Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble

mielazul

Members
  • Content Count

    174
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by mielazul

  1. mielazul

    Hot pics of Jimmy

    A million thanks Sue. The link was very helpful, and it led me to David Allen (who I now see has posted on this forum). What an amazing picture that is. Anyway - hope you're doing well.
  2. mielazul

    Hot pics of Jimmy

    Thanks Sue - it's been a long time since I posted here, but I always appreciated your insights. Any idea where I can get my hands on a quality print of this? You may remember that I'm a '77 fanatic, and this is the image that I've been waiting to come across - it really speaks to me, in terms of the magic of the '77 tour.
  3. mielazul

    Hot pics of Jimmy

    Can anyone tell me more about the '77 pic above? Never seen it before - I'd love to get a poster of that.
  4. "Ten Years Gone" - June 25, 1977. L.A. Forum. Jimmy is amazing on this version.
  5. Try "Burnside On Burnside" a great live album recorded by the legendary RL Burnside. You won't be disappointed.
  6. Rob was great in 77. Rough shows? Yeah, obviously the last leg of the tour especially had some difficulties. But for most of the tour, his control, his tone, his emotion...and yes his range (he gained some lows for the lost highs, to an overall advantage in my opinion) all add up to a really impressive tour for Rob. Just listen to almost any Going To California from that tour and you'll hear an emotionally deep yet professional Rob that had never been heard before.
  7. You are so very lucky.... If you ever want to write like, 500 pages about it, you have at least one avid reader here. That Kashmir performance in particular means a lot to me.
  8. mielazul

    last concert

    When you read about this in the Hoskyns book, it's kind of interesting because you get the very strong impression that Richard Cole was kind of hurt that John Bindon was brought in and was kind of edging in on his territory in a way. I say it's interesting because you don't usually think of big bad Richard Cole as having hurt feelings. There's a Disney movie in there somewhere...or maybe not.
  9. mielazul

    last concert

    I think Grant's son was just removing the sign as a souvenir. Not to justify the extreme measures taken, but you don't have to be on cocaine to get enraged when a grown man slaps your 11-year old son. There was some weak talk like the boy was just pushed...and that the kid was getting defiant when he was told to put the sign back. Fucking whatever. If you're a grown man, don't come crying to me if you start manhandling some kid and then giant papa bear shows up with his buddies. And as far as being above the law...well, they were arrested, but ended up getting off with fines for trapping a man in a trailer and beating him bloody. That might not be above the law, but it's pretty much a tap on the wrist.
  10. Yeah, I'm like following in your footsteps today, having the same reactions.
  11. Honeydrip, the Coverdale/Page album seems to be held in pretty high esteem around here by a lot of people. I love it, "Waiting On You" in particular comes to mind as a great song. The production is amazing, too. As far as Page/Plant...I thought No Quarter was brilliant, and although it was mostly Zep tunes, I loved the reworkings, especially Kashmir. I thought that live Kashmir performance was one of the high points of their career. This stuff is subjective, of course, and that opinion/feeling is wrapped up in some personal stuff. I loved Yallah, but that opinion is hard to separate from the awesome unforgettable image of them playing in that Moroccan market. Walking Into Clarksdale...well, first, I have to say that Most High is so awesome, the rest of it could be polka music...but Shining In The Light also retains some power for me. Burning Up would have been a whole new song if Steve Albini had cranked up the fucking guitar solo, which was smokin.' He really buried it for some reason. The title track is pretty cool too, but falls a little short, imo. That leaves a lot of slower songs, and I appreciated their emotion at the time, but I don't feel inclined to go back and listen to them. It's really hard for me to knock anything from that era, to be honest, because it was such a happy time to be a Zep fan. 94-98. Wow...I went to a lot of those shows, and they were all so great. Sometimes you can't separate your life experiences from your listening experiences!
  12. ^^^ Hey Monkey, there's a thread in this section under a title like "bootlegs with perfect sound and performance," or something similar to that. If you're not totally up on all the recordings that are out there, and are searching for live recordings with good sound, that might give you some ideas. I can't remember if they're mentioned, but the 5/25 and 5/30 Landover 77 soundboards that just came out under the title "Double Shot" are really good.
  13. This recording (and the story behind it) was a big thrill for me to discover when I first joined here. It's still awesome. Thanks to everybody involved for making it available and sounding so good.
  14. Just to weigh in a bit more, I do love all eras of Zep, and if I had to pick their collective, technical peak (including Plant) I think it would be the US tour of 72. Plant had his vox totally intact, and the band were just unbelievably on top of their game. Plus, that 72 tour comes with the added bonus of being a very happy time for the band, and those good vibes really came out in the shows. Having said that though, the vibe of the band onstage in the "middle later era" - mainly 77 - just sounded so fucking epic and huge...gods more than humans...and even though I like happy positive vibes as much as the next guy (and I sure need 'em these days) it's more interesting to me to have a little darkness mixed in - "light and shade" like Jimmy used to say - and you got a better mix of that in 75-77 especially. And yeah, people have really hit the nail on the head when they use the word CHAOS, ha, ha. I don't mean musically fucked up...but you can just hear the surreal insanity of their lives come out in the music...people existing on some other plane...and you can hear the insanity of the audience too. Damn, the audiences were fucking OUT OF THEIR MINDS in 77. Anyway...I'll go now and put on my black Swan Song 77 tour t-shirt.
  15. Listen To This...I'm usually happy to talk (too much) about my preference for the latter era, especially '77. But I'm on the run, and you said it pretty well, so I'll just cast my vote for now.
  16. mielazul

    Earls Court

    ^^^ Oh, one more thing, Geezer...and again this is from a maybe sketchy memory...but I remember Wall kind of finishing the book with an assessment of Page and Plant's separate careers and he kind of went with the commonly held idea that Plant was being a fresh creative artist forging ahead, and Page was kind of stuck in the past. I know a lot of people subscribe to this view, and I really wouldn't want to have to argue against it, based on the output...but personally, I'll always look at Page as someone who went to the top of the mountain, suffered for it, and created this amazing body of work that still resonates with power today. It has always seemed lame to me when people pull a "What have you done lately?" trip with Page. Ungrateful, in a way. Besides, I've said it before a few times on this forum, the show I saw on the Outrider tour was the greatest concert experience I've ever had. Some of Jimmy's great post-Zep stuff has been really below the radar. Anyway...that's about it. All the best.
  17. mielazul

    Earls Court

    Hey Geezer I kind of like these book discussions if they don't get too hostile, and I'd be glad to leaf through it and respond to you in detail...but it's been a while, and I don't have it anymore. Like I said, I recycled it. I seem to recall Wall inserting himself into the story frequently in ways that seemed self-serving...and I wouldn't have minded this if the other parts of the book that weren't about him didn't seem to be lifted from other people's books. It seemed like a weak cash-in effort, in other words. And I believe he even tried to do lengthy segments where he was purporting to write the thoughts of band members...pretty ridiculous for anyone, let alone an enigma like Page...and really crass with Bonzo, in my opinion. And I just don't like Wall, based on interviews I've seen of him. Not a good reason to not like the book, I know...but that annoying personality seemed to seep through all the pages. Anyway, that's the best I can do for you after a few years have passed. It's all just my opinion. If you enjoyed the book, that's great.
  18. mielazul

    Earls Court

    I think it's ridiculous to dismiss Hammer of the Gods as crap, in spite of its problems. Stephen Davis is a talented writer, and he took the Zeppelin story and presented it in a very captivating mythological form. Granted, it was Zeppelin that built this mythology...LIVED IT, actually...but Davis crafted it - and crafted it well - into an ENORMOUSLY influential book. Richard Cole was pretty fucking good source to snag at the time, no matter his desperation or willingness to embellish. And although he was betraying their loyalty to a great degree, I thought his admiration for them, and his old bonds with them, shone through at all times - even in the unflattering parts - giving the story a poignant tone. I think it's equally ridiculous that the same people who knock Davis will give Hoskyns a pass as a serious writer. Trampled Underfoot was a gripping read, but Hoskyns hid behind his role as "editor and arranger of quotes," and let a lot of petty bitter people spill their bile without bothering to give perspective to some of their tales. I thought Wall's book sucked, but I don't feel like being a literary critic about it. Let's put it this way - I'm such a Zep fan, I save basically everything, no matter how disappointing it is. But with Wall's book, I ripped out the pictures (some cool ones, I must admit) and recycled it.
  19. mielazul

    Earls Court

    I got one of the early releases of Earl's Court - I think the Cosmic Energy version. It was great to have, but I felt that the drum sound was really weak...way back in the mix and distant. Have the newer releases improved on that much? Like "In the Court of King James," for example?
  20. March 25, 1975 is a very good one.
  21. Robert Plant is a big fan of Tinariwen, and I would really recommend seeing them play if you have the chance.
  22. I also love 6/25/72 - they sounded so joyous then, especially on Bron Yr Aur Stomp. I always think of summer 72 as the tour with the most positive vibe. Generally, the 77 acoustic sets are my favorite, and just off the top of my head I'm thinking of 4/28/77 as one that really moved me. 6/21 is great...so many from 77.
  23. I have more problems with DVDs. They come straight out of the case - brand new - and they have odd glitches in them...or worse, they freeze at certain points and won't go forward. I have a couple players at home - three, if you count the computer - and I can tell the problem is definitely with the DVD. Not all of them, not most of them...but too damn many, that's for sure. I think there was even a small problem on Celebration Day - I kind of remember that being discussed somewhere. I have no idea why this is happening, but like you Scarlett, I've noticed that the old discs don't have these problems.
  24. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_peSCECc4I Hope you guys like it.
×
×
  • Create New...