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gibsonfan159

The First Shredder

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I'm going with John McLaughlin and the Mahavishnu Orchestra. The stuff he did on The Inner Mounting Flame and Birds Of Fire are pretty remarkable.

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Playing fast in the 64th and 32nd note range goes back to at least the early classical period when violins were particularly popular.

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1 hour ago, Zepfan2001 said:

Playing fast in the 64th and 32nd note range goes back to at least the early classical period when violins were particularly popular.

I believe Gibson was referring to the contemporary period, non-classical. However you are correct and one could argue the first, true shredder was Paganini. Though I am sure there were a few seriously bad ass Lute shredders back in the 15th century no-one will ever know about...lost to time.

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The first, as far as I know, was Jimmy Page on Heartbreaker. This would be the first instance of shredding, not the first shredder, per se...then again, what he was doing live in '68 and '69 very often sounds like shredding to me... D&C solos, CB solos, HB solos.

The best, as far as I've heard, is Shawn Lane. He's the fastest guitarist who's ever lived, and the musicality he interweaves throughout his shredding is second-to-none.

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Posted (edited)

 "Shredding" is a relatively recent term "late 80s/early 90s ?", the first guitar player  to be a so called shredder would be iirc Yngie Malsteem (however his name is spelt). Tuneless noise if you ask me, just a horrible style, nothing clever about it at all..

Edited by JTM

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How would you define shredding... virtuoso or rehearsed pieces? A lengthy solo with double tapping?

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Let me be a little more specific; Involving an electric guitar with noticeable overdrive/distortion, who do you think was the first to play something that fit the mold of "shred guitar" before it was actually coined as a term? As in not just something blues-scale oriented, but more modal. Were there any jazz guitarists to fit that description?

The Communication Breakdown solo is certainly a contender although it's mostly just a pentatonic run.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, gibsonfan159 said:

Let me be a little more specific; Involving an electric guitar with noticeable overdrive/distortion, who do you think was the first to play something that fit the mold of "shred guitar" before it was actually coined as a term? As in not just something blues-scale oriented, but more modal. Were there any jazz guitarists to fit that description?

The Communication Breakdown solo is certainly a contender although it's mostly just a pentatonic run.

I would have to go with, under that criteria, either Uli Jon Roth or Michael Schankar as they were both doing what you describe by 73'. To narrow it down between the two I would say Schankar as the first, however Roth experimented with more modes especially by 75'. 

Personally, I believe these two guitarists are not only the first shredders in contemporary rock, but, responsible for the whole subgenere of the virtuoso, shred guitarists such as EVH, Randy Rhodes, Malmsteen, etc. Unfortunately, the ability to be a shredder and still emote well and project emotion is all but impossible and was completely lost on this group by the 80's when speed and sweep picking were all that was important. Both Roth and Schankar were able to shred and emote well and as such I put both miles ahead of those who would come later including EVH & Rhodes as both of their playing never really moved me, even though I respect their talents.

Edited by IpMan

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I always thought that the term "shredding" was about loud fast guitar soloing, not merely loud distortion. Now I know and knowing is half the battle.

 

gi-joe-a-real-american-hero-season-20-20100422053644015-000.jpg

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2 hours ago, IpMan said:

 Unfortunately, the ability to be a shredder and still emote well and project emotion is all but impossible and was completely lost on this group by the 80's when speed and sweep picking were all that was important. 

I don't agree with this. Most people don't understand that there is more than one emotion. They say that if you aren't whining and crying then there is no emotion. Some emotions are incredibly high and a lot of virtuosos express those feelings through 1000 notes per minute. Personally, I don't care for overly emotive music. I like dynamic music with lots of depth, skill and great arrangements but usually, I wouldn't give a hyperdramatic musician much of a listen and would quickly change what I am hearing.

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14 minutes ago, Zepfan2001 said:

I always thought that the term "shredding" was about loud fast guitar soloing, not merely loud distortion. Now I know and knowing is half the battle.

 

gi-joe-a-real-american-hero-season-20-20100422053644015-000.jpg

If you didn't include an overdriven tone then some of the old jazz guitarists like Django would qualify. But I think you have to include it.

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