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pezdel

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  1. From what I remember, Frampton Comes Alive was hot.. From Wikipedia: "The album reached number one on the Billboard 200 the week ending April 10, 1976 and was in the top spot for a total of 10 weeks. It was the best-selling album of 1976, selling over 6 million copies in the U.S. and became the best-selling live album of all time. Frampton Comes Alive! was voted "Album of the year" in the 1976 Rolling Stone readers poll." Just the other day, for the first time in years, I heard "Do You Feel Like We Do" in the car. Got home and listened to it in the driveway to hear the whole thing. Certainly not Zeppelin, but what a fun song.
  2. [iIRC]... A few months back, the documentary "The House that Ahmet built" was shown on PBS. During the Zeppelin-era of the program, Robert and Ahmet are talking while they are watching clips of ALS at Knebworth (really intense segments of the song). Robert mentions to Ahmet that a girlfriend was watching the concert on TV when he got up to leave for a minute. She stopped him saying, "Don't you leave me alone with that music!". Smiling, Robert nudges Ahmet and says "What a really great line, huh?". [/iIRC] She knew there was something visceral/primal about that recording.
  3. And its been "In Through the Out Door"ed, too.
  4. Can't say enough about "Babe". Especially the first time he sings the chorus. Starting at about ~2:08... Jimmy is soflty plucking on the acoustic, while a single background note slowly builds/ascends, then at ~2:22, Robert belts out the chorus' first "Baaabe", where the end of the word has this sharp upward hook that is so strong and in control - he just plain nails it!! I don't want to spoil the mood, but I understand Robert looked up to Elvis quite a bit, and this upward hook-thing, just reminds me of the control he (Elvis) had with his voice. I wonder if Robert had any sort of emulation in mind when he hit that word?
  5. I've always been curious why the back cover photo on LZ III shows Robert in a "tinted" color, whereas the other mates are black and white (see photo below). What is the significance of the norse-style cross that he is wearing (as it's tinted a different color than everything else in the photo)? I presume it has something to do with the Viking imagery of the Immigrant Song. (Hopefully you won't blast me, but yes, I did do a search both here and Wikipedia before posting these questions). Thanks.
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