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McSeven

Favorite Robert Plan Vocal era

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So which period of Zep do like Roberts Voice? I like Early Robert which is basically Led Zep 1 and 2. There is so much raw soul to his voice. More personality to his voice. There is a rawness that I love.

In the middle years his voice sort of became high and airy. I like that for certain songs. It just lack grit.

I guess I would compare Roberts voice was more earthy and blusey. Then he went through his mystical phase. Zep 3 to HOTH. PG sounds like he amalgamated his Raw voice and Mystical voice.

Mc7

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I like the early Zep, too. I agree with you about his voice in the middle years. Nothing beats those early years!

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1969-71

(this period in between isn't my favorite Plant vocal era. He wrote some amazing lyrics during this time though.)

1979-85

(I stopped following Plant's career after around 85 or so. I listened to some of what he was doing, but I didn't have much of an interest in most of it.)

This is all based off of recordings. I never got the chance to see LZ or Plant live.

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The first album.

Nothing in the whole songography matches the power of the first album, in my opinion. Everything from the 'babe, I'm out' part of You Shook Me to the 'in the sights of my... guuuunnn!' from How Many More Times is Plant at his vocal peak with LZ.

Although, I will say that LZ II-PG is the "classic Plant sound" and the one I most identify with the band.

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God-how to narrow it down?! I'd say probably the Strange Sensation era (2002-2005?) followed by the period from Fate of Nations thru Clarksdale (93-98). But I also love a few tunes from the 80's (Ship of Fools, Big Log, Moonlight in Samosa, Young Boy Blues). My faves are the ballads, but I listen to lots of Zep, P&P & Plant's stuff from 93-2005. Also love the 2 tracks on the Domino tribute.

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Robert's voice is just as unique as an instrument and it's quite special that there are certain era's where his voice went through sometimes subtle, sometimes not so subtle changes. The first Zeppelin album is one of the pinnacles of any singer... as described above it is full of raw power. You can hear the blues dripping from his vocal chords and you also get to hear a young, still new-to-the-world musician who had yet to experience all the things that would shape, and change, his world in future years.

The two follow up albums, II and III, saw subtle changes yet I defy anyone to find a more powerful performance than Immigrant Song. When performed live and he would enter with that opening wail... Ahhh ahh ahhhh...ahhhh! My God man... it was as if the voice of God was speaking to you.

With the next album he seemed to develop more control and more range in his voice. See Going To California... This is what separates Plant from anyone else in rock or pop music. To go from Immigrant Song to Going To California is simply amazing and he did it with total ease.

When I saw the thread title I immediately thought of one era... as I always do... when considering what is Plant's best era. Perhaps I should rephrase that... maybe not his best, but the one I prefer the most. It is the era that began with In Through The Outdoor and culminated with Principle Of Moments.

Those two albums, along with Pictures At Eleven are, to me, the essential Plant voice. Smooth as honey... Just listen to Burning Down One Side, Moonlight In Samosa, All My Love, Big Log or In The Mood for perfect examples of his voice in perfect harmony with the song. Just sheer perfection.

He could still sing the blues, as evidenced by I'm Gonna Crawl and Slow Dancer, but his blues were now a bit more mature. His range was phenomenal during this era... check out any live version of In The Mood during the 1983 tour when he went into the extended I've been away so long... I've been away so long... section.

So... while it's tough to not vote for the first few Zeppelin albums era, I still would choose the 1979-1984 era. He was older, more mature, his voice able to do anything he wanted it to do. What is amazing about Plant is you could pick any era of his and have great arguments for that particular era. The man is simply a legend.

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1969-1975, for me. Towards the end of Zeppelin his voice got more scratchy, I think. but his voice in the '80's was really good. :D

:peace:,

Jo

P.S. To Dr. Death, I love your signature!

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Got to agree with others that on the first album is when I enjoy Plants voice the best, amazing stuff.

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Early Zep was great, but I think the later years gave his voice some character. For example, I don't think the Robert Plant who sang Whole Lotta Love could have pulled off I'm Gonna Crawl quite the same way.

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There are different strengths to the different periods because his voice has changed, and his approach accordingly also. To me he is the best rock singer of them all. One of my favorite examples is certainly Night Flight. No simple delivery of the melodic line anywhere really, he keeps making these changes throughout, and what he is really doing is he's constantly building the song. It's simply a perfect job.

I agree about the first years of LZ. If you take the first album (and the sessions for that) BIGLY certainly comes to mind, but also the tribute to Bert Berns (Baby, Come on Home) - just, wow! He had a lot of range, but what is really astounding is the sheer power behind all the notes and the fact that he was only 20 - because artistically too it's great.

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During the early LZ years, Robert Plant was simply astonishing. His vocal range was unbelievable and as Otto put so well, Robert was still very young and artistically so mature, it's really amazing.

But his voice changed... and I really can't see any problem in it. He learned to use his voice in wonderful ways, he was and still is a fantastic singer, in my opinion, the best ever.

And I really like his voice in ITTOD too. Some people say that it isn't his best, I just can't agree. I really love his singing on this album as well on his first two solo works. I also think that now he sounds even better than he did as he was in his mid forties. His singing in Dreamland and Mighty Rearranger is awesome, he sounds like never before: more mature, more conciuos of his vocal power, he knows very well how to use his best now. And though I have always said that I'm not a big Raising Sand fan, I have to admit that his singing on this album is even better than much of his singing as he was younger.

It's amazing how Plant still can surprise us.

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One thing is for sure--NO ONE and I mean NO ONE has that voice. You know the moment you hear it who it is. Loved him since the beginning, the middle and now- and hopefully much more to come.

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During the early LZ years, Robert Plant was simply astonishing. His vocal range was unbelievable and as Otto put so well, Robert was still very young and artistically so mature, it's really amazing.

But his voice changed... and I really can't see any problem in it. He learned to use his voice in wonderful ways, he was and still is a fantastic singer, in my opinion, the best ever.

And I really like his voice in ITTOD too. Some people say that it isn't his best, I just can't agree. I really love his singing on this album as well on his first two solo works. I also think that now he sounds even better than he did as he was in his mid forties. His singing in Dreamland and Mighty Rearranger is awesome, he sounds like never before: more mature, more conciuos of his vocal power, he knows very well how to use his best now. And though I have always said that I'm not a big Raising Sand fan, I have to admit that his singing on this album is even better than much of his singing as he was younger.

It's amazing how Plant still can surprise us.

:yesnod: :yesnod: :yesnod:

Couldn't have put it better. I am not someone who thinks his voice in the early days was the best and somehow because he stopped wailing, that he therefore can't sing anymore, or sing as well. Yeah the wail was great and that raw bluesy power was unlike anything anyone ever heard but I also love how over time his voice has developed and changed and some of his most passionate singing can be found songs like "Your Long Journey" or "All the King's Horses".

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:yesnod: :yesnod: :yesnod:

Couldn't have put it better. I am not someone who thinks his voice in the early days was the best and somehow because he stopped wailing, that he therefore can't sing anymore, or sing as well. Yeah the wail was great and that raw bluesy power was unlike anything anyone ever heard but I also love how over time his voice has developed and changed and some of his most passionate singing can be found songs like "Your Long Journey" or "All the King's Horses".

:yesnod:

Agree with both of you.

I've said it several times, what amazes me the most of Robert Plant as a singer is not his range or power, but the way he pours his heart into his singing and carries the feeling with him. He knows how to use his voice and to reach other people.

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Oh, good, you've all said it so I don't need to. :D

I don't think the quality of his singing has anything to do with how high he can go, and never did.

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Couldn't have put it better.

Oh, yes, you could!!!!! :lol: :lol:

Sometimes my English is so childish :slapface: , but anyway I was able to make you understand what I think. B)

But really, it isn't that difficult, because great minds think alike. ;)

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Oh, yes, you could!!!!! :lol: :lol:

Sometimes my English is so childish :slapface: , but anyway I was able to make you understand what I think. B)

But really, it isn't that difficult, because great minds think alike. ;)

Your English is fantastic my friend :kiss:

Great minds do think alike <_<

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Oh, yes, you could!!!!! :lol: :lol:

Sometimes my English is so childish :slapface: , but anyway I was able to make you understand what I think. B)

But really, it isn't that difficult, because great minds think alike. ;)

Give yourself a break!

You write beautifully, always have! :)

Robert is impressive as far as range on the first two albums, but he still sounded like he was borrowing his phrasing from other blues artists. I feel he continued/continues to be more interesting as time went/goes on.

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Robert is impressive as far as range on the first two albums, but he still sounded like he was borrowing his phrasing from other blues artists. I feel he continued/continues to be more interesting as time went/goes on.

:yesnod: Zactly.

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His voice in '77 was awesome, better than '73 and '75 IMO.

That would fit the timeline behind the scenes. By 73 he'd developed nodes on his vocal cords and was pretty shredded. In 74 during the hiatus he had corrective surgery. If you listen to the unmixed tracks of songs like Trampled Underfoot, you can hear clearly he was in recovery. The 75 tour found him trying to get a handle on things, and he cracked A LOT. By 77 he'd found a new way of using it, and to great and powerful effect.

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That would fit the timeline behind the scenes. By 73 he'd developed nodes on his vocal cords and was pretty shredded. In 74 during the hiatus he had corrective surgery. If you listen to the unmixed tracks of songs like Trampled Underfoot, you can hear clearly he was in recovery. The 75 tour found him trying to get a handle on things, and he cracked A LOT. By 77 he'd found a new way of using it, and to great and powerful effect.

Yeap, the flu's and colds he was getting didn't help either, not to mention smoking. It is obvious to see that in the Seattle 17/7/77 Robert was sick. It just wasn't the norm for his voice to be THAT bad in '77. My favourite tour is '77 tbh.

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