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kiss of fire

Singing With a American Accent

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Awwww you mean it's not right to sing in a Liverpuldlian Scouse accent? Jamie Carragher could never be a rock star then???? :unsure:

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So..they must be talking about Bostonian accents then,

This is because singing in a local accent would sound funny and because American rounding off of words makes it easier to sing them.

Mr Gibson said, "There were huge differences between the sung and the spoken pronunciation of the same words.

"Consider the difference between 'I' (spoken) and 'ah' (sung), 'girl', pronounced without the 'r' in speech and with the 'r' in singing, and 'thought' with rounded lips in speech versus 'thart' with unrounded lips in singing.

"Studies in the past have suggested that non-American singers wilfully put on American accents but my research suggests the opposite – that an American-influenced accent is the default when singing pop."

Putting in "r's" where they aren't and visa-versa ala,

"I saw'r Jonesy pahk the cah !" said Robert. :D

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This topic makes me think of Mick jagger, perhaps the first Englishman to sing with a totally U.S. accent :):)

It's funny you should say that, in the Daily Mail Online the article was posted there also with their comments included in it and they used Mick as an example. :D

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1299749/They-just-cayant-help-How-Wino-Jagger-sing-U-S-accent-natural-way-carry-tune.html

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I would be interested to know which part of the US Mick jagger's accent comes from.

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"I saw'r Jonesy pahk the cah !" said Robert. :D

My brother lived in Rhode Island for about a year (when the Boston Strangler was on the loose), and when he came home he had acquired that accent....

'C'mon, let's play some cahds!!'

:lol:

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Hi all,

name='Oracle' timestamp='1280848540' post='472971']

So..they must be talking about Bostonian accents then,

This is because singing in a local accent would sound funny and because American rounding off of words makes it easier to sing them.

Poppycock! :P

It's a Boston accent.Long 'a',also replace the 'o' with a,or ah,. A Bostonian is one who lives in Boston.

Go to Iowa,hard R!!! :)

Hope this helps.

KB(nominal )

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This topic makes me think of Mick jagger, perhaps the first Englishman to sing with a totally U.S. accent :):)

QFE!

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My brother lived in Rhode Island for about a year (when the Boston Strangler was on the loose), and when he came home he had acquired that accent....

'C'mon, let's play some cahds!!'

:lol:

I lived in Texas for a couple of years in the 80's and although I didn't realize it, I picked up the accent.

"I'm fixin' to ya'all!"

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I would be interested to know which part of the US Mick jagger's accent comes from.

Fargo. :3stooges:

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Paul Rodgers originally used an american accent to sound like the blues artists he was influenced by/loved. I thought he was american as a young bad company fan.

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Well, Ian Anderson stubbornly managed to retain a lot of his English accent with Jethro Dull. Maybe that's why they were such a nauseating band.

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Paul Rodgers originally used an american accent to sound like the blues artists he was influenced by/loved. I thought he was american as a young bad company fan.

"I CAIN'T get enough of your love..." Love that song still!

It's nice to hear someone sing in their natural English accent too, such as David Gilmour, Syd Barrett, Ray Davies and Morrissey.

What about Americans singing with English accents?! I can only think of Green Day, who are from California, singing in a kind of quasi-Cockney on their early records. And Spinal Tap, of course.

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