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PhxHorn

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About PhxHorn

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    Zep Head

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  • Location
    Phoenix, AZ
  1. I believe that tune is actually called 'No Place to Go'. Robert introduced it by that title on Sunday night. https://youtu.be/0pF8Og7Jsro
  2. Does anyone have decent video footage of either the Phoenix or the Tucson show that Robert played in July 2010? If so, please send me a private message. Thanks!
  3. I saw Plant in Indianapolis in June of '88, my first concert, actually. Mission UK was the opener and they didn't get booed, but the audience basically ignored them. Then I had tickets to see him in Chicago on Oct 11, 1988, but that one also got pushed to December 15, 1988 due to the shower incident. Joan Jett was the opener in Chicago, and she went over well.
  4. I noticed that after I'd posted the video, but maybe he decided to film it with a different guitar for some reason. At any rate, I figgered y'all would like the tune.
  5. http://www.amazon.com/Robert-Plant-Strange-Sensation-Soundstage/dp/B000IFRR9Y Before you start worrying about bootlegs, make sure you have the official stuff!
  6. The concert tonight was postponed *again*, but Mike Campbell had some interesting comments in today's paper: Question: You guys would appear to be playing up the blues side of your sound more on this album. What inspired that? Answer: A lot of it was this guitar I got, this 1959 Les Paul Sunburst that I'd always wanted. Tom was looking at it and he said, "We should do a record around the sound of this guitar." So we wrote songs with that guitar in mind. And that guitar kind of leads you into that type of bluesy sound. Q: Was one of those inspirations you hadn't explored before Led Zeppelin? "I Should Have Known It" has a very prominent Led Zeppelin vibe. A: I'll take that as a compliment 'cause I love Led Zeppelin. That guitar is the same vintage guitar that Jimmy Page used a lot, and Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck. It's interesting, that guitar, when you play it, it leads you into those types of riffs for some reason. The sound it makes wants to play that sort of thing. That particular song was definitely inspired by just picking up that guitar and following what it wanted to do. I just noticed today that I get a free download of the album with my concert ticket, and I'll say this: It doesn't really thrill me, too much slow blues, but there are some decent songs on it. The tune mentioned above does sound very much like a Zeppelin tune, and would be of interest to Zeppelin fans. Judge for yourselves:
  7. I was watching the black comedy series 'Dead Like Me', which involves people (who are dead but look living) who takes the souls of those who are about to die. They have to do it before the actual death occurs so as to spare the soul the trauma of dying, and so much of the show involves figuring out who the target is and finding them without much info to go on. One girl is assigned to 'reap' the soul of a rock star, but it's difficult getting close to him due to the security. It all happens during a concert taping, and the tune he's singing is 'In My Time of Dying.' The episode is 'Rites of Passage', from the second season. It's a quirky entertaining show.
  8. I'd love to wake up next to a naked Nicole Kidman, but I'm not holding my breath.
  9. Jesus gonna make it my dyin' day.
  10. I feel bad for you guys who can't watch the video. The best part is when he pulls out some old reel-to-reel tapes and plays a couple of unreleased Zeppelin tunes.
  11. Just thought I'd be the first to point out that in 'In the Mood' Robert and Patty sing a verse of Fairport Convention's '(Come All Ye) Rolling Minstrels'. Not that I recognize the song, but I was able to type enough of it into the Googles to get a hit.
  12. The one I'm talking about is A Conversation with Robert Plant, interviewed by Nigel Williamson. 44 minutes. At the very end, he sounds like he's flipping through a stack of records and listing off the names, but they're hard to hear and those english people talk funny.
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