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Guggenheim interview on CNN


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CNN just finished showing an interesting interview with Davis Guggenheim on Campbell Brown's show, with clips from the movie. It will probably be repeated, or it may be available on their web site. I'd have posted before, but I was too busy watching it! Sorry.

Most interesting comment to me was Guggenheim's view that U2 started as a band in opposition to Zeppelin and bands like them. Hmm.

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Most interesting comment to me was Guggenheim's view that U2 started as a band in opposition to Zeppelin and bands like them. Hmm.

Having seen the film in Toronto last September, I was a little put off by that kind of sentiment from The Edge, something about the 'overindulgence of the 70s' or something to that effect. I was at one of U2's shows in the 80s and Bono stopped the show to say 'stop screaming, we're not the Beatles.' Well, I would say they've become one of the most commercial bands ever. Define 'overindulgence.' And no, they're not the Beatles.

Edited by wholelottajimmy
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Having seen the film in Toronto last September, I was a little put off by that kind of sentiment from The Edge, something about the 'overindulgence of the 70s' or something to that effect. I was at one of U2's shows in the 80s and Bono stopped the show to say 'stop screaming, we're not the Beatles.' Well, I would say they've become one of the most commercial bands ever. Define 'overindulgence.' And no, they're not the Beatles.

I didn't see the film yet but my guess would be Edge was referring to the extended versions of songs and guitar solos lasting a long time - the whole sort of arena rock genre. But again, not hearing the whole of the conversation, I don't know for sure.

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That was one of the things I found interesting in the movie. I most certainly got the impression Edge was refering to Zep and others when he mentioned sefl indulgent solos that went on forever. And moving to the next generation Jack commented that he was rebelling against all of the electronically enhanced music (Edge lol!) As life is cyclic so too is music.

Even though each of these generations was moving away from the sounds of their previous generations there was clearly a lot of respect amongst all of them. I don't believe any harm was intended by the comments but they were ironic ; )

I see Davis is begining to let more information out of the bag as the movie is being publicly released. For a follow up see the Future of Jimmy Page thread where I posted an interview with Jimmy that was published yesterday. He talks more openly about some of the music in the movie and his future plans :rolleyes: But I do believe! I believe, I believe!

edited to fix the misuse of a word too embarrassingly funny to admit to ; )

Edited by Medhb
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I didn't see the film yet but my guess would be Edge was referring to the extended versions of songs and guitar solos lasting a long time - the whole sort of arena rock genre. But again, not hearing the whole of the conversation, I don't know for sure.

I agree with you. He was referring to the music. Maybe I'm oversensitve to that comment. I've just always felt U2 to be a little over the top in their own way. Anyway, I too have heard similar comments from other musicians.

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I agree with you. He was referring to the music. Maybe I'm oversensitve to that comment. I've just always felt U2 to be a little over the top in their own way. Anyway, I too have heard similar comments from other musicians.

They did get over the top at one point during the Zooropa and Pop era but Bono will be the first to admit that and by the next tour, they got back to basics as far as the whole presentation.

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They did get over the top at one point during the Zooropa and Pop era but Bono will be the first to admit that and by the next tour, they got back to basics as far as the whole presentation.

They do have some very fine music. I was certainly a big fan in the earlier days and probably lost interest around Zooropa so I'm not knowledgeable on what they did after that. Anyway, sounds like I'm really down on the band and in fact, that's not the case. That specifc comment resonated a bit with me given the different styles and techniques of each musician. I'd be interested to know what you and others think after seeing the film on that point. There was also a comment made by Jimmy about critic's reaction to the fourth album that stayed with me. Actually quite an insightful film, certainly a lot to talk about.

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They do have some very fine music. I was certainly a big fan in the earlier days and probably lost interest around Zooropa so I'm not knowledgeable on what they did after that. Anyway, sounds like I'm really down on the band and in fact, that's not the case. That specifc comment resonated a bit with me given the different styles and techniques of each musician. I'd be interested to know what you and others think after seeing the film on that point. There was also a comment made by Jimmy about critic's reaction to the fourth album that stayed with me. Actually quite an insightful film, certainly a lot to talk about.

I love Zooropa - in some ways one of my favorites, though I wasn't overly fond of the whole live presentation. I prefer when it's just them performing which is how it is now. I think it'll be interesting to hear each of them comment on things because they are coming from different backgrounds, points in history etc., and with U2, if they were reacting to the cliched term "dinosaur" rock, well they owe them a debt for being there to fuel their own creativity if you see what I'm saying. I'm looking forward to seeing it.

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I had heard this reference to U2 and Zep over the past week in another interview with Guggenheim. Found that interesting.

The Edge has always been pretentious in a Michael Stipe kind of way, but few realize it

because of the megalomanic singing next to him.

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The Edge has always been pretentious in a Michael Stipe kind of way, but few realize it

because of the megalomanic singing next to him.

Well, I remember him saying in about 1987 or so that "of all these bands, they (e.g. Led Zeppelin) really had something" - in reference to the heavy, "self-indulgent" bands of the 1970's. I'm pretty sure that was in Rolling Stone. My guess is that he was never interested in doing anything similar, but if it's good music, he will recognize that and say so (and for my part, for what it's worth, I'm not a U2 fan myself, but I thought War was a really interesting record at the time, and I thought Rattle and Hum was an excellent live album).

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Well, I remember him saying in about 1987 or so that "of all these bands, they (e.g. Led Zeppelin) really had something" - in reference to the heavy, "self-indulgent" bands of the 1970's. I'm pretty sure that was in Rolling Stone. My guess is that he was never interested in doing anything similar, but if it's good music, he will recognize that and say so (and for my part, for what it's worth, I'm not a U2 fan myself, but I thought War was a really interesting record at the time, and I thought Rattle and Hum was an excellent live album).

War is a great album. I forget the specifics of it but I believe it was Bill Flannigan's biography on the band where there are some favorable comments about Zep so they could be referring to a whole host of other bands. I do agree with you that what motivated them was an interest in going in a different direction.

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They all talked about the driving force that pushed them to fend for themselves, to carve out their own niche.

Jimmy stepped out of the "session" player, musak-maker role to forge a new sound from the crossroads of science/technology/market.

Edge went cross-cut from the intricate "prog-indulgence" of the late 70's to the simple punk ethos. All the while embracing the tech of the time, in the same way Jimmy did, even in rebellion to Zep.

Jack, in the same sense disses Edge as being too hi-tech and soul-less, by being tied to the technology. So he goes full circle to the street folk of what inspired the neighborhood music that Jimmy as a kid grew up with. With Jack it's ALL soul; technique be damned.

Of course there are holes and hypocrisy all throughout their collective philosophies, but these forces certainly served to propel each in his own right to succeed. Lucky us!

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War is a great album. I forget the specifics of it but I believe it was Bill Flannigan's biography on the band where there are some favorable comments about Zep so they could be referring to a whole host of other bands. I do agree with you that what motivated them was an interest in going in a different direction.

Nah, I'm actually sure it was an original interview in Rolling Stone, 1987 or possibly 1988. I used to read the mag regularly at a public library where I was working at the time.

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Nah, I'm actually sure it was an original interview in Rolling Stone, 1987 or possibly 1988. I used to read the mag regularly at a public library where I was working at the time.

Oh sorry - wasn't disputing where you saw the quote but I meant to say there was also commentary in Flannigan's book. My bad - still waking up :beer:

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I'm a fan of U2 and "City of Blinding Lights" is one of my favorite songs right now, but talk about arena rock. Aren't they currently on a big stadium tour in Europe? I know they're coming to Reliant Stadium here in Houston in the fall (which is a HUGE venue). My husband works in sales for a big crane company here and Reliant has hired them to build U2's stage for the concert. It will take five days using five of their largest cranes. That, to me, is over the top. But, then again, I like over the top. That's what I love about Zeppelin! Everything is bigger and better with them.

I'd like to see the Campbell Brown show. It sounds interesting. Hopefully, it will repeat over the weekend.

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I'm a fan of U2 and "City of Blinding Lights" is one of my favorite songs right now, but talk about arena rock. Aren't they currently on a big stadium tour in Europe? I know they're coming to Reliant Stadium here in Houston in the fall (which is a HUGE venue). My husband works in sales for a big crane company here and Reliant has hired them to build U2's stage for the concert. It will take five days using five of their largest cranes. That, to me, is over the top. But, then again, I like over the top. That's what I love about Zeppelin! Everything is bigger and better with them.

I'd like to see the Campbell Brown show. It sounds interesting. Hopefully, it will repeat over the weekend.

Well that was my point exactly in my first post where I described Bono stopping the show because fans were screaming. I mean, seriously. do you think he would do that now? There's something to be said about youth and idealism. How times have changed. So to criticize Zeppelin for their indulgences, musically or otherwise, is kind of silly and hypocritical.

By the way, I was reading an article from Rolling Stone on Michael Jackson, yes, do I dare mention MJ on this site. Nevertheless, this writer actually referred to 'the tacky vanities of Led Zeppelin." And it continues.

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By the way, I was reading an article from Rolling Stone on Michael Jackson, yes, do I dare mention MJ on this site. Nevertheless, this writer actually referred to 'the tacky vanities of Led Zeppelin." And it continues.

Vanities? There were four noses in Zeppelin and that's still less than Michael Jackson.

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Haven't seen the film yet ( :angry: roll on September), so I just wanted to point out that the opinion I mentioned in my first post was Guggenheim's, in the interview--I have yet to see how the Edge makes the point. From what you all are saying, anyway, the film sounds like a fascinating juxtaposition of players.

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Most interesting comment to me was Guggenheim's view that U2 started as a band in opposition to Zeppelin and bands like them. Hmm.

But did it mention how U2 have 'ended up'? :D

By the way U2's Larry Mullen (drummer) counts John Bohman as one of his main influences.

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They do have some very fine music. I was certainly a big fan in the earlier days and probably lost interest around Zooropa so I'm not knowledgeable on what they did after that. Anyway, sounds like I'm really down on the band and in fact, that's not the case. That specifc comment resonated a bit with me given the different styles and techniques of each musician. I'd be interested to know what you and others think after seeing the film on that point. There was also a comment made by Jimmy about critic's reaction to the fourth album that stayed with me. Actually quite an insightful film, certainly a lot to talk about.

I agree after that I really did not care. Its just Bono wanting to be in spot light. Edited by ADOC
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