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Millennial ZepHead

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About Millennial ZepHead

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    New Member
  • Birthday 03/28/1984

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    Female
  • Location
    Montreal, Canada

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  1. However, there is such a thing as being a gracious winner, which clearly, uh...yeah.
  2. http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/jimmy-page-on-led-zeppelins-enduring-rock-legacy/ "It seems that it were up to Jimmy Page they would be on the road in a heartbeat. But Robert Plant just doesn't want to do it." And you know what, you are absolutely right, it is selfish of me to want Robert to do it even if he doesn't want to. I guess the whole point of this exercise was to try and implore him to think about the reasoning behind and his source of reservations differently. He's never come right out and said, "I don't want to because I'm not interested in it anymore." He's always either teased with the idea or alluded to his reasoning out of respect for John's legacy. And, as I say earlier, that specific reasoning does not ring true to me. To be honest, I do think that Robert just isn't interested in it anymore. But I don't think he could ever come out and say that risk being crucified by the rest of the Zeppelin-loving world. And especially after all that has unfolded here on this forum I am letting it go. So rejoice "realists" you have won! (And that is also why the letter was never put on social media, because it was my intention to "test the waters" for interest, first.) Led Zeppelin was not Robert's love child the same way as it was for Jimmy Page. The point of my letter is that I just wished he felt differently, but alas, it just isn't meant to be. However, as Jimmy says in this interview, "he could always take voice lessons..."
  3. Steve Jones, I actually am on facebook under another name not far from my full name, as undersigned. So, by your own logic and your own obvious credibility issues to spend more than a nano second on your research before stating your opinion are equally obvious. It would be different if you had all other remainig band members expressing equally that they have no interest in reforming. Then, my point of view woukd obviously be futile. Also, if Axyl Rose wanted to reform who would you be to get in the way? The music doesn't belong to you. I'm sure if they did people would go to see them as well. But it's not so, which one of these three pints of view are unlike the other. At this point I almost wish Robert would come right out and say he doesn't want to do it simply because he disn't want to. Then, my opinion would rightfully be put to rest. But as far as your "begrudging acceptance" of the situation I feel sorry for you. Because if history was so similarly founded on begrudging acceptance we would still be a segregated nation refusing to give women an equal vote. And if you're simply disinterested in reformation may I suggest that you re-evaluate your position as a fan of simply the original music, not that of the band. Okay, I'm not being bated anymore. I wish all of you well, your position on the matter notwithstanding. Millennial Zephead.
  4. Steve Jones, I actually am on facebook under another name not far from my full name, as undersigned. So, by your own logic and your own obvious credibility issues to spend more than a nano second on your research before stating your opinion are equally obvious. It would be different if you had all other remainig band members expressing equally that they have no interest in reforming. Then, my point of view woukd obviously be futile. Also, if Axyl Rose wanted to reform who would you be to get in the way? The music doesn't belong to you. I'm sure if they did people would go to see them as well. But it's not so, which one of these three pints of view are unlike the other. At this point I almost wish Robert would come right out and say he doesn't want to do it simply because he disn't want to. Then, my opinion would rightfully be put to rest. But as far as your "begrudging acceptance" of the situation I feel sorry for you. Because if history was so similarly founded on begrudging acceptance we would still be a segregated nation refusing to give women an equal vote. And if you're simply disinterested in reformation may I suggest that you re-evaluate your position as a fan of simply the original music, not that of the band. Okay, I'm not being bated anymore. I wish all of you well, your position on the matter notwithstanding. Millennial Zephead.
  5. Steve Jones, I actually am on facebook under another name not far from my full name, as undersigned. So, by your own logic and your own obvious credibility issues to spend more than a nano second on your research before stating your opinion are equally obvious. It would be different if you had all other remainig band members expressing equally that they have no interest in reforming. Then, my point of view is obviously futile. But it's not so, which one of these three pints of view are unlike the other. At this point I almost wish Robert would come right out and say he doesn't want to do it simply because he disn't want to. Then, my opinion would rightfully be put to rest. But as far as your "begrudging acceptance" of the situation I feel sorry for you. Because if history was so similarly founded on begrudging acceptance we would still be a segregated nation refusing to give women an equal vote. And if you're simply disinterested in reformation may I suggest that you re-evaluate your position as a fan of simply the original music, not that of the band. Okay, I'm not being bated anymore. I wish all of you well, your position on the matter notwithstanding. Millennial Zephead.
  6. Okay everyone, I have waited awhile to respond to this topic because I was interested in seeing how the subject developed. I do have to say, as a young and perhaps unnecessarily enthusiastic and naive member of the forum, the apathy and resignation exhibited by these responses is APPALLING, and demonstrates exactly why I felt it necessary to write this letter in the first place. The problem in your thinking is precisely where the issue lays. Don't you think, that if you were John Bonham you would want the celebration of your memory to be positive above anything else and PROACTIVE?? Isn't this precisely why, in the celebration of life we oftentimes tell stories of the deceased, or look into and re-asses their creations and achievements to re-live their contributions and understand (again) why that person was so special to begin with? We don't got to people's funerals and say, "well, we would play this person's music/look at their art/read their poetry, but they're irreplaceable, so it would be irreverent to do so." Absolutely not. And if you disagree with this, why do you think Jimmy and JPJ have been so ready and willing to reunite and do it in the first place??? It is a completely unnecessary and myopic view of death and legacy that I really don't understand (thus, my letter). I'm not blaming this entirely on Robert, and I'm not trying to demonize him. I am simply imploring him to re-evaluate his motive, because he seems to be the only one with this position. Plus, he has never actually come out and said (except indirectly in the Richard Branson piece) that he simply doesn't want to do it. In fact, he has done several other things that would lead one to believe quite the contrary. And if he did come right out and say it, regardless of what the other remaining two and a half band members think (that is a whole other discussion) I (and I imagine quite a few other "hopefuls") would have a whole lot more respect for his position. So yeah, is this discussion "over done"? Probably. Do I care? Not really. Because what I am trying to say here, I believe, is new. Or, at least, of my extensive search of the topics related to this discussion on this forum leads me to believe that it is. What I'm asking for is a re-evaluation of the idea of reunion not simply for the money (and I guess that would be okay too) BUT FOR THE LOVE OF THE MUSIC. Robert has repeatedly, and again recently said that he loves and respects the music of Zeppelin, and I would be damn certain that if they reformed again EVERY SINGLE ONE OF YOU would at least consider the prospect of seeing it, if done for the right reasons and for the respect and celebration of everything for which this band stands!!! Who gives a shit if they're old, or "incapable" or whatever, get your heads out of your asses and stop being so ageist! If they did it because they wanted to and because they loved performing (which Jimmy has repeatedly said he has been ready to do, and obviously Jason and JPJ have no problem with either) who cares if it wasn't exactly like the past?? In fact, I hope it wouldn't be, because the evolution of life and love is what being human is all about. I will say no more. Sincerely, Millennial Zephead.
  7. Hello Everyone, In the wakes of the story of Robert "ripping up" the $800 contract offered by Richard Branson, the following is a letter written by myself and a few other "hopefuls" characterizing our still undying hope for a reunion tour. It asks Mr. Plant to reconsider his decision from another perspective. By using the power of social media (and armed with the knowledge that these forums are occasionally monitored by people directly related to the organization), we are hoping to circulate it, in the hopes that he or one of his people might see it and ponder the idea, for what it's worth. If you feel the same way, please feel free to share or post this, wherever you see fit. I know this has been rehashed to death, and thoughts on it are greatly appreciated, but true love knows no defeat, right? Thank you, Millennial ZepHead An Open Letter to Robert Plant: By now all of us Led Zeppelin fans have read the various accounts by the Huffington Post, The Daily Globe and others about how you put the last, and final rumors of a reunion to rest by “ripping up” an $800 million dollar contract in front of your band mates and the world. Regardless of whether or not this story is true, suffice it to say that the finality of the news that a reunion after the 2007 show at the O2 arena will never be possible is a tough pill for Zeppelin fans to swallow¾especially for those of us that will gladly admit that we still live and die daily by the music you made, 34 years after the death of your good mate and band. And although I know that your decision is clear -- and your conviction is indeed noble, and quite understandable-- there are a few things that I, and a few other diehard “Zep Heads” would like you to know: Although it’s clearly not about the potential money to be made (even though $800 million is a sum admittedly beyond that which me, or any other mere mortal could ever even fathom or comprehend), your concerns that a tour would “…be an absolute menagerie of vested interests and the very essence of everything that's shitty about big-time stadium rock,” or that reformation would be nothing but the result of boredom or having nothing to do other than “being a part of a jukebox,” I believe, are misguided. As I respectively have to disagree with you on this for several different reasons, which, incidentally, have absolutely nothing to do with money, but have everything to do with love, passion, human connection, and an amalgam of other reasons which made yours the greatest band in the world in the first place. Led Zeppelin was about innovation. It was a band that took from those before it and created music that transcended generations, cultures, spiritual mediums and musical boundaries to become a textbook example of the pure magic created by incredible chemistry -- a phenomenon still belonging only to the experience of your fans, new and old, every time they hear a Led Zeppelin song. As Jimmy Page so eloquently put it last month, Led Zeppelin was “an affair of the heart.” Few bands have been privileged to know it before you and few have known it since. It was never really about money as much as it was about preserving and staying true to your sound. This is why your legacy has been so closely guarded, and why I understand (but do not condone) your decision not to tour again. However, keeping that legacy in mind, I implore you to see the opportunity from a different angle -- one perhaps not so focused on the scant, lucrativeness of the whole thing, but instead from the same place of innovation and inner desire to stay true to the music you have protected for so long. Let me be clear: nobody is asking you to be a jukebox. There are some fans that are just as ambivalent about “Stairway to Heaven” as you are. However, the chance to bring Zeppelin back is the opportunity of a lifetime to recreate the magic in your own way, not to revisit or emulate the past. This is your chance to positively complete the legacy that was so unfairly snatched from the band at the expense and terrible tragedy of your friend -- a chance to have a happy ending predicated on a predetermined path. You don’t want to play music from the past? That’s fine. Feel free to innovate and create new experiences to your heart’s content. The fans will come. You’ve been doing it on your own for over twenty years now, and you’ve been doing it with The Sensational Space Shifters as late as last week. But please, finish what you started, only this time on your terms and executed however you see fit -- with the distinct wisdom and perspective forty years of reflection on the original experience can give. How many of us would rewrite the past Robert if given the chance? What other band or musician would give up the opportunity to change the trajectory of music (again)? Nobody is expecting you to disturb the legend, or exhume the corpses of the dead. All we are asking for is a chance to see the magic of the four of you on stage together, while you take advantage of the fact that you would have the entire world’s attention to play or do whatever it is you wanted to do as a new iteration of the band. This is especially relevant with Jason stepping in for his dad. We don’t want to see you simply for the Song to Remain the Same, we want to see you because, for most of us, it would be the holy grail of musical experiences to walk amongst The Hammer of the Gods, regardless of what you play, or how you play it again. So please Mr. Plant, consider this modest, heartfelt plea to reconsider your choice. Do it for those of us who weren’t lucky enough to be born yet at a time when Led Zeppelin was going strong. Do it for every singer or guitar player you have inspired to pick up an instrument, or fall in love with music because of the legacy of your great band. The history books are calling you, and so are the next two generations of fans who have been waiting for this their entire lives. But most importantly Robert, do it for the music, new and old. And do it for your friend, who surely would prefer you to honor his legacy by definitively closing the chapter of Zeppelin with empowered positivity, and love for all the things and experiences it has brought to your life and others’ for so long. You honor music by playing it. Led Zeppelin’s music should be embraced so that it may be sufficiently honored and cherished for many generations to come, not apotheosized and avoided as if some mystical, endangered species incapable of roaming the Earth again. So please Robert, I implore you, take the time to view this from an alternate perspective, as we all know that this opportunity will probably never come again. Sincerely, Dayan Hochman Millennial Positivist and Tri-decadal Led Zeppelin fan
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