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The Pagemeister

10 Revealing Jimmy Page Quotes

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10 Revealing Jimmy Page Quotes

by Ellen Barnes

http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Lifestyle/Features/Revealing-Jimmy-Page-504/

Jimmy Page has never been one to talk. At least not to journalists. It’s been 40 years since Led Zeppelin mania first broke, and the interviews that Page has granted since then have been few and far between.

As Page himself has said, “I can communicate far better on a guitar than I can through my mouth.” When Zeppelin called it quits in 1980 after the death of drummer John Bonham, Page became especially reticent to talk to the press, purposefully dodging talk of a Zeppelin reunion — an enduring and international obsession of classic rock fans.

But when a reporter can, in the right moment, coax Page into reflecting back on Zeppelin or his work as a guitarist, it’s worth a listen. Here are 10 especially revealing Jimmy Page quotes.

On Led Zeppelin’s early tours, told to The Times in 2010: “The tours took a lot ... well, did it take a lot out of me? I don’t know whether it did. It gave as much to me as it took out. It was like being on a permanent adrenalin drip, do you know what I mean? [Playing live was] to be right on the edge of the moment.”

On Zeppelin’s enduring popularity: “We went in and recorded exactly where we were at that point in time. I think because of the quality of musicianship of the band has given it the longevity. I thought the music would endure, I didn’t think I would ... I always thought I’d be dead by 30, then dead by 40 and on and on. Now I’m 55 so I didn't even die at 50.”

On his identity as a guitarist, told to Guitar World in 1993: “Many people think of me as just a riff guitarist, but I think of myself in broader terms. As a musician I think my greatest achievement has been to create unexpected melodies and harmonies within a rock and roll framework. And as a producer I would like to be remembered as someone

who was able to sustain a band of unquestionable individual talent, and push it

to the forefront during its working career. I think I really captured the best

of our output, growth, change and maturity on tape — the multifaceted gem that

is Led Zeppelin.”

On his Gibson EDS-1275 Double Neck, told to Crawdaddy Magazine in 1975: “The other night we played in the Philadelphia Spectrum, which really is a black hole as a concert Hall … The security there is the most ugly of anywhere in the States. I saw

this incident happen and I was almost physically sick. In fact, if I hadn't been playing the guitar I was playing it would've been over somebody's head. It was a double-neck, which is irreplaceable, really, unless you wait another nine months for them to make another one at Gibson.”

On the power of music, told to The Scotsman in 2010: “If I ever really felt depressed, I would just start putting on all my old records that I played as a kid, because the whole thing that really lifted me then still lifted me during those other times. It was good medicine for me, and it still does that for me when I put something on. Isn’t it wonderful that we’ve got all that good medicine? I think it’s got to be all part of our DNA, this mass communication through music. That’s what it is. It’s got to be, hasn’t it? Music is the one thing that has been consistently there for me. It hasn’t let me down.”

On the legacy of Zeppelin drummer John Bonham: “Almost the moment he died, they put him in Playboy as one of the greatest drummers, which he was — there’s no doubt about it. There’s never been anybody since. He’s one of the greatest drummers that ever lived.”

On his first guitar and his Black Beauty, told to Guitar Player magazine in 1977: “[i got my first guitar] When I was 14. It was all a matter of trying to pick up tips and stuff. There weren’t many method books, really apart from jazz, which had no bearing on rock whatsoever at the time. But the first guitar was a Grazzioso, which was a copy of a Stratocaster; then I got a real Stratocaster; then those Gibson Black Beauties which stayed with me for a long time until some thieving magpie took it to his nest. That’s the guitar I did all the ’60s sessions on. I was one of the first people in England to have [a Gibson “Black Beauty” Les Paul Custom], but I didn’t know that then. I just saw it on the wall, had a go with it, and it was good. I traded a Gretsch Chet Atkins I’d had before for the Les Paul.”

On growing as a guitarist, told to music journalist Steven Rosen in 1986: “There’s so much that can be done on the guitar. I’ve only done a few bits and pieces, really, considering what can be done. Alright, let’s go from one extreme to the other. The gut-strung guitar, the classical guitar, that is a whole different world on its own. And we’re talking to guitar players here so they know that. It’s really fine within its horizons. And then you get into the steel-strung acoustic guitar and the electric guitars as such. When you think what the guitar can do and what every individual player does with a guitar, everyone has their own identity coming through the guitar. And then to talk about exploration and what I’ve done, there’s so much that can be done on the guitar. And that’s what is so good about the guitar — everyone can really enjoy themselves on it and have a good time, which is what it’s all about. Right?”

On the documentary It Might Get Loud, told to red carpet reporter in 2009: “There were lots of things that shouldn’t have been in [it Might Get Loud] that were. But that’s it; it’s a documentary. You open your heart up to this sort of thing. You lay there naked, hoping to be clothed.”

On playing with Led Zeppelin again, told to BBC News in 2007: “It was so exhilarating to play together. We actually got together in a clandestine rehearsal situation with Robert and Jason Bonham, John Paul Jones and myself. The hardest thing really, having anything to do with Led Zeppelin was getting together and rehearsing without anybody finding out about it. We went in there with such a will that everyone wanted it to succeed on the playing level that it did. It was dynamite.”

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I had never heard Jimmy say anything about losing his Black Beauty before reading that quote. I'm quite suprised that the worst thing Jimmy called the culprit was a "thieving magpie," and didn't use a slew of four letter words.

To whoever stole Jimmy's Black Beauty, you should be ashamed of yourself.

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On the power of music, told to The Scotsman in 2010: “If I ever really felt depressed, I would just start putting on all my old records that I played as a kid, because the whole thing that really lifted me then still lifted me during those other times. It was good medicine for me, and it still does that for me when I put something on. Isn’t it wonderful that we’ve got all that good medicine? I think it’s got to be all part of our DNA, this mass communication through music. That’s what it is. It’s got to be, hasn’t it? Music is the one thing that has been consistently there for me. It hasn’t let me down.”

Thanks, I was looking for that quote a few months ago for Pageist. I haven't seen him around lately...

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To whoever stole Jimmy's Black Beauty, you should be ashamed of yourself.

I can only imagine the value that thing has, most likely more sentimental for obvious reasons. Perhaps Jimmy is still hopeful she'll turn up one day.

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On the power of music, told to The Scotsman in 2010: "If I ever really felt depressed, I would just start putting on all my old records that I played as a kid, because the whole thing that really lifted me then still lifted me during those other times. It was good medicine for me, and it still does that for me when I put something on. Isn't it wonderful that we've got all that good medicine? I think it's got to be all part of our DNA, this mass communication through music. That's what it is. It's got to be, hasn't it? Music is the one thing that has been consistently there for me. It hasn't let me down."

Thanks, I was looking for that quote a few months ago for Pageist. I haven't seen him around lately...

More likely than not he's busy with schoolwork or something.

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More likely than not he's busy with schoolwork or something.

Yes it is a busy time of year.

Has anyone else noticed a lot of Page-related activity on gibson.com lately? I wonder if it means something.

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On Led Zeppelins early tours, told to The Times in 2010: The tours took a lot ... well, did it take a lot out of me? I dont know whether it did. It gave as much to me as it took out. It was like being on a permanent adrenalin drip, do you know what I mean? [Playing live was] to be right on the edge of the moment.

On Zeppelins enduring popularity: We went in and recorded exactly where we were at that point in time. I think because of the quality of musicianship of the band has given it the longevity. I thought the music would endure, I didnt think I would ... I always thought Id be dead by 30, then dead by 40 and on and on. Now Im 55 so I didn't even die at 50.

This interview must be from 1999 if he's claiming to be 55. Unless he's joking about his age. He's 66yrs old - born in 1944.

Edited by hf21

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On the documentary It Might Get Loud, told to red carpet reporter in 2009: "There were lots of things that shouldn't have been in [it Might Get Loud] that were. But that's it; it's a documentary. You open your heart up to this sort of thing. You lay there naked, hoping to be clothed."

I like this one the most -- there's a lot of truth in it. Documentaries are supposed to be raw, nervy and unfiltered. If they weren't, they'd be movies.

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Not long ago I picked up a copy of a paperback collection of articles culled from the pages of the aforementioned Crawdaddy called The Seventies. I can't say I ever read an original copy of the magazine, but I found the articles in this collection fascinating. One in particular was an interview with Jimmy Page by none other than William Burroughs who was commissioned by the magazine to check out a Zeppelin concert in advance of the interview and give his thoughts so to speak. Fascinating meeting of the minds. Well worth checking out of you get the chance.

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Not long ago I picked up a copy of a paperback collection of articles culled from the pages of the aforementioned Crawdaddy called The Seventies. I can't say I ever read an original copy of the magazine, but I found the articles in this collection fascinating. One in particular was an interview with Jimmy Page by none other than William Burroughs who was commissioned by the magazine to check out a Zeppelin concert in advance of the interview and give his thoughts so to speak. Fascinating meeting of the minds. Well worth checking out of you get the chance.

Slight correction--the book is called Very Seventies. Anyway--good news kids--I was able to track down a copy of the interview online if you would like to give it a read. You can find it in its entirety here:

http://www.clubconspiracy.com/forum/f11/william-burroughs-jimmy-page-chat-jimmy-600.html

Boy that Bill Burroughs is a piece of work. If that IS his real name. I particularly like the bit that mentions George Sanders and a "Chicken Swindle" that occured at the Crowley home. Always liked George--Grew up watching The Saint movies. Bitter parting words to be sure.

Enjoy, kids. Hope it gives you a bit of diversion!

Cheers,

Chap

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