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walter's walker

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About walter's walker

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday September 11

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    13th Floor Elevator, Enron Hubbard Bldg. Houston Texxas
  • Interests
    Aleister Crowley, Kenneth Grant, Gerald Gardner, Alex Saunders, George Pickingill, Sir Francis Dashwood, Rabelais, The Hell-Fire Club, the O.T.O., the A.'.A.'., more...
  1. walter's walker

    Jimmy Page slandered for occultism in Daily Mail

    Crowley didn't create Thelema, he wasn't even the first Englishman to use it, that honor goes to Sir Francis Dashwood, founder of the Monks of Medmenham and the Order of St. Francis of Wycombe, better known today as "The Hell-Fire Club." America's Benjamin Franklin was a member, or at least an Honored Guest there in 1760 or so. Thelema comes from the 17th Century comedy "Gargantua and Pantagruel." Sir Francis' mausoleum is six-sided, and of shape and dimension described in the first book where Rabelais writes of the Abbey of Thélème, built by the giant Gargantua. Their motto, inscribed in stone over the entry was "Fais ce que voudras..." or in English "Do what thou wilt." (which was written on the inner band of 1st editions of "Led Zeppelin III")
  2. walter's walker

    Jimmy Page slandered for occultism in Daily Mail

    Yes, that's the Lamen of the O.T.O. he's wearing in the picture. The other sigil you have up there is a modified symbol of Crowley's Magickal Order, the A.'.A.'. (whose name is *supposed* to be Argentum Astrum [silver Star] but may in fact stand for something else). Crowley founded the A.'.A.'. around 1909, if I recall correctly. Crowley did not found the O.T.O; he assumed its leadership in the 1920's, the Lamen predates this. The Lamen is a pretty common object, you can go over to Ebay and find Lamen pendants, rings, hats, T-shirts being sold by a number of individuals.
  3. walter's walker

    Jimmy Page slandered for occultism in Daily Mail

    Well, at the time he sold Boleskine, (this was over 20 years ago, mind you) I was given to understand that it had to do with liquidation of material assets considered "common property" in a Divorce Court. There was a lot of talk among Thelemites, but nobody actually stepped up with the 200,000 British Pounds he was asking for it back in 1990, and it was bought by ordinary people who turned it into a Bed & Breakfast.
  4. walter's walker

    Jimmy Page slandered for occultism in Daily Mail

    No he's not, he wasn't, he never has been an Initiate of any branch or linage of the O.T.O. Mr. Page is a personal friend of the Caliph, (the Head of the O.T.O.) Hymenaus Beta, who is a personal friend of mine. Mr. Page has several American friends in the Order, people that he's known for decades, but Jimmy's never been much of a "joiner." Likely he didn't want to associate himself with the strife between different groups claiming to be O.T.O. back in the 70's and 80's, certainly didn't want to be percieved as taking anyone's side.
  5. walter's walker

    Led Zeppelin Live in Japan '69 album

    "Authentic" in that it is a Led Zeppelin bootleg? Yes, it's a vintage vinyl Led Zeppelin bootleg. The market generally bears $15-25 per record, depending on condition, unless you have something rare, like original Rubber Dubber pressings.
  6. walter's walker

    New Audience Tape

    Agreed. I bought a couple of Highland Pink Floyd CDs over a decade ago, and "treed" them to members of the Laughing Madcaps, and they're still being bit-torrented! I love that! 8 or 9 years ago I got the Beatles Anthology Director's Cut DVD within days of its release to the hands of the fellow willing to tree all 8 discs & all the artwork to the Beatlegs group, it's still in circulation! Besides, I like having silver discs; the CDs I traded 10-15 years ago are starting to go bad; the factory-pressed bootlegs I've purchased have not..
  7. walter's walker

    The Good and not so Good of Celebration Day

    Ilve been living with this since its day of release. I've listened and watched several time. Well, the Rehearsal Tapes that were bootlegged back 2-3 years ago were a better rehearsal performance than the fixed-camera video rehearsal performance included in this set. BUT it's new, and it's good. I didn't care for the whiplash editing, three to four seconds at most per shot... I'll leave it to the experts with the sound spectrum analyzers to tell us what we're hearing... As others have noted, if this is the last flight of the mighty Zeppelin, it's a helluva high-water mark to end your legacy.
  8. walter's walker

    Stairway to Hell?

    Well, as I recall, you could put a half-twist on the belt of some old belt-driven turntables and they'd play backwards, or if you had a good direct-drive turntable with a variable speed feature, you could carefully spin the record backwards yourself and watch the side of the turntable to make sure you stayed at 33 1/3. Or you could just record it to a reel-to-reel, turn the tape around, rewind it and then the recording plays backwards over the tape heads. The New Riders of the Purple Sage played around with backwards taping for psychedelic purposes back in '71, so did that band, Klaatu, in '72 or so-- I think the song was called "Little Neutrino", the lyrics were printed backwards on the album sleeve because the song was recorded backwards on the record. Of course the Beatles started all of this back in '65 (I think) with "Rain", and Jimi Hendrix hid a 78 r,p.m. message on "Nine to the Universe" (but it wasn't backwards). Looking through the book "The Great Beatles Death Clues" one is constantly mind-boggled at the amount of bleary-eyed acid-burnout time people must have spent finding all of these "clues", some of which, of course, include parts where one hears "John is dead man, miss him, miss him" and of course Revolution No. 9's plethora of spliced and backwards clues.
  9. *I* wish he'd release the complete "Friends" and "Four Sticks" sessions from the 1972 Bombay Orchestra sessions. A couple outtakes of "Swan Song" would be nice too. Were there ever any lyrics written to "Swan Song?"
  10. walter's walker

    No newly circulated live shows in 2011

    What you call a 'hoarder' others call a "rarities collector." If you had the smarts and the equipment to record "your" tape at a Zeppelin show back in say, '73, and you got a recording of a show that nobody else has, it would be hard to think of it as anything other than "yours." You bought the equipment. You bought the ticket. You bought the tapes. You smuggled them all in, and you recorded the show you attended. I can see where someone who did all that feels they have some sort of proprietal connection. I remember 25+ years ago trading with tapers who had "No Trade" lists; rare dates that they'd only trade for other rare dates-- stuff that at the time was only going around in pretty rarified circles of former Fillmore West and Avalon Ballroom sound techs and their immediate friends. The reason they were so tight with their tapes was so that they *wouldn't* be bootlegged. He was playing me shows we know today like "Dancing Avacado" and "1969 Whiskey A Go-Go" that very few people had heard back in 1984. He an one other of Bill Graham's employees has told me that Mr. Graham made sure there were tapes running for any shows he promoted, so who knows what's still in the vaults? Or who has the tapes?
  11. Ah, but at the time (in the mid-70's) there was a lot less distinction between Disco and Funk, sure lines were drawn in the sand between Parliment and Funkadelic, but where you draw a line for the Bowie/Lennon collaboration of "Fame?" Of course it all turned to cocaine-dusted shit by the time Studio 54 got hot. Perhaps it's that Funk kept the R&B swing, where Disco had much more of a techno-gloss. You got to remember too that "Funk" has been a term attached to "down & dirty music" (per Jelly Roll Morton) for well over 110 years. One of the most notorious of the New Orleans Storeyville dance venues in the early 20th century was called "Funky Butt Hall." So you're right-- The Crunge is definitely R&B Funk.
  12. walter's walker

    LUCIFER RISING

    We are not talking about *this* stage in the game. We are talking about the stage of the game 40 years ago where Jimmy was becoming very influenced by the music of the indigenous peoples of North Africa, the Middle East, and the Indian sub-continent. You (and most others people here) have probably heard the attempts he did with the orchestra of native musicians in Bombay in 1973 (if memory serves) to record a couple of numbers like "Friends." It seems to have been one of the most creative periods of his career, and "Lucifer Rising" gives us (or some of us, at least) more insight to his artistic vision during that period. Someone suggested that Led Zeppelin invented "World Music"... no, for the record, this sort of "World Music" as it is now called, it could be argued was almost single-handedly brought back to public attention by the Beats and hippies: Brion Gyson who hired the Master Musicians of Jajouka to play in his Morroccan resteraunt for several years 1954-1958, and a decade later, he took Rolling Stone Brian Jones to their village,, who made (amazing) field recordings of the Master Musicians of Jojouka, the former Royal Musicians to the King of Morrocco for over 1000 years. Mick Jagger caused these recordings to be released posthumously as the LP "Brian Jones Presents The Master Musicians Of JoJouka" in 1969; I'm sure Jimmy was familiar with it. Avant-Gard Dancer/Poet/Film Maker Maya Dern did some similarly amazing field recordings of tunes and songs of the Vodou Societies around the same time, what their drum beats were, their ritual dances, etc. (See her film "Divine Horsemen" if you can find it, otherwise read the book.) An LP of these recordings was released in 1954 on Elecktra Label and sells for $50-150 depending on condition, IF you can locate a copy for sale. (Don't trust Amazon 2nd-market sellers when purchasing used LPs). Again, given Jimmy's *ahem* esoteric interests, I'd be quite suprised if he was unaware of the record or film (I know he knows the film's former distributor personally).
  13. walter's walker

    LUCIFER RISING

    Having coughed up twice for it (once on LP, once on CD) I'm rather choked to pick it up a third time, but I Will. I do have a direct-drive linear-tracking turntable, so I'll buy it when I see it at my local specialty shop, like I like for the Beach Boys "SMiLE." But I appreciate the Green Demon's sharers for giving me the opportunity to verify that it was what it was supposed to be. "Lucifer Rising" strikes me the way that the LP "Brian Jones Presents The Master Musicians of Jojouka" strikes me-- like the music of the Night of Pan-- literally 'Pan-ic." It is not cacophony, like (say) Lou Reed's "Metal Machine Music", it is more an aural sculpture, like the Beatles "Revolution No. 9", your reaction tells more about you than it does about the quality of the music. "No longer relevant material?" Mr. Page was at the very *height* of his creativity at the time that these pieces were written. If he releases an entire 3-LP set of outtakes of the never-recorded "Swan Song" (from the same period) I'll buy that too, and be able to hear the genius in it just as surely as I can here it here. Some of the faithful fans have been waiting almost 40 years to hear this. I'll listen to it again, and again, when I play it for my Zep-head friends so they can hear the upgrade to the sound, which is admirable. If you don't like it, I guess you just can't dig where Jimmy's head was at at the time-- lots of Moroccan and North Indian influences, which were still in his head 20 years later for "Unledded". But "Lucifer Rising" definitely counts among the more Avant-Guard pieces to come from a musician of Page's stature (Lennon's "Life With The Lions" would be another). It's not going to please everyone, but there's never a guarantee that you'll like every single thing your favorite artist ever puts out.
  14. walter's walker

    LUCIFER RISING

    Having coughed up twice for it (once on LP, once on CD) I'm rather choked to pick it up a third time, but I Will. I do have a direct-drive linear-tracking turntable, so I'll buy it when I see it at my local specialty shop, like I like for the Beach Boys "SMiLE." But I appreciate the Green Demon's sharers for giving me the opportunity to verify that it was what it was supposed to be. "Lucifer Rising" strikes me the way that the LP "Brian Jones Presents The Master Musicians of Jojouka" strikes me-- like the music of the Night of Pan-- literally 'Pan-ic." It is not cacophony, like (say) Lou Reed's "Metal Machine Music", it is more an aural sculpture, like the Beatles "Revolution No. 9", your reaction tells more about you than it does about the quality of the music. "No longer relevant material?" Mr. Page was at the very *height* of his creativity at the time that these pieces were written. If he releases an entire 3-LP set of outtakes of the never-recorded "Swan Song" (from the same period) I'll buy that too, and be able to hear the genius in it just as surely as I can hear it here. Some of the faithful fans have been waiting almost 40 years to hear this. I'll listen to it again, and again, when I play it for my Zep-head friends so they can hear the upgrade to the sound, which is admirable. If you don't like it, I guess you just can't dig where Jimmy's head was at at the time-- lots of Moroccan and North Indian influences, which were still in his head 20 years later for "Unledded". But "Lucifer Rising" definitely counts among the more Avant-Guard pieces to come from a musician of Page's stature (Lennon's "Life With The Lions" would be another). It's not going to please everyone, but there's never a guarantee that you'll like every single thing your favorite artist ever puts out.
  15. walter's walker

    Religion? (Keep it civil)

    Yes, that point would have begun during the "Dark Ages" of Europe, when Islam was a shining light of medical, astronomical and mathematical knowledge. Without the Moslem preservation of the Greek classical texts, very few would have survived until today, it was the Christians who sytematically destroyed these great texts. Guys, don't forget that the Western Media's exhibition of Islam is terribly bent and warped. It focuses on extremists in the Sunni and Shi'ite sects but ignores moderate Moslems and moderate Moslem sects, like the Sufis and the Ismailis. Most Moselms, like most Christians, don't really "practice" their religion, they pay it lip service and that's about all. I'm sure most of the fellows in the Page/Plant Cairo Orchestra were ostensibly Muslims. Oh, and if you want to hear some Led Zeppelin influenced Middle-Eastern "world music," I highly suggest you give a listen to the band Junoon. They're a Sufi Rock Band very influenced by Mssrs. Page and Hendrix.
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