Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble

DBJ

Members
  • Content Count

    135
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by DBJ

  1. DBJ

    MOJO Robert Plant

    The obsessive: 1. The title Pictures at Eleven. Although this one is only mildly obsessive. It alludes to fact that is Robert's first release after the demise of LZ and coupled with the fact that it is a major departure from his previous career it is therefore newsworthy. 2. The songs Burning Down One Side as in burning down his previous image add to it the mysterious Les Paul playing guitarist that seems to enough him. 3. The song Just Like I've Never Been Gone, A song with a double meaning one about love the other veiled meaning about his return to the music scene after Led Zeppelin. 4. The song In The Mood, yet another veiled reference to his change in music style post Led Zeppelin. 5. Also the video has him hold a Lemon at one point another reference to Led Zeppelin. 6. The video for Big Log half way through the video steps on a feather crushing it. 7. The song Through With the Two Step with the lyrics "Through with the two-step, where the rhythm is law", and "Oh, yes, it's love in any key" 8. The Song Easily Lead 9. Only minor but the song Pink and Black has the Lyric People said that I won't change The song still remains the same. 10. The song Dance on My Own's veiled double meaning. 11. The song The Way I Feel 12. Tall Cool One 13. Ship of Fools 14. The song Big Love 15. The song Liars Dance 16 The song Colours Of A Shade 17. The song Tin Pan Valley 18. The song Let the Four Winds Blow All these items Robert either directly or indirectly References Led Zeppelin.
  2. DBJ

    MOJO Robert Plant

    OMG I didn't know I was talking to a Robert Plant Propagandist/Zombie I think one could extrapolate that they do generally mean the same thing. If we look at it in context Robert Plant knows from first hand experience that Page/Plant obviously did not have the same oomph as Led Zeppelin, and therefore they were not as successful as Led Zeppelin. The point he was trying to convey in that quote and paragraph is that he didn't feel that at the O2 the were worthy of being called Led Zeppelin because John Bonham wasn't, but they called themselves that anyway instead of Page/Jones/Plant because it would be more successful and raise more money and awareness for their charity. The last Page/Plant album was only certified Gold for sales. That is considered a complete failure by todays standards. Secondly, I didn't say he needs to see a therapist because he won't do what over people want him to do. Talk about twisting words. He needs to see a therapist because of his bipolar/obsessive/insecure attitude about Led Zeppelin. On moment he has wonderful things to say about it the next it's get over it. Poor Jason Bonham has been burned repeatedly by Robert Plant in interviews. Good way to honer John Bonham by repeatedly attacking his son. Summer of 2007 - Led Zeppelin are never getting back together, these rumors about a reunion concert are outrageous. A few months later yeah we're doing a concert. directly After the concert - It was great if we find a good reason we might do another, and you never now whats around the corner. Now - Why would we ever get back together again it's over. 1986 - Lets get together with Tony Thompson and see what happens - a few months later why would we ever get back together. 1991 - Lets get together and do a world tour, we'll finish the details when I get back from lunch - After Lunch I don't think so. He seems to be showing traits on manic depression here. And I can think of at least 20 occasions where Robert Plant references himself in regards to Led Zeppelin in his songs/lyrics/albums or videos. It seems to be his favorite lyrical subject matter, which is obsessive The Live Aid post show interview shows a very insecure, perhaps immature, and down right rude Robert Plant. Look I like Robert Plant very much. His music, all of it. I don't think their is a single song of his that I dislike. I have his latest single, And I think its great. It has kind of a LZ III/PG/1971 Elvis feel to it. I also Like Robert Plant as a person. I saw him at Disney MGM studios when he put his hand prints in cement. I paid $60 and spent 2 hrs at a them part just to see him. He was very polite and courteous. At the After interview it was announced before hand that their would be no autographs as he was pressed for time. Well this one chick when asking her question asked if Robert could autograph her denim jacket. The MC automatically jumped in and said no. Well Robert was kind enough to tell her that if she gave it to an usher he could sign it quickly and she could pick it up after the event. And this wasn't by any means what one would consider a hot chick. She reminded me of the lady in TSRTS with the white blouse and paints trying to buy scalped tickets outside the event. But Like Robert Plant, his music and I think he is an all around cool, good guy. But some times he has issues that show through.
  3. DBJ

    MOJO Robert Plant

    Like I said I've seen Robert Plant in concert and it was awesome, but Robert Plant with Jimmy Page was better. Still their was something missing from it all and I found a lot what was missing when I saw JPJ in concert (The Groove). From what I can tell from YOUTUBE videos is that the o2 incarnation was even better than Page and Plant. Lets look at the songs "Calling to You", and "Shake My Tree". One song from Plant, one song from Coverdale Page. Shake My Tree Coverdale/Page I find the Page/Plant version to be much better, Plant voice is much more soulful, and his voice adds a certain groove to the song. Coverdale's seem to me to be a bunch of screeching. The same is true for "Calling toYou". I think we have to put Jimmy Page in perspective, he's a 65 year old rock star. If he chooses to do nothing, that is pretty reasonable. And it is pretty reasonable for him at his age to say if it's not my full potential then I would rather not. I personally think that Page is sitting on some pretty substantial material ( especially from what snippets we've heard) . I think he doesn't want to screw it up, and is patiently wanting for Plant to come around. But indeed the sad part is that we are missing out on Page's talent. Like a simple Eric Clapton style blues standard album. Or perhaps an acoustic instrumental album.
  4. DBJ

    MOJO Robert Plant

    It was stated in the Mojo interview at the beginning of this thread. Here is the Link again I'm not an Anti Robert Plant person. I like his all his music, and I own multiple copies of everything he has done post Zeppelin including 9-Lives which is redundant. I even have the stuff like the Inner Flame, More Oar, Mumbo Jumbo, Little By Little EP, " Let that Boogie Woogie Roll", " Little Sister", Good Rockin' Tonight - The Legacy of Sun Records, Knebworth 1990, and others. I like him personally as well. I think he is a nice guy and a pretty cool guy, but all the excuses for at least merely getting together with his former band mates is wearing thin. I seriously think he needs to set down with a therapist over the whole situation. That is why I stated that I think he's not consciously exploited LZ. I mean seriously how many times in his post Led Zeppelin career has his Lyrics/Songs/Albums referenced Led Zeppelin. Their are many things that people lyrically write about: Love, Anger, Something they are passionate about, Some political cause, and in Robert Plant's case his association with Led Zeppelin (not that thats a bad things because most of his best work stems from it.) But go see a therapist
  5. DBJ

    MOJO Robert Plant

    What I am saying is I don't know if Robert Plant consciously and knowingly says to himself "gee things seem to be going a little south right now, how can I associate myself with Led Zeppelin again to regenerate interest in my career." or (most likely the case) he from time to time gives in to temptation perhaps on a subconscious level and later on regrets it. Facts are facts. Either he is doing it purposely or subconsciously. I personally think the latter, but with all the negative things he says which seems to be hurtful to others (poor Jason Bonham over the years. And Page and Jones have suffered as well.) It can be hard to tell.
  6. DBJ

    MOJO Robert Plant

    Plant argues that a Zeppelin without late drummer John Bonham, who died in 1980, did not quite merit the name, but acknowledges that "if the three of us got together and called ourselves 'Page & Jones & Plant' it wouldn't carry the same oomph."
  7. DBJ

    MOJO Robert Plant

    These are the facts of the matter: I saw Robert Plant in concert and it was awesome. Then I saw Page and Plant in concert and it was so much better. Finally I saw JPJ in concert and it was then that I discovered what was missing. The members of Led Zeppelin when they get together their is a synergistic effect. They are better than the sum of the parts. So Led Zeppelin or whatever you want to call it without Bonzo might not be better than the original, but it is so much better than just a single component. The fact is Robert Plant by himself as good as it may be, It always could be better. Perhaps Jimmy Page is the smart one here. He knows that anything without the others could only be at best second best. Look how much better Pictures at Eleven could have been if it were crossed with element from DWII Look how much better "Calling to You" and "Shake My tree" were in 1996 I would think that as a performer Robert would (at least on occasion) want to be the best he can be. One of his current excuses is that he doesn't want the head ache of all the drama it would create. Then he goes on to say that if they just called it Page/Plant/Jones it wouldn't be as successful. If you don't want the Drama then do call it Page/Plant/Jones, and that way you play in the smaller venues that you supposedly desire. Plus you would weed out all the Poser LZ fans ( one of the more enjoyable perks of the JPJ concert at the House of Blues, only real fans in attendance) As it stands now Plant comes very close to looking like he exploits LZ to boost his own career. ( Shaken N Stirred showed a decline in momentum then you have Live Aid. Manic Nirvana Showed a slight loss of momentum then you have Knebworth with Page and Rumors of a Reunion. Fate of Nations shows a definite decline in momentum and get Page/Plant. 2002 Dreamland has critical success so talk of a DVD inspired reunion in 2003 come to an end. 2005 Mighty ReArranger a little more successful as well as critically successful, but his solo career still pales in comparison to his 80's and 90's career. Led Zeppelin reunion o2 . His Raising Sand CD takes off (his most successful album ever in terms of industry accolades) and any reunion hopes disappear. ) Robert Plant often talks about the Legacy of LZ and the memory of Bonham, but nothing tarnishes those things more than exploiting LZ to further his own career. Obviously he's not doing it for the money, but perhaps even worse for his own person fame and popularity. I think the post Live Aid backstage interview with the band members tells a lot. It shows that Robert Plant has a lot of insecurities which I think makes it impossible for Robert to be part of a true band effort.( where is T-Bone?) I not saying that Plant is indeed exploiting Zeppelin, but a definite case could be made to support that
  8. It seems to me that if you really want Robert Plant to go back to Led Zeppelin, then Don't buy the album. If your a hard core fan (such as myself, I own every single LZ/RP/JP/JPJ/JB/JB item that was released in many cases multiple copies) just wait a year or two to pick it up. If I were cynical, I could make a case that every time the Solo Robert Plant starts to fade he adds a fresh dose of Led Zeppelin to his career. I think that if you look at Robert Plants solo career It has been a pretty successful one especially in terms of creative output. I'd rather listen to Robert Plant than say U2 or Def Leppard. But it pales in comparison to Led Zeppelin. I saw Robert Plant in concert in 1990. It was awesome. I saw Page/Plant in concert once in 1995 and twice in 1998. It was even better. Then I saw JPJ in concert in 2000 and found what was missing from the puzzle. I would like to see the three of them back together with their drummer of choice ( preferably Jason Bonham ). I would actually prefer it if they didn't call it Led Zeppelin to weed out all the posers. I don't even care if they play Led Zeppelin material. They can be a cover band for all I care. The fact is their is a synergy that when they get together nothing compares. The magic of Led Zeppelin is not in the songs although they are magical themselves. The magic is how well the four virtuoso performers get along together musically. Yes John Bonham is gone, and would be hard to replace him, but what remains is still magical. Jason Bonham might not be his dad, but then again his tenure With Led Zeppelin isn't even as long as the time John Bonham spent as a New Yardbird member. How does Jason Bonham compare to the John Bonham of the fall of 1968. The more time he spends with the other three the more in tune they would become. Forget all the Led Zeppelin hoopla. I don't want Led Zeppelin . I want the members of Led Zeppelin together. Who here doesn't agree that if you took Robert Plants new album and rerecorded with JPJ/JP/JB it would not be better. Look at "Calling to You" and "Shake My Tree". The Bottom Line is don't be afraid grow some balls and get back together and see what happen for better or worse, and don't go handicapping the project. Drop the Led Zeppelin name if it bothers you, and let the music speak for itself.
  9. I think this just confirms that Robert needs some psychological help/counseling over the whole Led Zeppelin subject. How many songs has he written that are in one way or another related to his Led Zeppelin legacy.
  10. I don't know how music works these days, but your can listen to the whole song via this link from Rolling Stone Song I like this song actually. It sounds like a nice combination of Led Zeppelin III and a 1970-1971 Elvis country song. The vocals are quite nice.
  11. As Jimmy gets older he seems to have more and more of an asian look to him. See for yourself
  12. DBJ

    Stairway number 1

    " yeah make room for enemaem, and the black eyed peas cause they are all the shit"
  13. They sang "All of My Love" though, which I think would be more emotionally charged. IMHO though, I think what you said was what caused Bonham's death. I think the band was really apprehensive about coming back to America. If we look at how the last U.S. tour ended. Tour had a bad vibe to begin with. Bonham and associates arrested. Led Zeppelin Banned from Tampa Plant's son dies. Concert promoter vows they will never play in America again as well as other bad things that happened. When your in a bad stressful environment, and then your removed from that environment, having to then go back to that where that stress took place can be scary. I think that is why Bonham drank so much on the eve of his death, the thought of having to return to America for another tour.
  14. I've always liked Jack White's music, but I kinda see what you mean about the poser aspect. As for The Edge, I like him, I like his music, but when I think of the guitar and guitarist he's pretty far down the line. (maybe a documentary about effects pedals would suit him) When your talking guitar and guitarist, and someone who embodied their generation as a guitarist then I think Eddie Van Halen would be a better choice than The Edge. EVH and The Edge are from the same generation (late seventies through the eighties.) When I think in terms of guitar gods: I think the 60's would be dominated by Jimi Hendrix. The seventies by Jimmy Page, The eighties by EVH. Obviously their are other guitarist that played at the same or similar level as those three, (Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Randy Rhodes, Steve Vai, Joe Satriani David Gilmour, and on and on) but I think they are the ones that influenced or defined each respective generation the most. That being said EVH would have probably ruined the film seeing as he's kinda obnoxious and somewhat childish. ( the polar opposite of Jimmy Page.) If he could control himself and humble himself it might have been good.
  15. I saw it in the theater and bought the DVD aswell. Obviously I like it. I am also a fan of all threes' music. I do fell that the edge was a little out of place. Perhaps Van Halen would have been a better choice. One of the thing that gets to me is that for example a three part documentary could have been made of the Headley Grange section alone, so it tends to make the rest of seem like fluff. Also I hate the phony posing that goes on. I guess it's the directors way of making an interesting story, but it also cuts right through to the fakeness of it. As Walt Disney would say, the magic is gone ( when you see someone carrying trash cans to be emptied through the park at Disney Land.) Example. Out of the blue The Edge asked Jimmy to tell him about Kashmir, and low and behold right next to Jimmy (The first time it appears in the Film) Sits Jimmy's Danelectro. Another one is " hey Jack! Show us that 7 Nation army riff." "Oh yeah sure. it's in a different tuning" And as Jimmy And The Edge Learn the riff their guitars just happen to be in the same alternate tuning as the song.
  16. I think an obvious reason is that Tea For One doesn't have any keyboards on it and Since I've Been Loving you does. That would like saying Jonesy we're gonna replace a song that prominently feature you on keyboards with one that doesn't. Personally I prefer Tea for One. I think it would have been proper if Page/Plant would have played Tea For One instead of SIBLY. Since they didn't have Jones, they should have done the keyboardless blues number. It could have further distinguished them from Zeppelin, and shined a spotlight on a lesser know Zeppelin tune.
  17. In terms of Jimmy saying, "If I were putting a band together." Wasn't that filmed 12, 18 maybe even close to 24 months ago? He may very well have taken his own advice by now.
  18. I always thought plant sounded worst at the very beginning (live anyway). It was powerful yeah, but not a lot of control. It also seemed on songs like C'mon Everybody from 1970 RAH that his voice sounds unnaturally lowered. I suppose the mid 70 would be would be the typical Led Zeppelin Style highpoint, but I actually like his voice the most from 1979 to about 1984. A that point he was still very capable of doing the Zeppelin Catalog, but his vocal sound much more musical. His voice from the live cuts from his early solo albums are phenomenal. I also liked his performance of late of the song "The boy who wouldn't hoe corn"
  19. This is why it should never be. Q: What is the switch on electric guitar in the top left corner like you see on Slash's guitar for? In: Guitar, Guitar Hero [Edit categories] This is a question I game across on the internet the other day. I cringe at this, not only as a Led Zeppelin Fan, but as a person who plays guitar.
  20. In terms of who was hit the hardest, my point was that outward appearances can be deceiving. Thus the last line of the first paragraph. "I don't think there is much truth to that though." A Zeppelinless Led Zeppelin is when Plant tries to reform Led Zeppelin or a part of it without calling it Led Zeppelin. ( Unledded) When Plant took his first solo project to Page he said it was good, Jones said he Thought Plant could do better. That and a desire to form a Zeppelinless Zeppelin ( ie. a band that is as close as you can get to Led Zeppelin without calling it Led Zeppelin) is why Jones was not invited to be in Unledded. Plant walked away from the Clarksdale project because the album only went Gold, and by the response the crowd gave to the new material. ( Many in attendance at the shows I went to didn't even buy the album). Plus I remember at the time at a show I was at, I had a decent seat and after they finished one of the new songs Plant kinda surveyed the audience that hadn't even really been paying attention to the song, I could tell then by the look on his face that it was over.
  21. I think it is more of a situation where that person they both liked on vocals was not available at the time. If we look at the history of Them Crooked Vultures we see that they predate the O2 Gig in December 07. If they couldn't agree on vocalist then I'm sure Page would have taken the one he liked and finished his solo album that he so urgently needs to get out (his own words) with perhaps Jason Bonham. It sounds more like to me that the project was put on the back burner, and JPJ's back burner project got moved to the front. Remember, Led Zeppelin ( post 1980 especially) always likes to come at you from out of no where. Reunion? What reunion? Did I mention we're having a reunion! oh yeah how's that new Plant Krauss album coming?
  22. You can look at it another way. It took Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones much longer to get back into making music than it did Robert. You could say they took the loss of Bonham much harder in terms of them being willing to return to performing. I don't think there is much truth to that though. According to Robert himself he did not know how to properly make a solo album on his own. (He enlisted the help of Phil Colins and relied heavily on the opinion of Page and Jones). This suggests to me he was very happy where he was with Zeppelin. If we Look through the years we see Plant very eager to reform Zeppelin, but chickens out at the last minute. What we do see Plant doing is somehow trying to Create a Zeppelinless Led Zeppelin. ( The Honey Drippers, the 1988 collaborations with Page, The 1994-1998 collaboration with Page. I think that Robert Plant's ultimate desire would be to form a band with Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, and perhaps Jason Bonham, and perform some Led Zeppelin songs ( Stairway to heaven most likely no included) of their choosing, as well as some on going new material. Their would be no speculation, and no comparison to the previous group. So the entity that is Led Zeppelin, gets in the way of Led Zeppelin (the 3 original members plus Jason Bonham) getting back together, I think that this is something that Plant has always faced. The Legacy ( the expectation, and the hoopla) gets in the way. In terms of making money off Zeppelin, The Band ( the whole Band Plant included) have been offered large fractions of a $ Billion Dollars, just to sponsor a full fledged Led Zeppelin tour multiple times. (not to mention what they would make off ticket sales plus merchandise.) The fact that he might not be getting royalties off album sales is not a valid reason to discourage him. not to mention besides album sales, I sure a lot of Zeppelin's current income comes from publishing royalties from air play. Every time you hear a Zeppelin tune on TV or the Radio, a few cents goes their way. ( how many classic Rock Station around the world are there?)
  23. I do believe the Fender amps where custom tonemaster amps. I don't believe however that the ovation was played through it. Usually acoustics, Ovations included are either played through an acoustic amp, or more commonly in larger venues straight through the P.A. system like vocals or a keyboard. electric guitar amps do not provide full spectrum audio output like p.a. systems and acoustic amps. (and ironically bass amps) Acoustic guitars require full spectrum audio to reproduce all the nuance from the acoustic guitar including the strumming of the instrument. I have an Ovation Balladeer model and have played it through several electric guitar amps as well as straight through a mixer with a rack effects processor (for reverb) and a power amp with studio monitors. The sound through the mixer was far superior than the sound through the electric amps. Through the electric guitar amps the acoustic sounded kind of flat and muffled. Another problem with using tube driven electric guitar amps is that in addition to the gain section of the amp (which can be bypassed to create the clean channel), the power section of the amp which amplifies the sound will also distort when driven at high volumes like would would find at a large concert. Further more the power tubes used in electric guitar amps are chosen for the ability the break up or distort early ( as compared to traditional usage of a vacuum tube t.v., radio, etc.). Most electric guitar amps also rely on a final stage of distortion and that is speaker distortion. The speakers designed for electric guitars, such as those designed by Celestion and others also add to the distorted effect of the electric guitar. In the early years of rock many pioneering guitarist would purposely damage the guitar speaker to get a more distorted tone. Since then there has been a movement toward creating specialized guitar speakers that attenuate this affect ( in other words there is a difference between a 12in pro audio speaker which tries to faithfully replicate sounds, and a 12in guitar amp speaker which is designed specifically to color sound). As for the reason on the two amps(vox/fender). An unaltered Vox would be a good choice for a clean sound and with the addition of the build in Tremolo effect was probably used on tracks like Blue Train ( in fact the whole Walking in to Clarksdale Album was tremolo heavy). The Tonemaster could be used to provide the heavy sound needed for many of the heavier tunes. In addition in Page's later recording (as a progression of his guitar army) Page began to employ an amp army of sorts. That is instead a over dubbing several guitars playing the same piece of music ( traditional guitar army.) Page took it a step further by taking each guitar and hooking it up to a slew of amps each one isolated from another in the studio and recorded each on a separate track. This can be extended further by using different speaker cabinets for each amp, and then even further by using different microphones. This is why Page sought out a studio in Nevada to record The Coverdale/Page album because it has a 72 track recoding studio. In theory one guitar part with various amp, cabinet and microphone choices could easily contain 72 tracks. And in fact Page stated that he did use all 72 tracks ( it was not stated whether this was for the whole song, of just for the guitar parts.) So Page could have been using the Vox and the Fender to layer the sound for a desired effect.
×
×
  • Create New...