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moffo

Who is Eddie?

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Who is Eddie who Robert refers to in a few of the songs?

Probably Eddie Kramer, their audio engineer?

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The title "Listen To This Eddie" is allegedly a reference to Eddie Van Halen of the band Van Halen, who in interviews criticised the playing ability of Led Zeppelin guitarist, Jimmy Page. However, according to a Shockwaves Magazine article by Pat O'Connor entitled "The Ten Greatest Bootlegs", "Eddie" in the bootleg title refers to audio engineer Eddie Kramer, and not to Eddie Van Halen, implying that even Kramer would be impressed by such a quality bootleg recording. Others say that Led Zeppelin wanted to record a live album during the 1977 tour but Kramer refused to record any because of Page's sloppy playing, and that's why the bootleg got that title.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Listen_to_This_Eddie

Edited by eternal light

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I'm of the opinion Plant's stage comments and the title refer to Eddie Kramer, not Eddie

Van Halen. EVH was a young gun on the L.A. rock scene, and he did make a few boasts

on his way up, but he also attended one of their L.A. shows in '72 and was blown away

and approached John Bonham in a club on the Sunset Strip circa '74 to compliment him.

Mike Millard's L.A. '77 audience recordings are among the finest Led Zeppelin bootlegs ever recorded and a blatant comparison to Eddie Kramer's work seems obvious to me.

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I'm of the opinion Plant's stage comments and the title refer to Eddie Kramer, not Eddie

Van Halen. EVH was a young gun on the L.A. rock scene, and he did make a few boasts

on his way up, but he also attended one of their L.A. shows in '72 and was blown away

and approached John Bonham in a club on the Sunset Strip circa '74 to compliment him.

Mike Millard's L.A. '77 audience recordings are among the finest Led Zeppelin bootlegs ever recorded and a blatant comparison to Eddie Kramer's work seems obvious to me.

I must agree with the other Steve here. ;)

No doubt that Kramer missed a golden opportunity during the LA 1977 shows. Particularly the 21st and 23rd. No Zep show bettered these in my opinion...

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I must agree with the other Steve here. ;)

No doubt that Kramer missed a golden opportunity during the LA 1977 shows. Particularly the 21st and 23rd. No Zep show bettered these in my opinion...

Glad I went.

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Mike Millard's L.A. '77 audience recordings are among the finest Led Zeppelin bootlegs ever recorded and a blatant comparison to Eddie Kramer's work seems obvious to me.

You almost would never know these were audience recordings. Much better than a soundboard as these capture the true atmosphere of the show as well. I don't think it's possible to make better quality auds than these.

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You almost would never know these were audience recordings. Much better than a soundboard as these capture the true atmosphere of the show as well. I don't think it's possible to make better quality auds than these.

The current disposition of Millard's master tapes does remain a bonafide mystery to me. While it is known his Mother insisted his bedroom remain undisturbed for quite some time after his death, close friends of his said Mike deliberately destroyed some if not all of his original master tapes before killing himself.

Edited by SteveAJones

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The current disposition of Millard's master tapes does remain a bonafide mystery to me. While it is known his Mother insisted his bedroom remain undisturbed for quite some time after his death, close friends of his said Mike deliberately destroyed some if not all of his original master tapes before killing himself.

Wow. How bizarre!

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You almost would never know these were audience recordings. Much better than a soundboard as these capture the true atmosphere of the show as well. I don't think it's possible to make better quality auds than these.

I agree, I prefer the Millard tapes from '75 and '77 over most SBDs because you have the sound quality of the SBDs with the atmosphere of the audience, but with little or no audience noise disrupting the music...however Mike did it, he was a genius!

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The current disposition of Millard's master tapes does remain a bonafide mystery to me. While it is known his Mother insisted his bedroom remain undisturbed for quite some time after his death, close friends of his said Mike deliberately destroyed some if not all of his original master tapes before killing himself.

Yeah supposedly in his depression in his final days he destroyed most of his masters, including all of the LZ ones...I wonder if the low gen Millard sources are 2nd gens from people he traded with...

He also used to "mark" every tape he'd send out with dropouts of volume fluctuations and record it in a notebook (along with who he sent it to) so he could determine when they inevitably became bootlegged which people they went through to get to the bootleggers...

An interesting story behind this guy, for sure...

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I'm of the opinion Plant's stage comments and the title refer to Eddie Kramer, not Eddie

Van Halen. EVH was a young gun on the L.A. rock scene, and he did make a few boasts

on his way up, but he also attended one of their L.A. shows in '72 and was blown away

and approached John Bonham in a club on the Sunset Strip circa '74 to compliment him.

Mike Millard's L.A. '77 audience recordings are among the finest Led Zeppelin bootlegs ever recorded and a blatant comparison to Eddie Kramer's work seems obvious to me.

One of the main reasons why it was cvalled Listen to this Eddie was because their engineer, Eddie Kramer thought they were too sloppy in 1977 to record another live album. But after listening to it, it proves him wrong in my opinion.

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One of the main reasons why it was cvalled Listen to this Eddie was because their engineer, Eddie Kramer thought they were too sloppy in 1977 to record another live album. But after listening to it, it proves him wrong in my opinion.

Holy redundancy, Batman! (see eternal light's post, #4, above)... B)

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:lol: :lol:

From what I've heard, Millard had a friend who also bootlegged concerts named Eddie. Millard mailed him a cassette of this amazing recording and in a boasting manner wrote on the cassette "Listen to This Eddie".

I don't know this is a fact, but it makes a hell of a lot more sense than it having anything to do with Eddie Kramer or Eddie Van Halen, thats for damn sure.

Edited by snapper

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As an aside, during Robert's performance of Black Dog with Strange Sensation, he used to say "Listen to this Eddie" as well. Though the name changed depending on the country he was in :D

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From what I've heard, Millard had a friend who also bootlegged concerts named Eddie. Millard mailed him a cassette of this amazing recording and in a boasting manner wrote on the cassette "Listen to This Eddie".

I don't know this is a fact, but it makes a hell of a lot more sense than it having anything to do with Eddie Kramer or Eddie Van Halen, thats for damn sure.

It's remotely possible, I suppose, but Robert specifically mentions an "Eddie" on the tape. Anyway, the thing about Millard's recordings is there are so many worthy of boasting about. Many of his Rolling Stones concerts are held in equally high esteem.

Edited by SteveAJones

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It's remotely possible, I suppose, but Robert specifically mentions an "Eddie" on the tape. Anyway, the thing about Millard's recordings is there are so many worthy of boasting about. Many of his Rolling Stones concerts are held in equally high esteem.

I have a few of those myself from the 1975 tour. They're fantastic.

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It's remotely possible, I suppose, but Robert specifically mentions an "Eddie" on the tape. Anyway, the thing about Millard's recordings is there are so many worthy of boasting about. Many of his Rolling Stones concerts are held in equally high esteem.

there's also a really excellent Pink Floyd 75 show he did

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