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Someone explain to me (guitar related)...


nki

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Ok I've been a huge Jimmy Page fan for as long as I can remember but as far as my playing goes I've always played things a bit more safe and slow and in a nice comfy blues box (think Eric Clapton, not that I'm as good as him of course).

Now of course I love Jimmy Page's playing and there's some stuff that I'm not quite sure how he does it and I'm too lazy to figure it out (and I try not to use internet for learning stuff, I like my ears best).

To get to the point there's one particular lick, if we can call it like that, that I'm interested in. It's the flurry of notes he does, you can't really miss it since he seems to do it a lot, really classic Page. For example it's around 1:40 - 1:43 in Good Times Bad Times.

And the other one that is kind of similar.

At 5:20.

These two are just to serve you as an example since he seems to do variations of this in a lot of his stuff. It seems like it's playable all over the neck so if someone could explain to me the basic idea behind it I would be very grateful.

Thanks in advance.

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You're going to need to be more specific. The bit in Trampled doesn't appear in GTBT. Are you talking about the double stop bends that begin the GTBT solo, or the rockabilly lick? Check out the jam in Whole Lotta Love from The Song Remains the Same. Most of his signature licks are there, and you can see them up close. Sorry I couldn't be more helpful. I'll be happy to try if you can pin it down a bit more.

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The thing is I didn't have a particular thing in my mind, I was kind of looking more towards the fluidity of his playing which is a nice change from the usual call-response blues playing if that makes sense. I'll try to be to be more specific just not sure if it's going to be before I go to sleep (past midnight already here).

As far as GTBT goes one of the licks I had in mind is the first one that comes after the bass bit (only a short bass bit is played, no other instruments), the guitar lick sounds kind of scale based, descending type of stuff.

And yes I realize the bit from Trampled video does not appear in GTBT, what I wanted to know is how he does those runs of his.

Anyway more tomorrow I'm going to sleep now.

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  • 3 weeks later...
As far as GTBT goes one of the licks I had in mind is the first one that comes after the bass bit (only a short bass bit is played, no other instruments), the guitar lick sounds kind of scale based, descending type of stuff.

I Think the bit you mean is the beginning of 2nd solo...12 fret E minor pentatonic scale descending should do it. Can't remember if the blues note is played, think it is chromatically.

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  • 4 weeks later...
I Think the bit you mean is the beginning of 2nd solo...12 fret E minor pentatonic scale descending should do it. Can't remember if the blues note is played, think it is chromatically.

To my recollection, it is a pentatonic down scale with a chromatic slur at the end. :beer:

Hey Leddy! Long time mate! :wave:

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  • 3 months later...

I believe what he does is bend the 14th fret of the G string.....folloew by playing the 12th fret on both the B and E strings one after another, and upon reaching the high E notes descends the E minor pentatonic scale in triplet groups.

Ah yes, the ol' Chuck Berry lick.

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One thing you may want to try is find the notes in those "safe blues boxes" ascending on single strings(try to think of the scales in a linear fashion as well as horizontal), if nothing else it might get you out of the rut that playing nothing but pos.1 minor pentatonics will put you in. Of course I really advocate throwing all the scale patterns away and learn the circle of fifths, scale construction and where the notes are, if you know which notes to play and where they are you can play any scale anywhere on the neck, whereas if I ask one of my students(former students I should say, got too busy to teach a while back and haven't had the desire to do any of it lately either) who thinks he knows an e minor scale by learning a pattern to add a sharp and play in E dorian instead, he'll look at me and go "huh?", when it only involves replacing the "C" notes with "C#". It can be tedious to learn (I spent months saying out loud the notes I would play while practicing, and trust me, my students hated me for itbiggrin.gif ).

THAT is how you get that fluidity up and down the neck you are looking for(of course you can do it by stringing patterns in different positions together, but then you are limited to only playing the patterns you know).

As far as learning/improving your technique goes..you can't do better than learning from this guy:

Pebber Brown's youtube channel

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