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CARNEGIE HALL, NY 10-17-69 - Never Before Seen Fan Photos! First use of Black Beauty Les Paul

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On 1/26/2018 at 5:00 PM, porgie66 said:

Incredible! Thank you so much for sharing these. This was supposed to be a legendary performance by Bonham of Moby Dick. Any recollection of his playing on the drum solo? He was supposed to have been extraordinary that night .  I thought I read somewhere that Eddie Kramer was at this show. 

Here is "Melody Maker" writer Chris Welch's take on Bonham's Carnegie Hall drum performance:

On Moby Dick at the Carnegie Hall gig:- "When it came to his full-scale workout, Bonham made good on his promise to be in top form. He summoned a demonic drum solo and flew around the kit with a speed and brute strength that was astounding. I saw Bonham play many more solos over the years but never with quite the same sustained attack."

Chris Welch.

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On 1/26/2018 at 5:00 PM, porgie66 said:

Incredible! Thank you so much for sharing these. This was supposed to be a legendary performance by Bonham of Moby Dick. Any recollection of his playing on the drum solo? He was supposed to have been extraordinary that night .  I thought I read somewhere that Eddie Kramer was at this show. 

Yes, according to Lewis and Pallatt's book, Led Zeppelin: The Concert File, Eddie Kramer was there:

image.thumb.png.2b07456aa4fdd4e5554fbc99cd64ed76.png

Edited by drowan

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On 1/26/2018 at 11:44 AM, duckman said:

+1 wonderful.

Amazed though of the modest interior of the legendary Carnegie Hall. When Chris Welch described the show I imagined something like the Albert Hall , or the Concertgebouw Amsterdam. The lack of extra mics also kills any hope for a professional recording of this show :-(

 

Here are some "backstage" impressions of that Carnegie Hall 8:30 pm first set captured by Chris Welch in Lewis and Pallett's book:

image.thumb.png.58d7c12351c423e6959e4109509b2099.png

Edited by drowan

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On 1/26/2018 at 11:44 AM, duckman said:

Here is a link below to the (now closed) "Jewish deli" where Jimmy Page and Robert Plant shared a quick bite with Chris Welch before the second set started at midnight:

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/12/26/506609884/after-8-decades-and-countless-pastrami-sandwiches-new-yorks-carnegie-deli-folds

 

 

Edited by drowan

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Here's some fascinating insight on the Bonham childhood connection at age 15 with Gene Krupa, Benny Goodman and historic Carnegie Hall -  In the book excerpt above, Bonzo recalls his first LP bought at age 15 featuring Benny Goodman and drummer Gene Krupa recorded live at Carnegie Hall in 1938 as he stands on the side of the stage gazing out at the house audience just before the start of the 8:30 pm show on October 17.  Here is the backstory on that Benny Goodman 1938 show and LP vinyl recording that inspired Bonham to put together the performance of his career that night in 1969:

 Benny Goodman was at the absolute height of his legendary career when his publicist first suggested they book Carnegie Hall. He was a star on radio, on stage and on film, and the label “King of Swing” was already attached permanently to his name. So outlandish was the suggestion that a jazz band might play inside the citadel of American high culture, however, that Goodman is said to have laughed the idea off at first. Once he warmed to the notion, however, Goodman threw himself into the task with characteristic passion. In addition to numbers from the regular repertoire of his own band—which included the legendary Harry James on trumpet, Lionel Hampton on vibraphone and Gene Krupa on drums—Goodman planned a program featuring a brand-new “Twenty Years of Jazz” piece and an extended jam session featuring stars of the Duke Ellington and Count Basie orchestras. The concert sold out weeks in advance, with the best seats fetching $2.75.

It would be another decade before anyone who was not in the audience or listening on the radio that night would hear the famed concert. All recordings of the show were presumed lost until Goodman’s sister-in-law came across a set of acetates in 1950. By then, the performance had already become the stuff of legend—particularly the stunning, unplanned piano solo by Jess Stacy on “Sing, Sing, Sing,” the evening’s final number. The album made from the recovered acetates became one of the first 33 1/3 LPs to sell over a million copies. The eventual discovery of the aluminum studio master recordings led to high-quality CD reissues in 1998, 2002 and 2006 of the legendary Carnegie Hall Jazz Concert.

 

Also, here is the link to a great You Tube video featuring the groundbreaking 1938 Carnegie Hall performance and the tremendous buzz it generated:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8aEVY9lONk

After watching this video, you can't help but imagine the impact Bonham's first Benny Goodman album (with renown drummer Gene Krupa) had on his own desire and burning ambitions to become an accomplished drummer.  There are even some impressive Krupa drum solos on this You Tube clip.  This could well have propelled Bonzo to greatness that night at Carnegie Hall in 1969!!  The parallels between the 1938 Benny Goodman Carnegie Hall concert and the Led Zeppelin concert are remarkable!  Now all we need to do is to discover a long lost recording from that incredible night at Carnegie Hall in 1969!!!

 

 

Edited by drowan

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On 1/31/2018 at 1:05 AM, luvlz2 said:

Huge thanks for sharing these photos as so little photos from the Carnegie Hall concert have previously existed! Love it!

Hope you enjoyed them.  And together with the excerpts of commentary and other insight from the performance, we all now have a better opportunity to "re-live"  the amazing energy surrounding that special night!

Edited by drowan

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For the backstory on Chris Welch's review of his first Led Zeppelin concert in the US at Carnegie Hall, see the excerpt of an interview with Welch below:

Q - I wouldn't know. I've never been able to interview Charlie Watts. You went on tour with Led Zeppelin? What year was that? 

A - 1970. The first time I saw them in America was in Carnegie Hall in 1969, October of 1969. 

Q - You got around! Did Melody Maker send you to Carnegie Hall? 

A - Yeah, that's right. I was invited. Peter Grant (Led Zeppelin's manager) invited me over. It was an amazing event. It was terrific. In fact, it was the first 'live' Rock show I saw in the States. I was amazed at the reaction. People screaming, cheering, jumping on the stage. The funny thing was, when I got there, they'd forgotten to get me a ticket. So I had to stand on the stage, which was no hardship. I just stood in the wings and watched the band from there. I remember Chris Wood from Traffic was standing there watching as well. Screaming Lord Sutch was there. The whole stage was full of people, (laughs) watching the band. I went on tour with Led Zeppelin later in Germany in 1970. That was great stuff. Fantastic tour. A whole week. It was Berlin, Cologne and Essen. They were playing to crowds of 7,000 to 8,000 people every night. Maybe even more I think. They were playing like three hour shows. You really got to feel how exhausting it was to be on the road with a band and then partyin' afterwards after each show. 

Edited by drowan

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If an amazing outstanding recording exists from 1938 with Benny Goodman there most certainly exists a recording just like this of Led Zeppelin.

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Here is a fascinating interview with rock music critic, Chris Welch, in which he describes the Carnegie Hall Led Zeppelin concert as one of the most inspiring concerts he had ever witnessed during his 50 year writing career.  (One of Jimi Hendrix's club shows in London was the other high impact experience he cites.)  Chris mentions that he traveled from London to the US with the band on TWA "first class" and about an hour before the concert started, Robert Plant realized that he had left his harmonica in his NYC hotel room (NY Hilton).  Chris was sent in a limo by Robert to fetch it only to return realizing there were no tickets left for this sold out performance.  So, he watched from the side of the stage.  Chris also mentions the influence of Benny Goodman's 1938 Carnegie Hall recording recording (with Gene Krupa) on Bonham's inspiration for playing with such intensity at Carnegie Hall.  The commentary on Carnegie Hall starts in minute 42  of this almost 53 minute Vimeo interview and includes some great insight on the impact of this US concert in shaping his thoughts about how US fans helped propel the band to stardom:

 

Edited by drowan

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1 hour ago, SymphonyX said:

If an amazing outstanding recording exists from 1938 with Benny Goodman there most certainly exists a recording just like this of Led Zeppelin.

Yes, fingers are crossed that one will surface - hopefully sooner than later!  At least for now there are a few more visual images to add to the mix.

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On 1/26/2018 at 11:09 AM, Mook said:

They're absolutely amazing.

My life would be complete if a recording of this was to ever come out.

Agreed!  But while you're waiting, take a look at this January 9, 1970 Albert Hall recording of LZ playing "Bring it on Home" and featuring Robert's harmonica playing and Jimmy Page playing his Black Beauty Les Paul guitar:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uX5yhpO52AA

This captures some of the energy and spirit of the Carnegie Hall concert with the fans rocking on with the band at the edge of the stage!  You also get a sense of why Robert simply had to have Chris Welch fetch his harmonica he had left behind at his hotel room before the Carnegie Hall show started!!  This was also captured just a few months before Jimmy Page's cherished Black Beauty guitar was stolen at a US airport!!

Edited by drowan

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It is hard to believe that almost 50 years after that 1969 Carnegie Hall triumph, Robert Plant is still hard at work taking his music on the road to the US.  Robert played at the Orpheum Theater in Boston last night (Feb 16, 2018) to a sell out crowd.  Here is a recent video of him playing one of his new releases, "Carry Fire".  Rock on Robert!  You still inspire us:

 

Edited by drowan

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On 1/26/2018 at 11:26 PM, lif said:

Let me add to the thanks for sharing these photos.  Wonderful piece of LZ history.

And thanks to all of you for your appreciative and insightful comments.  Zep fans are the best!  Keep your comments coming.

Edited by drowan

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22 hours ago, drowan said:

Agreed!  But while you're waiting, take a look at this January 9, 1970 Albert Hall recording of LZ playing "Bring it on Home" and featuring Robert's harmonica playing and Jimmy Page playing his Black Beauty Les Paul guitar:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uX5yhpO52AA

This captures some of the energy and spirit of the Carnegie Hall concert with the fans rocking on with the band at the edge of the stage!  You also get a sense of why Robert simply had to have Chris Welch fetch his harmonica he had left behind at his hotel room before the Carnegie Hall show started!!  This was also captured just a few months before Jimmy Page's cherished Black Beauty guitar was stolen at a US airport!!

Robert Plant played the Orpheum in Boston Friday night (2/16/18) and capped the evening with a another high energy rendition of "Bring in on Home": 

http://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/music/2018/02/17/wide-ranging-explorations-and-rock-explosions-from-robert-plant/odTbBaFAAcabCJoM10ayrO/story.html

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On ‎1‎/‎26‎/‎2018 at 5:14 PM, drowan said:

Yes, the Bonham drum solo went on forever and was incredible.  He got a standing ovation from the crowd, which was not hard given that many of the fans stood through a lot of the show anyway.  I remember that at the climax of the drum solo he was going through a constant cycle from left to right and back again from the snare drum to successive tom-tom's.  As you may have noticed in the photos (and particularly in the close-up of him alone), Bonham stripped down to the waist through much of the concert as the physical exertion in most of the songs by him was riveting and tremendous.

Holy shit, can't believe I'm just now stumbling upon this.

Almost brings a tear to my eye that there's no recording of this....

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On 1/26/2018 at 11:26 PM, lif said:

Let me add to the thanks for sharing these photos.  Wonderful piece of LZ history.

And thanks to all of you for your appreciative and insightful comments.  Zep fans are the best.  Keep your comments coming!

For those Zep fans who'd like to review a readable copy of the Chris Welch October 25, 1969 review of that October 17 Carnegie Hall performance in Melody Maker, LZ Webmaster, Sam Rapallo, has kindly provided a higher resolution image.  See the link below:

http://www.ledzeppelin.com/sites/g/files/g2000006376/f/201802/1969-10-25--Carnegie-Hall-review---c-welch---mmaker.jpg

 

Thank you Sam!  Enjoy.  Also it is definitely worth watching the Chris Welch video interview of his impressions from that night featured in the earlier comments above!

Edited by drowan

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Wow what a thread:):) Great pics!! I love when you can just walk up to front row at shows but Led Zeppelin at C. H. before LZII. . just wow!! THX for sharing!:)

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On 1/26/2018 at 10:11 AM, SteveAJones said:

Thanks a million!

Steve:  As a personal thanks for your appreciation, here is an unpublished photo that was not posted to the LZ Forums website.  I believe this also shows Jimmy playing his Black Beauty Les Paul guitar at the 1969 Carnegie Hall concert.  Regards, DRowan

image.thumb.png.d4a2436bed7e8704ea21f7ad91dd9ec6.png

Edited by drowan

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Wow still cannot get over how close you were to the band. Those photographs are very much appreciated.

Edited by anniemouse

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19 hours ago, anniemouse said:

Wow still cannot get over how close you were to the band. Those photographs are very much appreciated.

Yes, very close and a fortunate night to have a camera!  That evening was electric.  The band quickly threw it into high gear and never looked back.  Though people were dancing in the isles, it was easy to work your way to the stage for a couple of tight images.  And you could tell the band was amped over the energy and roar of the crowd!  They had us all on the opening chords. 

Edited by drowan

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On 2/19/2018 at 3:16 PM, Bozoso73 said:

Wow what a thread:):) Great pics!! I love when you can just walk up to front row at shows but Led Zeppelin at C. H. before LZII. . just wow!! THX for sharing!:)

Thanks very much.  In addition to posting the recently discovered pictures, I'm trying to weave a little of the history surrounding this concert to provide some additional insight on the mindset of the band going into the Carnegie Hall performance.  New York was Led Zeppelin's first stop on this Fall 1969 Tour and a group of fans gathered at London Heathrow Airport to see them off.  Rock critic, Chris Welch, who accompanied LZ on their flight, noted that one fan gave Robert Plant a copy of Paul Oliver's then just-published book, The Story of the Blues, which he read extensively while on the plane.  Paul Oliver went on to become a noted historian of the Blues and recently passed away seven months ago at age 90.  He was age 52 in 1969 when the book was published and LZ played at Carnegie Hall.  A link to his New York Times obituary is below:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/17/arts/music/paul-oliver-authority-on-the-blues-dies-at-90.html

For a reference of the book that Robert Plant read extensively from during his trans-Atlantic flight just prior to the Carnegie Hall Concert see the link below:

https://blues.org/blues_hof_inductee/the-story-of-the-blues-by-paul-oliver/

For those LZ fans who continue to be fascinated with the relationship of the Blues to rock music, please note that the Blues Hall of Fame is in Memphis (TN):

https://blues.org/hall-of-fame-museum/#about

 

 

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On 2/17/2018 at 2:23 AM, drowan said:

Here's some fascinating insight on the Bonham childhood connection at age 15 with Gene Krupa, Benny Goodman and historic Carnegie Hall -  In the book excerpt above, Bonzo recalls his first LP bought at age 15 featuring Benny Goodman and drummer Gene Krupa recorded live at Carnegie Hall in 1938 as he stands on the side of the stage gazing out at the house audience just before the start of the 8:30 pm show on October 17.  Here is the backstory on that Benny Goodman 1938 show and LP vinyl recording that inspired Bonham to put together the performance of his career that night in 1969:

 Benny Goodman was at the absolute height of his legendary career when his publicist first suggested they book Carnegie Hall. He was a star on radio, on stage and on film, and the label “King of Swing” was already attached permanently to his name. So outlandish was the suggestion that a jazz band might play inside the citadel of American high culture, however, that Goodman is said to have laughed the idea off at first. Once he warmed to the notion, however, Goodman threw himself into the task with characteristic passion. In addition to numbers from the regular repertoire of his own band—which included the legendary Harry James on trumpet, Lionel Hampton on vibraphone and Gene Krupa on drums—Goodman planned a program featuring a brand-new “Twenty Years of Jazz” piece and an extended jam session featuring stars of the Duke Ellington and Count Basie orchestras. The concert sold out weeks in advance, with the best seats fetching $2.75.

It would be another decade before anyone who was not in the audience or listening on the radio that night would hear the famed concert. All recordings of the show were presumed lost until Goodman’s sister-in-law came across a set of acetates in 1950. By then, the performance had already become the stuff of legend—particularly the stunning, unplanned piano solo by Jess Stacy on “Sing, Sing, Sing,” the evening’s final number. The album made from the recovered acetates became one of the first 33 1/3 LPs to sell over a million copies. The eventual discovery of the aluminum studio master recordings led to high-quality CD reissues in 1998, 2002 and 2006 of the legendary Carnegie Hall Jazz Concert.

 

Also, here is the link to a great You Tube video featuring the groundbreaking 1938 Carnegie Hall performance and the tremendous buzz it generated:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8aEVY9lONk

After watching this video, you can't help but imagine the impact Bonham's first Benny Goodman album (with renown drummer Gene Krupa) had on his own desire and burning ambitions to become an accomplished drummer.  There are even some impressive Krupa drum solos on this You Tube clip.  This could well have propelled Bonzo to greatness that night at Carnegie Hall in 1969!!  The parallels between the 1938 Benny Goodman Carnegie Hall concert and the Led Zeppelin concert are remarkable!  Now all we need to do is to discover a long lost recording from that incredible night at Carnegie Hall in 1969!!!

 

 

Here is the cover of the first vinyl LP album that John Bonham bought when he was 15 years old.  He mentioned this Benny Goodman album (featuring drummer Gene Krupa) nostalgically to Chris Welch and others assembled on the Carnegie Hall stage while he set up his drums before the concert:

 d416f57198c0be1ad795b8536b89506f.jpg?fc221989

The Famous 1938 Carnegie Hall Jazz Concert by Benny Goodman, Columbia Records catalogue item SL-160, is a two-disc LP of swing and jazzmusic, first issued in 1950. The concert has been described as "the single most important jazz or popular music concert in history: jazz's "coming out" party to the world of "respectable" music."[2]

The first ever double album, it was one of the first records of Benny Goodman music issued on the new long-playing format, and one of the first to sell over a million copies. A landmark recording, it was the premiere performance given by a jazz orchestra in the famed Carnegie Hall in New York City. This album was also sold in a set of nine 45 rpm records in the same year by Columbia.

The reception to the original 1950 long-playing double-album was exceptional, as had been the band's appearance at Carnegie Hall. Over time as technology improved the material was re-released, with digital versions produced both in the 1980s and 1990s.

Edited by drowan

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This photo below, taken at K.B. Hallen in Copenhagen on February 28, 1970 (four and a half months after the Carnegie Hall concert) shows Led Zeppelin playing with a stage set-up quite similar to that in New York:

0002871_led_zeppelin.jpeg

K.B. Hallen seats approximately 3,000 which is very close in scale to Carnegie Hall.

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On 1/28/2018 at 4:38 PM, ohjimmy said:

And this is why I love this site.....seeing treasures like these! Love these pics.....thxs for sharing them Sam !

 

cheers

Yes, and we also need to thank Peter Grant (posthumously).  Were it not for his persuasive style and ability to motivate the band to agree to another major tour during the fall of 1969, it is doubtful LZ would have made it to Carnegie Hall.  The clincher was Grant's angle - that they would be the first rock band to play in Carnegie Hall since the Rolling Stones played there five years earlier in 1964.   So here's to Peter Grant:

7400eaa3928940986e0c682c8ce970f6.jpeg

Peter James "G" Grant (5 April 1935 – 21 November 1995) was an Englishmusic manager. Grant managed the popular English bands the Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin and Bad Company, among others, and was also a record executivefor Swan Song Records. Grant has been described as "one of the shrewdest and most ruthless managers in rock history".[1]He is widely credited with improving pay and conditions for musicians in dealings with concert promoters.[2]

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