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Dianaj

Correct me if I'm wrong...

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...But isn't it illegal to use or record a song for your own personal gain without permission from the band? This sleezy politician in Central Florida has re-recorded Stairway To Heaven and changed the words to slander his opponent. I'm sure , somehow its probably legal, but it still pisses me off.

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You don't have to get permission to record a cover version, as long as you pay the proper royalties and licensing fees.

However, you are NOT allowed to change the lyrics without permission. (For example, Dolly Parton had to get permission for her version of Stairway, because she altered some of the lyrics.)

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I found it. Go to You Tube and search for "Stairway to nowhere" and you will see it. It was paid for by " Alan Grayson for Congress" His opponents name is Daniel Webster.

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...But isn't it illegal to use or record a song for your own personal gain without permission from the band? This sleezy politician in Central Florida has re-recorded Stairway To Heaven and changed the words to slander his opponent. I'm sure , somehow its probably legal, but it still pisses me off.

Try This:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVKpeKQ4PpI

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...But isn't it illegal to use or record a song for your own personal gain without permission from the band? This sleezy politician in Central Florida has re-recorded Stairway To Heaven and changed the words to slander his opponent. I'm sure , somehow its probably legal, but it still pisses me off.

Cover versions are ok but the use for political purposes may infringe on the writer's moral right and this argument can be invoked for a lawsuit.

EDIT: after listening to it, it sounds more like plagiarism than a cover version...

Edited by hecube

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Surely satire as we know it would disappear if this sort of thing was illegal, whether it's songs, movies, or whatever (I know this particular example can't really be called satire)?

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Surely satire as we know it would disappear if this sort of thing was illegal, whether it's songs, movies, or whatever (I know this particular example can't really be called satire)?

"parody" is specifically permitted by U.S. copyright law. For example, Weird Al does not need to get permission for his parody versions (even though he always asks permission as a matter of courtesy.)

However, when you are using parody to advance a specific agenda (which Jimmy Page and Robert Plant may not agree with), then you might cross a line to where you're no longer protected under the law. Here is a quote from Wikipedia:

When Tom Forsythe appropriated Barbie dolls for his photography project "Food Chain Barbie," Mattel lost its claims of copyright and trademark infringement against him because his work effectively parodies Barbie and the values she represents. But when Jeff Koons tried to justify his appropriation of Art Rogers' photograph "Puppies" in his sculpture "String of Puppies" with the same parody defense, he lost because his work was not presented as a parody of Rogers' photograph in particular, but of society at large, which was deemed insufficiently justificatory.

Since this politician's song is a parody of his opponent (and NOT of the song "Stairway To Heaven"), then he might not have a case.

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"parody" is specifically permitted by U.S. copyright law. For example, Weird Al does not need to get permission for his parody versions (even though he always asks permission as a matter of courtesy.)

However, when you are using parody to advance a specific agenda (which Jimmy Page and Robert Plant may not agree with), then you might cross a line to where you're no longer protected under the law. Here is a quote from Wikipedia:

Since this politician's song is a parody of his opponent (and NOT of the song "Stairway To Heaven"), then he might not have a case.

I would be interested to hear what Mr. Page and Mr. Plant would say about this.

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