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Most Moving Photograph You Have Ever Seen?


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For me, it's "Pale Blue Dot"

Before Hubble was sending back images from places billions of light years away that looked like abstract art at its finest form, there was this crappy quality digital picture from 1990. It was taken from the Voyager 1 spacecraft, which was released almost 32 years ago, is STILL functioning and still relaying details of the area beyond our solar system and is expected to run until at least 2025. Voyager 1 is and likely will be the most distant man-made object from Earth. Currently, Voyager 1 is 10.22 billion miles from earth (June 19th, 2009).

The photo is from Voyager 1 when it was about 3.7 billion miles away from Earth. On February 14th, 1990 Voyager 1 had completed its primary mission and was ordered to pivot around in order to take pictures of the planets. This was one of the pictures. The streaks are from the reflection of distant sunlight inside the camera. Earth is the small white-ish blue dot inside the orange ring. The name "Pale Blue Dot" came from Carl Sagan he also said:

---------------------------

"Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known."

It say a lot about what a few billion organisms on a tiny little rock can do. Sending a machine so far away. But if anything, for me, it only re-enforces our insignificance in the universe. I did a lot of thinking when I first saw this picture and it still influences me whenever I see it today.

pale-blue-dot-image1.jpg

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For me, it's "Pale Blue Dot"

Before Hubble was sending back images from places billions of light years away that looked like abstract art at its finest form, there was this crappy quality digital picture from 1990. It was taken from the Voyager 1 spacecraft, which was released almost 32 years ago, is STILL functioning and still relaying details of the area beyond our solar system and is expected to run until at least 2025. Voyager 1 is and likely will be the most distant man-made object from Earth. Currently, Voyager 1 is 10.22 billion miles from earth (June 19th, 2009).

The photo is from Voyager 1 when it was about 3.7 billion miles away from Earth. On February 14th, 1990 Voyager 1 had completed its primary mission and was ordered to pivot around in order to take pictures of the planets. This was one of the pictures. The streaks are from the reflection of distant sunlight inside the camera. Earth is the small white-ish blue dot inside the orange ring. The name "Pale Blue Dot" came from Carl Sagan he also said:

---------------------------

"Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known."

It say a lot about what a few billion organisms on a tiny little rock can do. Sending a machine so far away. But if anything, for me, it only re-enforces our insignificance in the universe. I did a lot of thinking when I first saw this picture and it still influences me whenever I see it today.

pale-blue-dot-image1.jpg

Truly does make you (and the earth) feel very, very small and insignificant when you think about the fact's of Voyager and it's capabilities! She is going to the Kuipar belt and should make it to the edge of our solar system before running out of steam.

I found this about Voyager .....

If Voyager 1 (launched from earth in 1977) were traveling in the direction of the nearest star, it would arrive in about 75,000 years.

When we figure out how to travel at light speed (witch I'm sure we will) in the next couple 100 years or so we will be there before Voyager make's it to much farther out of our solar system! But by then she will have surely depleted her power source, small nuclear reactor.

There's been lot's of visual image's that have caught my eye(s), most are of beautiful women. Now, before you get all huffy, I want to say that I respect women to the highest degree!!! But I like them so much that there appearance alone is often enough to move me.

I'm a hopeless romantic .... I can't help it!

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oklahoma-city-bombing-1.jpg

"Grown-ups, you know, they deserve a lot of the stuff they get. But why the children? What did the children ever do to anybody?"

It's twisted logic, but I think McVeighs reasoning was the same for what they did to the children in Waco.

One of the most moving for me still:

mn_rosenthal105.jpg

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  • 6 months later...

These photos from space are stunning. As I sit here looking at them I am reminded that there was a time when people thought the earth was flat. There are a number of photos that are essential for me, photos that stopped me in my tracks when I first saw them and still do today, however many years later. This first one was a National Geographic cover in 1985 and is a young afghan girl. Years later they did another shot of her, much older. This photo captures her eyes in stunning detail. When I look at this photo, or photos like this, it really makes the senselessness of war so much more clear.

national_geographic_magazine_cover_girl_Sharbat_Gula_1985.jpg

BonzoLikeDrummer posted this:

There's been lot's of visual image's that have caught my eye(s), most are of beautiful women. Now, before you get all huffy, I want to say that I respect women to the highest degree!!! But I like them so much that there appearance alone is often enough to move me. I'm a hopeless romantic .... I can't help it!

And I have to say I agree w/ him 100%. Of all the women I have seen the most stunning is Grace Kelly. She was before my time and she still leaves me in awe every time I see her. She was a model/actress and starred in some pivotal movies, including three Alfred Hitchcock classics. All accounts are that she was a truly sweet person as well. I chose an image that was small enough to fit in here... just to give you a glimpse at a true Goddess.

gracekelly.jpeg

Another subject that never ceases to amaze me are the great Pyramids Of Giza. To think that these were constructed what... 5000 years ago??? I've seen History Channel shows about these pyramids that detail how they line up w/ certain stars and the complexity of it all is mind-blowing. Here they are in all their beauty and power...

pyramids-of-giza-at-sunset-smithsonian.jpg

And lastly, another subject that always leaves me breathless is the planet Saturn. This image was was a composite of 45 photos taken by Cassini as it moved above the planet on the dark side. Absolutely amazing...

saturn110.jpg

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  • 4 years later...

These photos from space are stunning. As I sit here looking at them I am reminded that there was a time when people thought the earth was flat. There are a number of photos that are essential for me, photos that stopped me in my tracks when I first saw them and still do today, however many years later. This first one was a National Geographic cover in 1985 and is a young afghan girl. Years later they did another shot of her, much older. This photo captures her eyes in stunning detail. When I look at this photo, or photos like this, it really makes the senselessness of war so much more clear.national_geographic_magazine_cover_girl_BonzoLikeDrummer posted this: And I have to say I agree w/ him 100%. Of all the women I have seen the most stunning is Grace Kelly. She was before my time and she still leaves me in awe every time I see her. She was a model/actress and starred in some pivotal movies, including three Alfred Hitchcock classics. All accounts are that she was a truly sweet person as well. I chose an image that was small enough to fit in here... just to give you a glimpse at a true Goddess.gracekelly.jpegAnother subject that never ceases to amaze me are the great Pyramids Of Giza. To think that these were constructed what... 5000 years ago??? I've seen History Channel shows about these pyramids that detail how they line up w/ certain stars and the complexity of it all is mind-blowing. Here they are in all their beauty and power...pyramids-of-giza-at-sunset-smithsonian.jAnd lastly, another subject that always leaves me breathless is the planet Saturn. This image was was a composite of 45 photos taken by Cassini as it moved above the planet on the dark side. Absolutely amazing...saturn110.jpg

Great post. Like you, the photo of the Afghan girl left me speechless the first time I saw it. Grace Kelly was absolutely stunning.

Edited by Pagefan55
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This picture is something which has stuck with me for life and shaped my views of the individual vs state, and is one of the reasons why I don't support the military state, and one of many reasons why I believe that America, England, Canada, and Australia have no business getting involved in nation building projects.

nu.jpg

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This one is personal.

A dear friend of mine and his very loved dog Gizmo.

Gizmo had serious health issues and this was knowingly, their last night they spent together :(

The gut wrenching look, as this heartbroken man gazes into his dearly loved dog's eyes.

It breaks my heart! Just look at their eyes! Oh God, it kills me : :'( :

10550998_10153005522578852_8111587666518

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  • 3 years later...
On 8/22/2009 at 7:13 PM, zosodude13 said:

For me, it's "Pale Blue Dot"

 

Before Hubble was sending back images from places billions of light years away that looked like abstract art at its finest form, there was this crappy quality digital picture from 1990. It was taken from the Voyager 1 spacecraft, which was released almost 32 years ago, is STILL functioning and still relaying details of the area beyond our solar system and is expected to run until at least 2025. Voyager 1 is and likely will be the most distant man-made object from Earth. Currently, Voyager 1 is 10.22 billion miles from earth (June 19th, 2009).

 

 

The photo is from Voyager 1 when it was about 3.7 billion miles away from Earth. On February 14th, 1990 Voyager 1 had completed its primary mission and was ordered to pivot around in order to take pictures of the planets. This was one of the pictures. The streaks are from the reflection of distant sunlight inside the camera. Earth is the small white-ish blue dot inside the orange ring. The name "Pale Blue Dot" came from Carl Sagan he also said:

 

---------------------------

 

"Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

 

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

 

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

 

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

 

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known."

 

 

 

 

It say a lot about what a few billion organisms on a tiny little rock can do. Sending a machine so far away. But if anything, for me, it only re-enforces our insignificance in the universe. I did a lot of thinking when I first saw this picture and it still influences me whenever I see it today.

 

pale-blue-dot-image1.jpg

Wow. I've never seen that photograph before. Quite moving... Thanks for posting. :)

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A picture taken of the sky during lightning when I was 6 years old in 1st grade.  A girl brought it in to show a nun.  I think her parent or grand parent took the photo.  In the midst of the lightning and storm was a very distinct view of the face of Jesus how we have him appearing in many pictures.  It was something I will never forget.Non believers will say its a "trick of the light".  Their opinion, not mine

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