scheme here seems to have been incomplete at the time of Burges's death although drawings had been prepared, and cartoons appear pinned to the walls and ceiling in the photographs taken to illustrate the description of the house by R. P. Pullan in 1885 (Plate 86a). The theme in the drawing-room is 'the tender passion of Love' and the chimney-piece, a fine counterpart to the one in the library, is carved with figures from Chaucer's Roman de la Rose. Recently the scheme originally designed for the walls and ceiling has been executed from Burges's drawings. The three windows with their original stained glass are set in deep reveals with marble linings and ornamented with ball-flower enrichments.

Back in the hall the stair is approached through the two pointed arches divided by a marble column with a carved capital and base. The stained glass in the windows of the stair turret represents 'the Storming of the Castle of Love' and the wall treatment of the entrance hall continues for the whole height of the stair.

Off the first-floor gallery with its turned wood balustrade the two main bedrooms and the armoury are approached. In the guest room on the street front the theme is 'the Earth and its productions' (Plate 87a). The ceiling here is painted with fleur-de-lis and butterfly designs and a convex mirror in a gilded surround is placed at the crossing of the main beams along which are painted frogs and mice. The frieze of flowers growing au natural within a Gothic arcade, once obliterated, has been repainted in the recent renovations.

Burges's own bedroom overlooking the garden is decorated with 'the Sea and its inhabitants' (Plate 87b). The elaborate ceiling (Plate 88b), divided into panels by painted and gilded beams and semi-shafts, is set with tiny convex mirrors within gilt stars. Below the level of the corbels is a deep frieze with fish and eels swimming amongst formalized waves. The frieze to the chimney-piece also depicts fish amongst waves, this time carved in relief, whilst above, on the fire-hood, a vigorously modelled mermaid gazes into a looking-glass (Plate 89b). Sea-shells, coral, seaweed and a mer-baby are also represented.

Figure 30: Tower House, Melbury Road, elevations and sections

The large room over the drawing-room originally housed Burges's collection of armour and was known in his time as the armoury. It now contains little of interest beyond the carved chimneypiece with a crocketed gable rising in front of the hood and three roundels carved with medieval versions of Venus, Juno and Minerva.

The storey in the roof, now somewhat altered, contained rooms known as the day and night nurseries although Burges had no family and remained a bachelor to the end of his life). Two interesting chimneypieces still survive, however. One represents 'Jack and the Beanstalk', with Jack supporting the mantelshelf whilst the giant's head and hands appear to tear through the stonework above. On the other are three monkeys at play.

The interior decorations were carried out by a small army of artists and craftsmen over several years and were still unfinished at Burges's death in 1881. The names of the specialist firms and individuals who executed the work can be found in the architect's own estimate book for the years 1875 to 1881, which contains over one hundred items relating to Tower House. (fn. 106) Burges appears only occasionally to have recorded alternative estimates for the same piece of work, and the craftsmen who worked at Tower House are in the main those who had worked, or were still working, for him on other projects, particularly Cardiff Castle. All of the stone carving, from the elaborate chimneypieces to capitals and corbels, was done by the sculptor Thomas Nicholls. Burke and Company of Regent Street were the principal contractors for the marble and mosaic work, and Simpson and Sons of the Strand supplied and fixed many of the decorative tiles. The bronze work for the great doors was undertaken by John Ayres Hatfield. The carpenter who was apparently responsible for all the woodwork in the house, from the joinery to the new items of furniture made to Burges's specifications, was John Walden of Maiden Lane, Covent Garden. The figure painting on the library bookcases and elsewhere was by Fred Weekes and Henry Stacy Marks, from whom Burges ordered seventy birds' heads at £1 apiece. Saunders and Company of Endell Street, Long Acre, made the stained glass, several of the cartoons for which were provided by H. W. Lonsdale. Most of the painted decorations were executed by Campbell and Smith of Southampton Row. By 1879, however, other estimates were being taken for decorative work, particularly in the guest room, including from 'Fisher', perhaps of the firm of Harland and Fisher, decorative specialists used by Burges in the past. (fn. 9)

Some of Burges's decorations were painted over in the years following his death, and from 1962 until 1966 the house remained unoccupied and was damaged by vandals. Restoration began in 1966 with the aid of grants from the Greater London Council and the Ministry of Housing and Local Government. In 1969 Mr. Richard Harris acquired the house and further extensively restored the internal decoration. The firm which had largely carried out the original painted decorations, now Campbell, Smith and Company Limited, was the principal specialist contractor employed. It proved possible to restore damaged and obliterated decorations and to finish parts of the scheme which had not been completed at the time of Burges's death from his own drawings.

fig31.gif

Figure 29: Tower House, Melbury Road, plans

fig32.gif

Figure 30: Tower House, Melbury Road, elevations and sections

----------------------------------

Cheers,

Indi

Edited by indigomoonbeam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something I noted when recently sauntering down Melbury Road, a distinctly aesthetically unedifying vehicular carbuncle in the guise of a Smart car was ensconced in front of The Tower House's garage door.

Now come on Jimmy, let's have a level playing field, if I was Robbie Williams I'd file a formal complaint with the London Borough of Kensington & Chelsea that a car of a lesser calibre than an Aston Martin was parked in full public view in The Tower House's garage forecourt. And while we are on the subject, i can't imagine that garage was an original feature....

Cheers,

Indi

It has been years since I last seen Tower House and I don't recall the garage, but could it once have been a carriage house or stable? It doesn't show on the plans so probably an addition. Smart car? Jimmy doesn't drive but yes an Aston or at least a Jag, I mean, to fit it. Nothing wrong with a Bentley! lol But if Jimmy is "green", it wouldn't hurt my feelings either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe that smart car is Scarlett's? If she happened to move in with him, I could see that.

On a second note, was that the Tower House Jimmy was in during It Might Get Loud when he was air guitaring to Rumble? I always wondered where that was shot.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LnyY3rJoaZ4

Edited by lcondo123

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I find most disagreeable about Williams plans is the addition of a large window overlooking the garden and pool area of the Tower house and the removing of the dividing wall and landscaping between the two houses. That seems like a puposeful intrusion into a neighbor's privacy for no other reason than to invite the controversy that is taking place now.

I hadn't considered this angle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...The Tower House's garage forecourt. And while we are on the subject, i can't imagine that garage was an original feature....

It was an addition to the original building...I'll have to dig to get an approximate date.

What I find most disagreeable about Williams plans is the addition of a large window overlooking the garden and pool area of the Tower house and the removing of the dividing wall and landscaping between the two houses. That seems like a puposeful intrusion into a neighbor's privacy for no other reason than to invite the controversy that is taking place now.

Unless I've missed something I'm not aware of any plans to remove a dividing wall nor landscaping between the two houses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Williams submitted additional plans this week that would call for much more significant excavation work: the net result would double the square footage of the mansion. Interesting enough, he has not out right purchased the property, but rather has a lease/rent hold.

^^^

He must be out of his mind! He's worst than rich American slobs who build McMansion's in quiet three bedroom communities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How can you make such severe changes to a leased property without the owners application? I'm aware of leasehold improvements but this seems extreme.

The additional plans look more like a hotel than a private residence. Why doesn't Williams look to a neighbourhood that can accommodate such square footage and save himself a headache. Surely Chelsea council will veto such drastic changes to a Grade II building?

Michael Winner seems like he was a really kind person. Words os wisdom there, spend more time with your parents. Thank goodness mine liked LZ...... and taught us to play nicely with the neighbours!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IpMan   

I certainly hope they don't do things in Chelsea like they do in the States. Over here (USA) you grease a few blokes on the city council and you can build yourself a Neverland Ranch any damn place you want.

If I were Jimmy, I would hedge my bet so to speak. Inform the city council he intends to donate a large sum of money for some public building restoration project or something, have the press pick it up and get the news out there. That way greased palms or not, the Chelsea city council would have some "splainin to do" as to a: why they approved such an obtrusive and obnoxious project; and b: why would the city council go against a long term resident deeply involved and invested in the community for the sake of some newcomer trying to desecrate the architecture and historical value of the area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jimmy with author Matthew Williams at the Tower House, who wrote a book on the work of William Burgess. Besides the Tower House, Burges was also involved in renovations at Cardiff Castle in Wales. The roof of the arab room is shown in the second photo.

Hi yellowrose, I believe the photo was taken at Cardiff Castle itself, though annoyingly I can't find where I read it. I also visited Cardiff Castle many years ago and the photo you posted looks like that.

But I did find this:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/south_east/3730777.stm

Good luck to Jimmy, and huge credit to him for taking on the great mantle of responsibility involved in caring for the Tower House.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... Why doesn't Williams look to a neighbourhood that can accommodate such square footage and save himself a headache...

Good question. If he wants that much square footage he should probably look for a property in one of the outer boroughs or even outside Greater London.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jimmy with author Matthew Williams at the Tower House, who wrote a book on the work of William Burgess.

That photo was actually taken at the book launch held at Cardiff Castle on May 19, 2004.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
scylla   

Good question. If he wants that much square footage he should probably look for a property in one of the outer boroughs or even outside Greater London.

He should head for Bishop's Avenue, natural home of those with a hell of a lot of money and no taste at all.

3402462872_zpsib85jhcc-1.jpg

The%20Bishops%20Avenue%202_zpshfiqsjct-1

Carlton%20House_zpsdcwvjt3p-1.jpg

article-2550623-1B279E6900000578-953_634

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cannot see how this will get the go ahead. Didn't Robert run into trouble with replacing his windows. Even modest properties have restrictions. Also this could go on for years with appeals and counter applications.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know enough about restrictions for Grade I or II listed buildings but if it is typical of most heritage type properties, wouldn't the extensive work planned for William's home be under restrictions and therefore scrutiny? Jimmy has spent a good deal of money for expert advice and reports. You must have deep pockets for this fight!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go Jimmy!!!! :-)

Jimmy Page Claims Victory in Neighborhood Dispute
by Nick DeRiso March 6, 2015 1:37 PM
Jimmy-Page-630x420.jpg

Jimmy Page has apparently won a community argument with Robbie Williams over a proposed underground extension at his pop-star neighbor’s central London home.

Page asserted in a letter to the local city council that Williams’ massive renovation could cause dangerous vibrations that might damage Page’s nearby residence, known as the Tower House.

Williams has now withdrawn his renovation plans, according to the Daily Mail.

Just how big were those plans? Williams, who purchased the Woodland House from film director and food critic Michael Winner in 2013, wanted to build a new two-story subterranean extension beneath the 46-room Victorian mansion. It was to measure 3,600 square feet.

In Page’s letter, he said “similar schemes have been carried out on other properties in the area locally — and each time the level of vibration cause during the works has caused concern about the effect on decorative finished in the Tower House. The work now proposed to Woodland House is much nearer than other major excavations carried out so far, and the consequences for the building fabric and decorative finished of the Tower House may well be catastrophic if this project is allowed to proceed.”

Page also hired two architectural experts who bolstered the opinion that Tower House is too historically important to risk nearby development.

The guitarist’s home has already been granted a Grade I listing by the U.K.’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport — meaning it’s recognized as a structure “of exceptional interest.” Page lived there since the height of his former band Led Zeppelin‘s fame, back in 1972.

Even as this dust-up with Williams unfolded, Page completed an expansion of his own, as he oversaw a deluxe reissue of Zeppelin’s ‘Physical Grafitti’ last month that included a bonus disc of material.

http://ultimateclassicrock.com/jimmy-page-robbie-williams-dispute/


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mook   

With Page's money I don't get why the hell he lives in England. Crowded as hell and insane taxes. He should have asked "The Edge" during the making of "It Might get Loud" for advice. Edge is smart and bought some beautiful properties in Malibu California.

I do get the history of the house and the William Burges connection; it's a beautiful place. But when clowns like Robbie Williams can have the means to buy in your area? Time to ramble on. Lol.

Are there no clowns in California?

Maybe he loves England because it's his home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great that he's won! It strikes a blow against all the unthinking redevelopment which is happening in London at the moment . And is utterly to Jimmy's credit as far as the Tower House is concerned.

However this victory is due to the plans being withdrawn : had the council been allowed to judge in Jimmy's favour, it might have set a stronger precedent.

What will Robbie do next ? Give up and sell up ? Or was this a strategic withdrawal: will he be back with new proposals ?

I have a feeling this one will run and run ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×