Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
The Pagemeister

Robert Plant Announces New ‘Carry Fire’ LP, Debuts ‘The May Queen’ Single

Recommended Posts

Watch Robert Plant's reaction to 8-year-old girl playing Led Zeppelin on drums

The jaw-dropping video of the young girl went viral — then we showed it to the legendary Zep frontman

 


Last week a video of eight-year-old Japanese drummer Yoyoka Soma playing Led Zeppelin on drums went viral — and now Robert Plant is reacting to her incredible performance.

Yoyoka Soma has been drumming since she was two years old, and by five had formed a band, Kaneaiyoyoka, with her musically-minded parents. But it was a video contest entry for Hit Like a Girl, an international drumming contest for female percussionists, that put her on the world stage.

In it, she drums along to the Led Zeppelin classic "Good Times Bad Times," and it's astounding to watch. The video has since garnered more than 2.5 million views.

But what does Led Zeppelin co-founder and front man think? When he stepped into the q studio with Tom Power, we had to ask.

"Listen to that," says Plant, amazed as he watches the video. "And the thing is, it's like falling off a log for her." He also says what the late Zeppelin drummer John Bonham would think if he could see it.

 

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/q/blog/watch-robert-plant-s-reaction-to-8-year-old-girl-playing-led-zeppelin-on-drums-1.4710849

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^First posted yesterday in the "Simply Incredible - Bonham would be proud" thread, a little later yesterday was posted in the "Led Zeppelin or related on Youtube" thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, luvlz2 said:

^^First posted yesterday in the "Simply Incredible - Bonham would be proud" thread, a little later yesterday was posted in the "Led Zeppelin or related on Youtube" thread.

She’s got a future in playing in the tribute act circuit. Hopefully she’ll continue to enjoy music (either as a hobby or as a paid musician). 

R😎👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many people here really think there would even be a Robert Plant without Led Zeppelin? 

I for one, do not think Robert would have garnered half the notoriety he has today without being part of Led Zeppelin. Jimmy, Jones, and Bonham would all have been famous in one way or another, Jimmy for guitar and Bonham drums and Jones making waves in other areas of music. They may might not have been Zeppelin famous but they would have fared far better than Plant.

Robert would have been just another singer. The only reason he has any real fame today is due to his work with Zeppelin which is strong enough to carry his fire into perpetuity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, hummingbird69 said:

How many people here really think there would even be a Robert Plant without Led Zeppelin? 

I for one, do not think Robert would have garnered half the notoriety he has today without being part of Led Zeppelin. Jimmy, Jones, and Bonham would all have been famous in one way or another, Jimmy for guitar and Bonham drums and Jones making waves in other areas of music. They may might not have been Zeppelin famous but they would have fared far better than Plant.

Robert would have been just another singer. The only reason he has any real fame today is due to his work with Zeppelin which is strong enough to carry his fire into perpetuity.

He absolutely would have been known - is voice was too amazing and unique for it not to have been. What sort of band he would have ended up in is hard to say. It's just exhausting to see yet another comment like this, insinuating he owes his life to Page blah blah blah when it's just not true. You could make the claim all four of them may not have been as successful had they not all met and decided to work together. The strength of that band is the combination of all of them equally. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

French interview, google translate

https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=http://www.leparisien.fr/paris-75/robert-plant-les-chansons-de-led-zeppelin-sont-plus-fun-a-jouer-aujourd-hui-22-07-2018-7829868.php

 

Robert Plant: "Led Zeppelin songs are more fun to play today"

Ile-de-France & Oise > Paris | Michel Valentin | July 22, 2018, 11:11 pm

The former singer of the legendary rock band is visiting France for three concerts, including this Monday in Paris. Almost 70 years old, he still has fun.

He plays this Sunday at the Vieilles Charrues , Monday evening Salle Pleyel in Paris, and on the 25th at the festival of Carcassonne (Aude). While celebrating his 70th birthday next August, Robert Plant remains creative and eager to share his joie de vivre on stage. We joined him by phone in his Breton hotel to talk about his current career, but also the group that made him known, a certain Led Zeppelin, which is expected an illustrated book and a reissue of the live "The Song Remains The Same "for the end of the year.

You play this Sunday in the largest French festival (70 000 people per day) and Monday Pleyel Hall in Paris (3000 seats). What are the advantages and disadvantages of a festival and a normal hall?

ROBERT PLANT. It's like on the Richter scale. By seeing what kind of environment we are going to have, what sort of building, infrastructure, we can say how things are going to be. We adapt our music according to the place, festival or hall. Besides, I choose the rooms where we play.

 

The Pleyel Room was recommended to me. I wanted to give a show in Paris, but I also want to continue exploring, and I have already performed in so many places in your capital. And, if I aim too high, I may not sell all the tickets, so I prefer to stay in smaller, but also more intimate.

You give two concerts in two days, another in three days, you do not spare your voice!

No. I can not complain. It seems that the more I use it ... (He pauses to clear his throat and resumes, in a tone of derision) ... The sea air is extraordinary here in Roscoff ... No, if my voice works , everything is fine. If it does not work, we do something else.

Your latest album, "Carry Fire", goes beyond rock, pop or folk. There are musical atmospheres from different countries, even continents ...

Yes. We are 7 on the album and on stage, we each have different tastes and interests, we are not trying to make our "world music" (Editor's note: he says it in French) . The musicians are younger than me, but they are not kids either, they are not born of the last rain.

There is trip hop in Massive Attack, Justin Adams, guitarist, brings with him his work with Tinariwen, Jah Wobble or what he did in Algeria or Morocco. Skin, also guitarist comes from a brit-pop band; Cast. Billy Fuller, the bass player, plays in Beak, a derivative of Portishead. All this mixes naturally.

During your tours, you have already played in Mali, recently in Turkey ... Want to perform in as many countries as possible?

The first time we went to Turkey, we also went through Romania, Bulgaria. But the promoters put us rock bands in the first part. This is not what we wanted. We got instead gypsy music bands ...

On one of your tours with Led Zeppelin's former guitarist Jimmy Page, you performed with an Egyptian orchestra. Would you like to repeat this experience?

I am not sure. Everything was very repeated, programmed, it was always the same thing, because of the arrangements. What I play today allows greater freedom. I loved doing that at the time, but I prefer what I do today, it's more "wild" (in French).

Play seven with your group The Sensational Space Shifters allow you more freedom?

Yes, to me, but also to them. It is a kind of free expression, not like in contemporary jazz, but as a kind of regular progression.

Does the formula seem to work, since you regularly release albums?

Yes, it's a three-year cycle. Next October, I will play with Van Morrison at O2 in London, marking the end of 13 months of touring.

And after, holidays, then the writing of the next album?

Life is only vacation, you know, right? At the end of the year, it is cold and dark in Europe. It may be time to change the environment ... I write when I travel.

Critics of your latest albums often talk about you as a shaman. Does it suit you ?

I do not have a title to award me. I like the concept of shaman, but I do not fit the description. I like football, I like cycling, I love my life, I do not think I am particularly mysterious or profound. I think I'm just a traveler within multiple musical universes.

How did Chrissie Hynde from the Pretenders come to sing on your last album?

She intervenes on a song (note: "Bluebirds over the mountain", a cover of rockabilly singer Ersel Hickey) that I sang by car or walking in the street when I was 12 years old. I always thought she might have a second life in another era. So we worked on her rhythm, but I was aware that it was a walk for teens about insecurity, love, so I needed a female voice. So I called Chrissie.

In 2007, you released an entire album in collaboration with a singer, Alison Krauss. You could republish the experience?

This kind of album only works because you sing old songs. But sitting down and composing new songs for a female voice would be very difficult, and would take a lot of time.

A concert of Robert Plant without a reprise of Led Zeppelin, is it possible?

I did it in 1981 and 1982 (note: at the very beginning of his solo career) . I was suffering from the death of my friend (Ed: John Bonham, drummer Led Zeppelin, died in 1980) . Today, I am a stage artist. I have to create a kind of myth, or propagate it.

Nobody could have imagined, when you were writing your songs with Led Zeppelin, that fifty years later, people would still be applauding them on stage, right?

That no! And these songs, they are much more fun to play now than at the time. At the time, it was necessary to respect the score. Now they are moving into another dimension!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I nipped over to Paris for this show.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roberts choice of set list (heavy on Zep tunes), and his consistent, yet always changing (but respectful) excuses on why he does not want to reform Zep but remain a solo act does not speak volumes, it screams them from the rooftop. He is all but saying, in very respectful language of course, that it is not Zeppelin's music or legacy he is avoiding, it is Jimmy and JPJ. His vocal abilities and range are much better and stronger today than they were in 2007 at the O2 show and I believe Robert could easily perform the Zep canon live in a reformed Zep but...why? As a solo act he can still perform the songs, exactly as he wishes, yet does not have to put up with either Jimmy or JPJ or the expectation of an audience who comes to see Zeppelin.

People can claim Robert is being selfish, but it appears to me he is being both practical and his own man. Those are two things which he could never hope to do in a reformed Zeppelin.

IMO Robert is one of the very few extremely famous musicians who truly has it all and only a fool would give that up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Robert Plant delivers a magical night at the Pageant

By Daniel Durchholz, Special to the Post-Dispatch

5b965595c4c82.image.jpg

Over the years, the Pageant has seen its share of magical musical performances. Sunday night, it added another one as Robert Plant and the Sensational Space Shifters made good on a performance originally scheduled for LouFest, which was canceled.

Downsizing a concert meant to play to tens of thousands to a venue that holds 2,300 made the event special for those lucky enough to make it inside. Tickets for the rescheduled show sold out instantly.

Next door at Delmar Hall, the Head and the Heart played their rescheduled LouFest date as did a host of local bands earlier in the day at the Grandel Theatre’s "Sound of St. Louis" showcase. Saturday night, Jukebox the Ghost and Mt. Joy repaired to Delmar Hall while Tank and the Bangas and Scrub and Ace Ha were at Old Rock House.

Other events were held to help some of the LouFest vendors recoup their losses. St. Louis venues and music fans showed a lot of patience, generosity and enthusiasm as they stepped up to redeem what otherwise would have been a lost weekend.

Their resilience, and not the broken promises of the LouFest promoters, should be the story that’s told instead.

One thing that might have made Plant’s decision to play the Pageant easier: His band’s equipment was already there. The show was the first date on a new leg of the tour supporting his most recent album, 2017’s “Carry Fire,” and Plant had booked the room for Saturday so he and the Sensational Space Shifters could rehearse.

“We were coming this way anyway,” Plant joked a couple songs into his 90-minute set. “It’s a long way to come without doing anything fun.”

Early on, Plant promised to play new material as well as sate the Led Zeppelin fans in the crowd by “roll(ing) the stone back to see if some tablets come down from the hill.”

Which they did. But the secret of Plant’s long and successful post-Zep career is that he doesn’t play the classics by rote, but rather repurposes them in ways that make them fresh and new. His solo material, meanwhile, sounds of a piece with his past glories without being imitative of them.

Plant kicked off the evening with two “Carry Fire” tracks, “New World” and “The May Queen” spliced by “Turn It Up,” from his previous album, “lullaby and … the Ceaseless Roar.”

The singer was generous with the spotlight, giving it over to guitarists Justin Adams and Liam “Skin” Tyson as well as violinist Lillie Mae Rische, who goes by Lillie Mae and who opened the show before joining in for much of the headlining set.

A palpable shiver went through the crowd when a molten beat laid down by drummer John Blease gave way to the opening lyric of the Zep classic “Black Dog.” The crowd was so loud repeating back Plant’s “Ahh-ahh” call, that it momentarily cracked him up.

Another special moment followed with another Zep classic, the bucolic “Going to Calfornia,” a song Plant last played in St. Louis in an even smaller venue — the Sheldon — during his surprise appearance alongside Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle and others at 2016’s Lampedusa: Concert for Refugees benefit.

From there he moved back to his solo material with “Please Read the Letter” from “Raising Sand,” his multiple-Grammy-winning collaboration with Alison Krauss.

Plant made reference to making that album in Nashville, Tenn., and traveling to Memphis, where, he said, “all us British people have to go, make the sign of the cross and apologize” before moving on to Louisiana, home of Lead Belly, who wrote “Gallows Pole,” which Zeppelin had covered. Plant approached it this time as a hard-rock hoedown featuring Rische on fiddle and Tyson on banjitar.

“Carry Fire” then brought out the exotic Middle Eastern influences that are often present in Plant’s music.

But the real showstopper was a long, winding take on “Babe, I’m Gonna Leave You,” a folk cover that made its appearance on Led Zeppelin’s debut album a staggering 49 years ago. Tyson’s acoustic guitar stylings were featured throughout, but Plant, who is 70, still carries the song with his keening vocals.

Ending the set with the traditional “Little Maggie” and Bukka White’s classic blues “Fixin’ to Die,” Plant joked about his time making music with bluegrass musicians. “We all went to bed much earlier and sang really old (expletive) songs,” he said.

The encore was “Satan, Your Kingdom Must Come Down,” a spiritual Plant had covered on his “Band of Joy” album. For a moment, it veered into Zeppelin’s “In My Time of Dying.” He then sent Zep fans home happy with the indelible riff of “Whole Lotta Love” ringing in their ears, but still managed to put a new and novel spin on it by including a slice of the traditional sea shanty “Santianna” in its middle section.

Lillie Mae’s opening set of country and bluegrass tunes, mostly from her debut album, “Forever and Then Some,” made plain why Plant put her on the bill and tapped her to sit in with the Sensational Space Shifters.


https://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/reviews/robert-plant-delivers-a-magical-night-at-the-pageant/article_1530bbf0-740c-58aa-82ac-0b9f25be857b.html

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Saw Plant in Santa Fe last night....voice was in fine form....also in fine form were his comedic one-liners...some political commentary too....and something about no one over 30 should be playing rock music

4A5BA97E-D801-42B5-A510-B90051493133.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/29/2018 at 3:46 PM, ledded1 said:

I nipped over to Paris for this show.

 

Sorry lousy version and he needs 6 musicians to do what 3 used to do and better.

RP must be in possession of the biggest ego in rock music to want to be that in charge of, what is in effect 

a Zep tribute band . Other than the fact that is the only way to see one quarter of the band we all obsess about i just don't get it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think there's anything to 'get'.

If you like what he's doing, go and see him & buy the album. If not, don't bother.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Robert Plant talks Led Zeppelin, Greta Van Fleet and music history

Sep 19 2018 |  By Kyle Meredith

When you talk about powerful performers, it’s hard to beat Robert Plant. The former Led Zeppelin frontman returns to Louisville with his band the Sensational Space Shifters as one of the headliners of the Bourbon and Beyond festival. Expect to hear songs from his excellent new LP, Carry Fire, as well as a few classics from his Zeppelin days transformed for his present sound.

LEO: You’re extremely knowledgeable on this history of music, its styles and songs. Does that ever get in the way when you’re writing?
Robert Plant: No, I can’t think about it like that, because there’s no strict idiom at all that we’re coming from as a band. We don’t even think about it. It’s just the personality of the players, and the way we do it is that we’re not coming from any particular specific zone of music or influence. It’s just a kind of mix of everything that we all individually absorb. It’s like being a really cool chef or something, I suppose, or a magician. I’ve talked to people who say, ‘I love that North African rhythm stuff that you do.’ We always think, ‘Oh, that’s just part of what we do anyway, because we’ve been doing it for years and years,’ so it’s just part of the composition of our musical identity, I guess.

Your past is so closely tied with rock and roll. How important is that genre to you in this day?
Rock and roll kind of was Jerry Lee and Little Richard and Larry Williams and Fats Domino. What happened in the late ‘60s, you can’t call Big Brother and the Holding Company or Janis Joplin rock and roll. It was something else, and I think that we followed into the United States following people like Cream and whoever else was around in those days. Herman’s Hermits, perhaps? But whatever it was, we weren’t rock and roll — we were just a band that played some mean stuff, tough, really, really powerful stuff, which was called rock. And then when it got into the hands of the misconstrued, it became hard rock, so is somebody going to tell me that ‘Friends’ or ‘Battle of Evermore’ is hard rock? I don’t think so. I find the whole thing, all of it, right the way through from 1968 to now, it’s just making music.

Have you heard Greta Van Fleet? That’s someone with your throat right there.
The guys from Detroit? Yeah, he’s pretty good. There’s a job somewhere for him, but how about Zepparella? Yeah, Louisville, look out for Zepparella. I mean, if ever I could see them play again. My goodness, what a frontwoman.

I heard you say something in another interview that you always try to make your songs slightly erotic. You’re really a master of making music slightly erotic, but like a gentleman would.
Well, yeah, I’m a gentleman personified, really. I’ve had my days off, probably again. I’ve seen a lot of summers now, so I have to tell it the way it is, even if it’s kind of a slightly different way to the bare-chested moments. I wouldn’t look quite as cool now, but it’s alright, it’s good. It still works. Everything still works.

You sing with Chrissie Hynde on ‘Bluebird Over the Mountain.’ It’s been great to hear you team up with these duet partners like Alison Krauss and Patty Griffin.
How fantastic was that for me? Alison taught me how to yodel. I mean, she taught me how to get it. It was touch and go many times. It was very funny how many times I’d get it wrong, but in the end I got into it, and I got the groove right. It sounded like something I’d never done before. And then to carry it on with Patty and the Band of Joy — I mean Patty Griffin has the voice of an angel, and she has sometimes a delivery of a wild angel. I’d like to make another record with Patty, maybe, and Alison and I are always talking about Raising Hell, instead of Raising Sand. I’ve got a collection of loads of songs that could be fooled around with, but I’m really into writing stuff, and the guys I play with are superlative. They’re the greatest guys on the planet, and they’re very, very good fun, very silly. It’s kind of like a school trip when we go on tour. It couldn’t be more charming and humorous, so to be able to write with these guys and to come out with the songs, we feel very accomplished. I don’t see it breaking doors down at this particular time in my existence, but for me, it is breaking doors down, because it’s telling me that I can actually move through time and still not repeat myself and not end up like some kind of a one-trick pony, you know?

Robert Plant
Sunday, Sept. 23
Bourbon & Beyond
Champions Park
bourbonandbeyond.com
Oak Stage  |  7:50 p.m.

 

https://www.leoweekly.com/2018/09/robert-plant-talks-led-zeppelin-greta-van-fleet-music-history/

Edited by zeplz71

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/14/2018 at 11:37 AM, andrew r said:

Sorry lousy version and he needs 6 musicians to do what 3 used to do and better.

RP must be in possession of the biggest ego in rock music to want to be that in charge of, what is in effect 

a Zep tribute band . Other than the fact that is the only way to see one quarter of the band we all obsess about i just don't get it

The show I just saw was great, RP was the strength of the band and it was NOT Zep-centric.  Maybe 4-5 tunes Zep did, mostly covers at that.  I wish he'd drop you need love/wll and BD but whatever.  It was great to hear his recent albums performed live, which is clearly his current passion (not a tribute band whatsoever).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you heard Greta Van Fleet? That’s someone with your throat right there.
The guys from Detroit? Yeah, he’s pretty good. There’s a job somewhere for him, but how about Zepparella? Yeah, Louisville, look out for Zepparella. I mean, if ever I could see them play again. My goodness, what a frontwoman.

I saw them last year...Robert has great taste!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/19/2018 at 6:25 PM, zeplz71 said:

Robert Plant talks Led Zeppelin, Greta Van Fleet and music history

Sep 19 2018 |  By Kyle Meredith

When you talk about powerful performers, it’s hard to beat Robert Plant. The former Led Zeppelin frontman returns to Louisville with his band the Sensational Space Shifters as one of the headliners of the Bourbon and Beyond festival. Expect to hear songs from his excellent new LP, Carry Fire, as well as a few classics from his Zeppelin days transformed for his present sound.

LEO: You’re extremely knowledgeable on this history of music, its styles and songs. Does that ever get in the way when you’re writing?
Robert Plant: No, I can’t think about it like that, because there’s no strict idiom at all that we’re coming from as a band. We don’t even think about it. It’s just the personality of the players, and the way we do it is that we’re not coming from any particular specific zone of music or influence. It’s just a kind of mix of everything that we all individually absorb. It’s like being a really cool chef or something, I suppose, or a magician. I’ve talked to people who say, ‘I love that North African rhythm stuff that you do.’ We always think, ‘Oh, that’s just part of what we do anyway, because we’ve been doing it for years and years,’ so it’s just part of the composition of our musical identity, I guess.

Your past is so closely tied with rock and roll. How important is that genre to you in this day?
Rock and roll kind of was Jerry Lee and Little Richard and Larry Williams and Fats Domino. What happened in the late ‘60s, you can’t call Big Brother and the Holding Company or Janis Joplin rock and roll. It was something else, and I think that we followed into the United States following people like Cream and whoever else was around in those days. Herman’s Hermits, perhaps? But whatever it was, we weren’t rock and roll — we were just a band that played some mean stuff, tough, really, really powerful stuff, which was called rock. And then when it got into the hands of the misconstrued, it became hard rock, so is somebody going to tell me that ‘Friends’ or ‘Battle of Evermore’ is hard rock? I don’t think so. I find the whole thing, all of it, right the way through from 1968 to now, it’s just making music.

Have you heard Greta Van Fleet? That’s someone with your throat right there.
The guys from Detroit? Yeah, he’s pretty good. There’s a job somewhere for him, but how about Zepparella? Yeah, Louisville, look out for Zepparella. I mean, if ever I could see them play again. My goodness, what a frontwoman.

I heard you say something in another interview that you always try to make your songs slightly erotic. You’re really a master of making music slightly erotic, but like a gentleman would.
Well, yeah, I’m a gentleman personified, really. I’ve had my days off, probably again. I’ve seen a lot of summers now, so I have to tell it the way it is, even if it’s kind of a slightly different way to the bare-chested moments. I wouldn’t look quite as cool now, but it’s alright, it’s good. It still works. Everything still works.

You sing with Chrissie Hynde on ‘Bluebird Over the Mountain.’ It’s been great to hear you team up with these duet partners like Alison Krauss and Patty Griffin.
How fantastic was that for me? Alison taught me how to yodel. I mean, she taught me how to get it. It was touch and go many times. It was very funny how many times I’d get it wrong, but in the end I got into it, and I got the groove right. It sounded like something I’d never done before. And then to carry it on with Patty and the Band of Joy — I mean Patty Griffin has the voice of an angel, and she has sometimes a delivery of a wild angel. I’d like to make another record with Patty, maybe, and Alison and I are always talking about Raising Hell, instead of Raising Sand. I’ve got a collection of loads of songs that could be fooled around with, but I’m really into writing stuff, and the guys I play with are superlative. They’re the greatest guys on the planet, and they’re very, very good fun, very silly. It’s kind of like a school trip when we go on tour. It couldn’t be more charming and humorous, so to be able to write with these guys and to come out with the songs, we feel very accomplished. I don’t see it breaking doors down at this particular time in my existence, but for me, it is breaking doors down, because it’s telling me that I can actually move through time and still not repeat myself and not end up like some kind of a one-trick pony, you know?

Robert Plant
Sunday, Sept. 23
Bourbon & Beyond
Champions Park
bourbonandbeyond.com
Oak Stage  |  7:50 p.m.

 

https://www.leoweekly.com/2018/09/robert-plant-talks-led-zeppelin-greta-van-fleet-music-history/

Obsessed with the one trick pony and repeating himself, it always comes out like a justification of where he is rather 

than complete satisfaction  that he is no longer in Zeppelin.  Like it or lump it  would anybody pay to see RP today 

if he hadn't been the front man of Led Zeppelin ? He almost seems embarrassed by his legacy .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, andrew r said:

Obsessed with the one trick pony and repeating himself, it always comes out like a justification of where he is rather 

than complete satisfaction  that he is no longer in Zeppelin.  Like it or lump it  would anybody pay to see RP today 

if he hadn't been the front man of Led Zeppelin ? He almost seems embarrassed by his legacy .

pot - kettle... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×