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sam_webmaster

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About sam_webmaster

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    LEDZEPPELIN.COM ADMIN

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    http://www.ledzeppelin.com

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    Great White North

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  1. sam_webmaster

    Random Newspaper Articles

    The Song Remains the Same soundtrack - attempted review...
  2. sam_webmaster

    Robert Plant - Love Rocks NYC Benefit

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    Beacon Theatre, NY loverocksnyc.com All proceeds will benefit God's Love We Deliver NYC
  3. sam_webmaster

    Zeppelin Mysteries Hosted by Steve A. Jones

    That's from the Teen-Clubs Copenhagen newsletter/programme, March 1969. http://www.ledzeppelin.com/show/march-15-1969 The photo was taken in Sept. '68. We do have a print of it in the band's archive, but no others from this exact session that I recall. There's also a few from this session, which is from generally the same time:
  4. sam_webmaster

    Led Zeppelin 50th Anniversary

    "Led Zeppelin Day" proclaimed today in Denver on 50th anniversary of band's first US concert Fifty years ago today, December 26, 1968, Led Zeppelin played its first ever concert in the U.S., opening a show for Vanilla Fudge at Colorado’s Denver Auditorium Arena. In honor of the milestone, the Mayor’s Office of the City and County of Denver has proclaimed today “Led Zeppelin Day.” To commemorate the show, a plaque and a sculpture depicting Led Zeppelin’s Denver performance has been created by a local artist. It’ll be presented to the Colorado Music Hall of Fame at a special event next year and will go on permanent display at the institution in Morrison, Colorado. The event may also feature an exhibit of Led Zeppelin memorabilia and guest appearances. As the Hall of Fame’s executive director, Chris Daniels, explains, Vanilla Fudge had to convince local promoter Barry Fey to include Led Zeppelin on the concert bill by offering to pay half of Zeppelin’s requested $1,500 fee out of their own proceeds from the show. “Thanks to the mayor for helping to promote the long history of music in Colorado and to the family of Barry Fey, who had the vision to bring a young British band to Colorado for their debut concert in the U.S.,” Daniels says in a statement. According to LedZeppelin.com, the songs that the band played at its first U.S. show were “Train Kept a Rollin’,” “I Can’t Quit You Baby,” “As Long as I Have You,” “Dazed and Confused,” “White Summer/Black Mountainside” and “How Many More Times.” Interestingly, the Denver concert also featured a set by Spirit, the band whose song “Taurus” Led Zeppelin has been accused of ripping off to create “Stairway to Heaven.” Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. http://www.classichitsandoldies.com/v2/98516/
  5. sam_webmaster

    Led Zeppelin Day

    Also see this thread for related posts:
  6. sam_webmaster

    Led Zeppelin 50th Anniversary

    news report: Led Zeppelin played their first U.S. show in Denver Author: Mike Grady https://www.9news.com/article/entertainment/led-zeppelin-played-their-first-us-show-in-denver/73-c7a932b8-a914-43ea-a416-e260a278b2b9 Dec. 28, 1968: It was a historic night and a loud introduction of a band to a new country. Colorado is a beautiful place to play music. Whether it’s strumming a guitar while swinging in a hammock in the mountains or playing to a sold-out crowd at Red Rocks. It’s something many musicians have learned over the years, and something one group of rock-and-roll legends first learned half a century ago. “Led Zeppelin was added to a bill that was headlined by Vanilla Fudge and Spirit at the Auditorium Arena. It was a sold out show the day after Christmas in 1968,” G. Brown explained. Brown is the executive director of Colorado Music Experience and has been covering the music scene in town since he was 15. He can easily recall the story of Led Zeppelin’s first U.S. concert that night in Denver. “Led Zeppelin’s agent, the soon-to-be omnipotent Frank Barcelona, called Barry Fey - the local promoter - and asked him if he’d put them on the bill,” Brown said. “Fey said no because there was no need. The show was sold out. Barcelona drove a hard bargain asked if they could get paid 500 bucks. Fey said sure. Led Zeppelin - not even on the ticket - showed up, did an opening set that apparently wowed the crowd, and set them on their path to stardom.” It was early in the band’s career. Guitarist Jimmy Page had the most experience touring from his time playing in The Yardbirds. Other band members had to adjust a lot more to life on the road, including singer Robert Plant. “[He] was 20 years old,” Brown said. “He tells the story about how it was the end of the world for him to be away from England over Christmas. He also told me in later years that he definitely recalled that he couldn’t believe that the promoter could charge the backstage catering back to the band,” Brown said with a laugh. “That was his introduction to the fabulous concert biz.” The show is documented in Thomas MacCluskey’s review for the Rocky Mountain News. “The concert was ranked off by another heavy, the Led Zeppelin, a British group making its first U.S. tour,” MacCluskey wrote. A photo of Page sawing on his guitar with a violin bow appears in the band’s book: LED ZEPPELIN BY LED ZEPPELIN published by Real Art Press. “Reportedly, at the Denver show, they debuted things that would become their trademarks in concert,” Brown said. “Jimmy Page taking a bow to his guitar strings, and John Bonham playing an extended drum solo.” It was a historic night and a loud introduction of a band to a new country.
  7. sam_webmaster

    Led Zeppelin 50th Anniversary

    50 Years Ago today, Led Zeppelin played their first American concert in Denver. Here's a radio interview with promoter Barry Fey (from 2012): December 26, 2018 The Denver Auditorium Hosted The First Live Led Zeppelin Concert in the U.S. on December 26, 1968. To Honor This Occasion, Feyline and The Pineapple Agency Collaborate With City and County of Denver to Proclaim the Day "Led Zeppelin Day." DENVER (PRWEB) - Today is the 50th anniversary of the first live performance of English rock legends Led Zeppelin in the U.S., which occurred at the Denver Auditorium on December 26, 1968. To commemorate this date as one of the most important moments in rock and roll history, the City and County of Denver's Mayor Office has proclaimed December 26th Led Zeppelin Day, where a plaque will be presented to the Colorado Music Hall of Fame at an upcoming special event in 2019. Fans of the iconic band may not know the Denver Auditorium was the first venue to host Led Zeppelin in America. At the time, late concert promoter Barry Fey almost turned down the act. In order to convince Fey, headline act Vanilla Fudge paid half the cost to book Led Zeppelin, adding them to the lineup just 10 days prior to the show. Many in the crowd had no idea the group was added. Those who were there were reportedly so impressed they flooded the local FM rock station KLZ with calls requesting to hear the band. "Congratulations to Colorado music fans and the family of concert promoter Barry Fey (inducted in 2012) for the Mayor and City of Denver's proclamation designating December 26, 2018 as Led Zeppelin Day commemorating the band's legendary 1st U.S. appearance right here in Denver in 1968," said Chris Daniels, Executive Director of the Colorado Music Hall of Fame. "Thanks to the Mayor for helping to promote the long history of music in Colorado and to the family of Barry Fey, who had the vision to bring a young British band to Colorado for their debut concert in the U.S. They opened for Vanilla Fudge at the old Denver Auditorium. Back then tickets were just $5 and the band was paid a total of $1,500, half of which came from Vanilla Fudge's proceeds from the concert. The Colorado Music Hall of Fame presented by Comfort Dental will be proud and honored to display the plaque at our home at the Trading Post at Red Rocks."
  8. sam_webmaster

    Merry Christmas!

  9. sam_webmaster

    LED ZEPPELIN OFFICIAL ILLUSTRATED BOOK - COMING 2018

    Rare group portrait during rehearsals at Manticore Studios in London, January 1977 for the upcoming tour of America. Seen for the first time in the official 50th anniversary book ‘Led Zeppelin by Led Zeppelin’ published by ReelArtPress. Photo ©Pennie Smith.
  10. sam_webmaster

    LED ZEPPELIN OFFICIAL ILLUSTRATED BOOK - COMING 2018

    Rare photos from the Whisky a-Go-Go, West Hollywood, CA, January 1969. Seen for the first time in the official 50th anniversary book 'Led Zeppelin by Led Zeppelin' published by ReelArtPress (Photos courtesy of Robert Plant)
  11. sam_webmaster

    LED ZEPPELIN OFFICIAL ILLUSTRATED BOOK - COMING 2018

    Earliest known portrait session of the band from 1968. This contact sheet is seen for the first time in the official 50th anniversary book 'Led Zeppelin by Led Zeppelin' published by ReelArtPress. Photo courtesy of Pat Bonham.
  12. sam_webmaster

    Rush's Geddy Lee On Interviewing John Paul Jones For His Upcoming Book

    Rush’s Geddy Lee Talks Massive New Bass Book, Meeting John Paul Jones Lee details the “treasure hunt” obsession that fueled his ‘Big Beautiful Book of Bass’ and how the project revitalized his creative process https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/rush-geddy-lee-bass-book-interview-767961/ Excerpt: Q: A cool side perk of writing this book was that you got to interview so many iconic bassists. Obviously Led Zeppelin was a huge influence on early Rush, so it’s fitting that you spoke with John Paul Jones. Geddy: First of all, he’s an incredibly lovely guy. If you ever have the opportunity to sit down with one of your heroes, it’s never an easy situation — it’s always a bit nerve-racking, and you never know what to expect. When I started putting the book together, I realized, “This kind of book can be really dry. How do you bring these pieces of wood and plastic and metal to life? You show the people who played them.” That led me on two directions: stock photographs going back to the period that show the people that I listened to holding these instruments; through my memories and nostalgia we have a connection between that instrument, the time it was made, and the bands in England or the U.S. that were playing them. The other thing is talking to people who played them or collected them and can bring more insight than I can possibly bring in my seven-, eight-year experience collecting. I could have very happily done a book of nothing but talks with bass players. But it wasn’t just about just choosing the greatest bass players in the world — that’s an endless list, and there are a lot of guys I would have loved to sit down with for an hour or two; but if they didn’t have a strong connection to the theme of the collection, then I didn’t feel it was appropriate to call them up. John, for example, was perfect for me because a) he was such an influential player in my life; b) he plays what I consider the greatest period of Fender Jazz Bass, a ’62, on all those early Zep albums; and c) he’s a lovely guy. He’s the perfect combination of someone to interview. He took my request very seriously. I sent him a letter saying, “Here’s what Im doing. I would love to sit down with you for an hour and talk about your first or favorite instrument.” He showed up ant my place in the U.K., paid for his own taxi, brought two basses with him, came over for the afternoon. He originally used this bass that he no longer owned. He actually tracked one down and purchased it so he could show me what his original bass was like. That shows the level of seriousness of the person. We just had a great talk. What I really wanted to get out of people like him and Bill Wyman were their memories and motivation — what was it like in the early Sixties to go shopping for a bass? We’re talking about basses that are 50, 60 years old now, but there are a few guys around still who knew what was available to a young player in London in the late Fifties, early Sixties. What kind of basses did you dream of owning? How were these basses that are in the book acquired, and could you afford to acquire them? All these bassists began their lives on cheaper instruments, and they made do with what they could get and aspired to these better ones. It was really fascinating. (2010 photo)
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    Fredriksten Fortress Halden, Ostfold https://link.seated.com/0aa89ec5-d2c3-4dd6-860c-2d137899323e
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    Svalbard Huset Longyearbyen, Svalbard https://link.seated.com/77babffd-d98e-4125-ab91-33f9d81662a8
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