Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Sign in to follow this  
SteveAJones

Robert Plant - Band of Joy (ALBUM REVIEWS)

Recommended Posts

CD REVIEWS

You'll Dig The Latest Plant

by Dan Aquilante

New York Post / September 14, 2010

ROBERT PLANT "Band of Joy"

****

STILL on a musical high from winning five Grammys for 2007's "Raising Sand" with Alison Krauss, rock hero Robert Plant returns with another dose of Americana. It's a compelling mix of traditional and cover songs that opens with a throbbing take on Los Lobos' "Angel Dance," and works its way through a country-gospel "Falling in Love Again" and a stark cover of the old spiritual "Satan, Your Kingdom Must Come Down."

Great Nashville session players in Plant's band include guitarist Buddy Miller, and Patti Griffin supplies harmonies this time. But it's not just "Raising Sand" Vol. 2. "Band of Joy," named for Plant's pre-Led Zeppelin band, has a darker edge, where regular string instruments are made to sound exotic and even mysterious, as they do on "Angel Dance." Other fine tunes include Richard Thompson's "House of Cards," and Townes Van Zandt's "Harm's Swift Way," a lament transformed into a two-step that just happens to be about dying.

http://www.nypost.co...TC-rss=

Edited by SteveAJones

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Globe and Mail here in Canada gave it 4 stars.

The Globe and Mail

September 14, 2010

Band of Joy

Robert Plant (Rounder)

4 STARS

At first glance, this may seem just another adventure in Americana, with a different band building on the foundation of Plant’s 2009 Grammy-winning Raising Sand. Spend some time with it, however, and it’s the differences that stand out – the sly, hypnotic grooves, the churchy harmonies and the wicked subtlety of Plant’s singing. The production (by Plant and Nashville guitarist Buddy Miller) oozes atmosphere while avoiding the obvious, so even though Angel Dance is awash in swampy guitar tremolo, it’s the plinking mandolin that drives the rhythm, just as the funky drums shape Plant’s phrasing in the otherwise folky Even This Shall Pass Away. Simply stunning. J.D. Considine

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/arts/music/a-fearsome-blues-rock-assault/article1706789/?cmpid=rss1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Listening Room: Easy to have a whole lotta love for Robert Plant's new album

Published: Sunday, September 12, 2010

By GARY GRAFF

The Oakland Press

AMERICANA

Robert Plant

"Band of Joy"

Rounder

★★★ 1/2

Despite all of Led Zeppelin's ground-breaking success, it took a most unusual creative turn pairing with Alison Krauss on 2007's "Raising Sand" to vault singer Robert Plant to Grammy Award-winning status. The expected move, of course, would have been a sequel, but Plant has never been one to do what's expected. So after initial attempts at a followup with Krauss were abandoned, he quickly teamed with Buddy Miller, the Nashville jack-of-all-trades auteur who played guitar in the "Raising Sand" tour band, and created a new project that took the name of the band Plant (and drummer John Bonham) played in prior to Zep's formation. The result is an interpretive masterpiece of, interestingly, American folk, blues, rock and even soul songs done up with an edgy kind of ambience and delivered by a crack group of players that includes Patty Griffin as Plant's vocal foil this time around. The repertoire is fascinatingly diverse, from the trancey flow of Los Lobos' "Angel Dance" to a pair of songs "Silver Rider" and "Monkey" by the Minnesota trio Low, a twangy doo-wop version of the Kelly Brothers' "I'm Falling in Love Again" and a Dylanized rendition of Townes Van Zant's "Harm's Swift Way." Plant and company set the mid-19th century poem "Even This Shall Pass Away" to a spare, psychedelic-tinged groove while lending a spiritual feel to Richard Thompson's "House of Cards," and the Plant-Miller original "Central Two-0-Nine" has the kind of chugging train rhythm that the late Johnny Cash would be proud of. It's a long way from "Stairway to Heaven," but it's easy to have a whole lotta love for this latest entry in Plant's eclectic and idiosyncratic solo catalog.

http://theoaklandpre...66242641179.txt

Edited by SteveAJones

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Album review: Robert Plant's 'Band of Joy'

Randy Lewis (Los Angeles Times)

September 14, 2010

The natural and the supernatural have long co-mingled in the world Robert Plant inhabits, as far back as his days fronting Led Zeppelin on through his bar-raising 2007 collaboration with Alison Krauss, "Raising Sand." So it comes as no surprise that those forces are also central to his new project, produced by Americana heavyweight Buddy Miller and recorded in Nashville.

As veteran Plant followers would expect, there's little here in common with the bulk of what's coming out of Music City these days. He's far more interested in the ancient roots of country and folk music, a haunted place where broken hearts rarely heal and where restless spirits find little peace.

Miller has provided Plant with a musical framework as deep as it is wide, not far afield from that which T Bone Burnett built for "Raising Sand." Now that Krauss has returned to her longtime band Union Station, Plant calls on singer-songwriter Patty Griffin as his duet partner for seven of the 12 tracks, and she matches his yearning, questing vocals gorgeously.

It's elemental stuff, emotionally and musically, that fascinates Plant whether it's the savage electric folk-blues treatment of Los Lobos' "Angel Dance," the raucous Bo Diddley proto-rock approach for Texas R&B musician Barbara Lynn's "You Can't Buy My Love" or the achingly beautiful grand-scale balladry of Low's "Silver Rider." He's also concerned more with quiet revelations than top-of-the-lungs proclamations, which may disappoint those only interested in hearing his Zeppelin roar one more time.

"Band of Joy," which revives the name of the band Plant was in before Zeppelin erupted from the earth's molten core, feels more rooted to the earth than the consistently transcendent "Raising Sand," but the singer effectively keeps a foot planted in each of those worlds.

http://latimesblogs....and-of-joy.html

Edited by SteveAJones

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Source:- The Montreal Gazette

Robert Plant

Band of Joy Es Paranza/ Rounder

Rating 4.5 out of 5

As he closes another recorded chapter in one of rock's most impressive third-act journeys, Robert Plant is clearly having a whale of a time. On the last track of his superb new disc, Band of Joy, the former Led Zeppelin vocalist wails on top of a drum-dominated stomper: "Fame is but a slow decay/ Even this shall pass away," he sings.

The line is significant. An awareness of rock 'n' roll glory's fickle nature pretty much defines the secret of Plant's late-career successes. He has resolutely taken a pass on seemingly sure bets like a Zeppelin reunion and a sequel to his platinum, multi-Grammy-winning collaboration with Alison Krauss, Raising Sand, preferring to skip the easy money and explore territory that tickles his artistic fancy.

The new album reveals its treasures at a leisurely pace. At first, it seems to lack the disarming force of Mighty Rearranger, released in 2005, and the shocking beauty of Raising Sand, issued two years later. But as the ear becomes acclimated to Plant's new ensemble -related, in name only, to his psychedelic pre-Zep group -stirring its pot of backbeat-driven roots, traditional folk blues and dark, menacing rockers, the level of artistry here becomes dramatically apparent.

The guitar work of Plant's right-hand-man and co-producer, Buddy Miller, serves as a sort of anchor to the album's sound. Whether it's bright and chiming, as on the gorgeous, inscrutable Townes Van Zandt composition Harm's Swift Way or barely repressing rage, as on the inspired covers of Silver Rider and Monkey by Minnesota slowcore trio Low, Miller's instrument is a key element. As the disc unfolds, mandolin, banjo and pedal steel play off Miller while Patty Griffin occasionally sweetens the vocal mix.

As latter-day Plant albums have led us to expect, his voice is in fighting trim, even when settled most of the time at a lower register. His interpretive powers are also on full display, as he digs happily into the typically stirring melody and incongruously bleak lyrics of Richard Thompson's House of Cards.

"The birds are wheeling/ Up above your head/ Ah, your days are numbered/ You're as good as dead," Plant sings in Thompson's song. But Band of Joy suggests that Plant, even at 62, is nowhere near done.

Podworthy: Falling In Love Again

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/entertainment/Robert+Plant+Band+Treasures+slowly+revealed/3531873/story.html#ixzz0zjLPho2E

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plant taps into teenage attitude

By JANE STEVENSON, QMI Agency

Last Updated: September 16, 2010 3:52pm

Robert Plant On his latest album, Band of Joy, singer Robert Plant continues his exploration of Americana music covers that began with bluegrass artist Alison Krauss on the multiple-Grammy winning 2007 disc, Raising Sand.

And yes, that new album's title is also the name of the Birmingham group that Plant and drummer John Bonham played in before they joined Led Zeppelin.

"It has to do with attitude," said Plant, 62, holding court in a Toronto hotel room on Thursday morning.

"I mean once upon a time, I was 17, in the Band of Joy, precocious, adamant, triumphant, unloved, but driven like a steam train and with a kind of determination and nonchalance that almost didn't make sense because the fact was that nobody liked it. But I loved it and I believed in it and of course everybody had to jump ship 'cause we were starting to get very hungry.

"But I just figured that everything that got me into my world was basically developed on the premise and on the projection of me as a member of the Band of Joy. I was on fire. I made myself flammable. And it was that, that got me the hitch and the foot up into the whole world of music."

Plant, dressed casually but stylishly in beige loafers (no socks), tight dark-wash jeans, a navy T-shirt and with his long, curly blond mane tied back in a messy ponytail, looks like he just stepped off the plane from one of the travels he's famous for taking.

"I have to take the mountain to Mohammad," he explains of his creative process. "I have to go on a soul searching mission for music in a certain way. So today is Thursday -- in 10 days time, I shall be on the southern-most shores of the Atlantic, at the very tip of Morocco, getting my recompense for this. I'll go out and stand out and see the raging sea come in and all behind me will be vast expanses of desert. It's not expensive to do that, it's just I know how I have to exist to make me into the guy in the Band of Joy."

Plant and Krauss actually attempted to make a follow-up record with producer T-Bone Burnett but the results were lacking. They even got together with Canadian producer Daniel Lanois at one point.

"He had a bottle of Jameson's and several cases of Tecate, and he and I and Alison met and talked about the meaning of life and it appeared that we could do something. And I'm sure one day we will 'cause Dan is probably one of the most spectacular and important guys in contemporary music 'cause he's wild, he's crazy, he's wonderful. His imagination and his capacity to come up with an idea in a split second actually turns the day inside out. It was a wonderful time. I spent three days with him. We wrote five songs."

Eventually Plant ended up with noted Nashville guitarist-producer Buddy Miller, who played in the Raising Sand Band Revue, and Patty Griffin became Plant's new female duet partner after Krauss decided to go back to her day job with Union Station.

"Buddy's a man for every single turn, and shape, and angle of great music," said Plant, whose tour with Band of Joy is expected to have dates in Canada beginning in Toronto on Jan. 18.

"His taste and his fountain of knowledge is immeasurable. I've never known anybody so profound and with such a great charm and superb discretion. Whenever I get a little bit, (starts singing), 'Hey, Mama, Mama', He sort of looks at me and frowns a little bit. And I go, 'Oh, yeah, I know what you mean.' So I rein back in the demon -- the little tiny bits of that other guy occasionally surfaces -- and I go, 'Oooooh.'

"Whatever it is, it's a part of my personality. I've got an exaggerated personality I suppose. Let's face it. If that's all I've come out with that's a bit dodgy, that's not bad really. I was immune to penicillin for years."

Plant eyes fancy tape recorder

So I sit down to talk to Robert Plant at a Toronto hotel on Thursday morning and he immediately eyes my Sony cassette tape recorder and demands to know where he can buy one.

"You can't get those in England," says the one-time lead singer of Led Zeppelin.

Plant immediately orders a record company employee to go out and find one before he gets on a plane.

"Let's get analogue!" he commands. "That's how you'll help me make a new album of all original songs."

He explains further: "I bought a whole beautiful digital set-up that you could chuck into half a shoebox, but I don't like the way digital stacks memory. Admittedly now, I'm hardly writing music, I'm just performing now a lot, but when I was writing, my more recent solo stuff, I've had to record vocal ideas against backing tracks using digital stuff. I don't care (about the quality of analogue) because it's not the finished article anyway."

jane.stevenson@sunmedia.ca

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There he is, keeping us well informed. Many thanks...xo

Makes a great birthday treat to myself....maybe I'll pick up some MOJO in vinyl while I'm at it!!

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There he is, keeping us well informed. Many thanks...xo

Makes a great birthday treat to myself....maybe I'll pick up some MOJO in vinyl while I'm at it!!

:)

Happy Birthday to you, Planted!

Hope you are having a great day listening to BOJ!

:birthday:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pop Top: Robert Plant brings a ‘Band of Joy’

Salt Lake Tribune

Published Sep 20, 2010

CD • “Band of Joy” is the follow-up to singer Robert Plant’s 2007 album “Raising Sand,” which won multiple Grammys but happened to be one of the most boring albums produced that year. Fortunately, “Band of Joy” is a slightly livelier affair, aided by some of the most under-appreciated musicians in Nashville, including Buddy Miller, Patti Griffin and Darrell Scott. The album has the same murky, atmospheric production that “Raising Sand” drowned in, but the songs are more provocative, allowing Plant’s voice to be expansive and flexible.David Burger

http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/entertainment/50292444-81/joy-plant-band-album.html.csp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CD review: Robert Plant, 'Band of Joy'

Aidin Vaziri

San Francisco Chronicle

Sunday, September 19, 2010

Rock

Why has Robert Plant chosen this precise moment to revive his short-lived experimental blues outfit from the tail end of the '60s, Band of Joy? Why not? The former Led Zeppelin front man thrives on defying expectations. So the follow-up to his Grammy-winning collaboration with Alison Krauss, "Raising Sand," once again finds him working with a dream team of American roots musicians, including singer Patty Griffin, guitarist and co-producer Buddy Miller, multi-instrumentalist Darrell Scott, bassist Byron House and drummer Marco Giovino. Together they take on a series of unexpected covers, such as Los Lobos' 20-year-old "Angel Dance" and the Townes Van Zandt rarity "Harms Swift Way," along with several traditional tunes, including "Satan, Your Kingdom Must Come Down" and the Appalachian folk ditty "Cindy, I'll Marry You Someday." The album has a distinct rockabilly feel, making it slightly livelier than its predecessor. But it's on the hushed ballads that Plant's leathery voice really captivates, particularly "Silver Rider" and "Monkey," smoldering ballads by the little-known Minnesota indie rock band Low. As a follow-up to the blockbuster "Raising Sand" it makes perfect sense. But as an alternative to a cash-grabbing Zeppelin nostalgia tour, it's really the only way to go.

ROBERT PLANT

BAND OF JOY

ROUNDER

$18.98

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3x8r.jpg

BBC Review

"An album of bounding energy and unexpected eclecticism."

Colin Irwin 2010-09-09

http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/reviews/3x8r

Having won enough awards to keep his mantelpiece groaning for years for his 2007 collaboration with Alison Krauss, Robert Plant resists the temptation to repeat the Americana formula and give us Raising More Sand. Instead he invokes the name of Band of Joy, the psychedelic blues group he originally fronted before the birth of Led Zeppelin over four decades’ earlier, for an album of bounding energy and unexpected eclecticism.

Produced with formidable intensity and an impressive sonic feel by Nashville-based country stalwart Buddy Miller, it offers yet another indication of Plant’s commendably enduring desire to keep moving. Clearly neither advancing age nor years of unabated success have deprived Plant of either his constant appetite for challenge or his ability to deliver in a cogent, credible and thoroughly convincing fashion. Whether wailing yearningly over a buoyant acoustic rhythm on the Lightnin’ Hopkins blues Central Two-O-Nine or rockin’n’rollin’ in time-honoured fashion on You Can’t Buy My Love, Plant is in terrific voice throughout. Pounding drums (from Marco Giovino) are pushed to the front of the mix and steel guitar and banjos abound on an album with country roots but which quickly develops tentacles that spread in surprising directions, from the gothic chime of Monkey to a vivacious spin on the folk song Cindy, I’ll Marry You Someday.

Patty Griffin pops up with sublime vocal harmonies as Plant tackles some intriguing material. Opening with rhythmic overload on a Los Lobos rocker Angel Dance, he conjures up an authentic 1950s sound on an old Jimmie Rodgers hit Falling in Love Again, delivers an edgy treatment of a lesser-known Townes Van Zant song Harm’s Swift Way; creates a virulent swirling chorus on Richard Thompson’s House of Cards; and performs a masterly arrangement of the spiritual Satan Your Kingdom Must Come Down, spritely banjo vying with broody guitar and ghostly backing choir as the track develops its subtle air of menace.

Just as producer T-Bone Burnett deservedly copped much of the acclaim for Raising Sand, Buddy Miller merits much credit for the richness here. But the glory rightly belongs to Plant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So - Magneta Lane, Robert Plant and The Walkmen walk into a bar...

And Steve Wilson, our music guru says...

Reverberations-9212010_r620x300.jpg

By Steve Wilson

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Kansas City Free Press

Robert Plant – Band of Joy (Esparanza/Rounder Records)

"Plant pursues the slow burn roots muse with Buddy Miller at the helm"

Robert_Plant__Band_of_Joy_t180.jpg

Robert Plant – Band of Joy (Esparanza/Rounder Records)

Robert Plant is a sixty-two year old man intent on personal and musical maturity. Maybe Iggy Pop can still (sort of) pull off the shirtless thing, but Plant probably doesn't fit into those frilly Seventies girl tops anymore. His collaboration with Alison Krauss, Raising Sand, was on every aging rock dad's 2007 Christmas list (2008, too – dads don't really much care what's new). Raising Sand was immensely enjoyable. While T-Bone Burnett's too genteel production kept the pot from boiling, the slow simmer of Krauss and Plant's undeniable chemistry satisfied.

On Plant's new solo release, Band of Joy, Buddy Miller's production puts a little more fire on the burner. He coaxes fine performances from Plant and his supporting cast. Miller's roadhouse/churchyard guitar playing incorporates practically every American roots music resource skillfully and distinctively. Patty Griffin, a distinguished artist in her own right, is frequent female foil to Plant on Band of Joy, her fiery singing raising a bit more sand from Plant than Krauss.

The beauty of Band of Joy is inseparable from what makes it an essentially conservative work. Plant covers Los Lobos ("Angel Dance") and Richard Thompson ("House of Cards") with taste and spirit. His apparent affection for the gorgeous slo-core of the band Low is evidenced by treatments of two tunes from their Great Destroyer album ("Silver Rider" and "Monkey"), both played fairly true to the originals. Plant covers Billy and Bobby Babineux's lost soul nugget "You Can't Buy My Love," a song that Plant likely cannibalized from Barbara Lynn's version of the tune for Zeppelin's "How Many More Years." Something of an answer song to the Beatles' "Can't Buy Me Love," it's the closest Plant gets to straight up pop on Band of Joy. Plant's take on Townes Van Zandt's "Harm's Swift Way" is astute; he nails it, leaving you hungry for more Plant/Van Zandt interpretations. When Plant tackles material from traditional roots (the sweetly lurid "Cindy, I'll Marry You Someday" and the gospel message "Satan Your Kingdom Must Come Down") he sounds totally at home. And for all the talk of Plant's movement toward folk and blues roots, it reminds that Led Zeppelin was all over this music too, in their over-sized sort of way.

Man, everything on Band of Joy is musical and compelling (okay, the Elvis homage of "Falling in Love Again" is pretty turgid). Really, what's not to like? I suspect that I will find much to treasure for years to come from Band of Joy. So what's eating me? Why can't I be more enthusiastic? Well, this is all so very nice that I half expect Plant and Miller to show up at fund raising time on PBS with this set. To be sure, trying to relive the Hammer of the Gods in some Zeppelin-lite outfit would be even more conservative (and pathetic). But with two age-appropriate and socially correct old guy records under his cock belt, I really hope Plant hooks up with Reigning Sound or the Black Angels or some other raging rock machine. Or maybe the guy who always raves about Moby Grape and Tim Buckley should cover "Indifference" and "Once I Was," respectively — something, anything to bring back that roar of a voice.

Reverberating: 8.3

http://www.kcfreepre...lkmen-walk-bar/

Edited by SteveAJones

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This week's music reviews

From: The Australian

October 02, 2010

ROCK

Band of Joy

Robert Plant

UMA

4-1/2 stars

ROBERT Plant has been down a few musical alleys since his Led Zeppelin heyday, but none of them was so unpredictable and rewarding as his head-long leap into Americana three years ago with the album Raising Sand. That album, with bluegrass chanteuse Alison Krauss, proved that the rock veteran had more to offer than the the prospect of a Led Zep reunion.

In the company of producer T Bone Burnett, Grant and Krauss created a little marvel, a beautiful melding of voices and some highly original reworkings of roots gems. A follow-up was planned but never realised. Instead we have Band of Joy, an album with its heart in the same place but with a change of personnel. American singer Patty Griffin is Plant's foil this time, although to a much lesser degree. Roots legend Buddy Miller co-produced with Plant, and they lay a sexy foundation of rumbling tom-toms and ambient guitars to underpin the vocals.

Plant's voice is a revelation in a roots setting and he excels here, particularly on Los Lobos's Angel Dance, the Richard Thompson classic House of Cards and the ethereal Silver Rider, one of two songs from American lo-fi outfit Low. He makes traditional tunes his own as well, including the banjo-led Cindy, I'll Marry You Some Day and the gospel-lite Satan, Your Kingdom Must Come Down. Inspired and inspiring.

Iain Shedden

http://www.theaustra...from=public_rss

Edited by SteveAJones

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From NoDepression.com:

Robert Plant and my part in his renaissance

Posted by Tim on October 4, 2010 at 9:08pm

CD Review

Robert Plant and the Band of Joy

Band of Joy

(Rounder)

BandofJoyCover.jpg

I like the musical trajectory Robert Plant has taken since the heady daze of Led Zeppelin, not least because my own tastes have described a similar arc. Not that I'm comparing myself to the rock icon, you understand; just that I find it interesting that Plant's move into roots music mirrors precisely the path of a lot of ye olde time Zep fans I know.

I'm talking about Generation Jonesers who had Zeppelin as a staple of their musical diet and who have, through their own investigations, found their way into the folkways of the roots and alt.country scene that Plant is now involved with. What's interesting to me is that the stories of these Gen Jonesers are often the same.

They were fanatical about whatever music they were into in their teenage years, were immersed in it so that it was a central part of their life and their identity, a state of affairs illustrated by the image of them moving into their first post-parental accommodation (generally a group house, often in another city) and taking with them -- ahead of any other possessions -- a milk crate (or ten) filled with LPs.

After that, moving into their twenties and thirties, getting jobs, maybe getting married, music was pushed more and more to the background. Other things, like air, became more central to their lives, though catching up with old friends, now flung to the four corners of the world, inevitably involved breaking out the old LPs, or maybe the repurchased CD versions of the old albums, and reminiscing endlessly about how great those bands were.

In fact, the advent of CDs was probably the first thing in the world of music that really grabbed their attention since...well, name an arbitrary date in the 70s. Of course, it was more a geeky interest in the technology rather than a rediscovery of music, and sure enough, the CDs we bought pretty much mirrored the LP collections they already had.

Good news for the likes of Robert Plant, no doubt.

To read the remainder of the review, click here.

Edited by Jahfin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi:

If it has already been posted that BOJ is available in Canada then forgive me for not seeing the post...I found the CD at my local big box department store this weekend..

I've listened to the CD only once,,,,I definitely like Angel Dance...after hearing the other tunes my first response is some are more sombre than I expected...very sombre...I'll have to listen a few more times...

Juliet :coffee:

Edited by Juliet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't stand that album cover. I remember seeing the Sensational Alex Harvey Band years ago and haven't had the nightmares I used to have about their guitarist till lately.

It's not that I have such an aversion to clowns, but these are repulsive to me.

zal1.gif

robert-plant.jpg

I try to keep telling myself you can't judge a book by it's cover, but in this case, my judgement stands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gazz really? You don't like anything on BOJ? I love every song especially Monkey and Silver Rider. How about Buddy? OMG he's amazing!! There's no style of music that man can't play and also Darryl and Patty are perfect. Not sure why you think it's dull? I also think it's all very sexy but maybe you have to be female to feel that? I mean, who the hell else could take a song like "Cindy I'll Marry You" and make it sexy? Did you like Dreamland?

I just heard an interview of him the other day on World Cafe. He said in January they are going to start writing new stuff. He said they've been working on some new music already -- everyone playing things on different instruments and writing them down during sound checks. Robert said he is very into what he's doing now with the band and is going to continue to take it further. Check out David Dye's interview of him in World Cafe Live. GREAT interview. I also heard David interviewing Darryl Scott on another World Cafe show. Darryl said that this thing is not stopping and will continue with performances into next year. He said he's so inspired by Robert's great knowledge and love for the music.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Velocities in Music #248

January 21, 2011

Thanks for this Steve. Although, these guys liked the album, they need to do their homework on this. They talked about some problems with the songwriting on "BOJ", when they should know that the album consists of mostly covers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went to the Tower - Philly show last night. It was beyond great and I was in the second row and to be that close watching and looking at him was insane! The crowd went crazy screaming and standing through most of the show and Robert looked SO happy. Robert is still reworking and changing all the songs around and everyone was an amazing singer but when Robert sings and you hear it in person, the power and intensity of his voice just blows everyone else away! And omg he's gorgeous. I had to somehow get through ice and snow to see him but it was so worth it and I'd do it again another million times. Cannot get enough of him. and I LOVED his shiny brown boots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...