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Rhianna just won for worst lip sync performance EVER! What a joke!!! Grammy's should be ashamed of themselves especially after Mick Jaggar and Barbra Streisand's great performances. Unbelievable :slapface:

Jaggger was great and so was Emminem. But Bob Dylan? Oh man. I love Dylan and his legacy. But how can he go out there adn sound like he just smoked a pack of Pal Malls? He just plain showed his age and I dont get it.

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So all you that think Jeff Beck is better now than he was in the 1960's and 1970's saw him perform back then? If so, then you can make that assumption with creedence. My main point was his actual music, not so much his ability. Sure he's still got it, no doubt, but the music itself just isn't as good to me. Maybe I'll have a different assessment when I see him on the upcoming tour of which I already have tickets. :D

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That Eminem song was total crap!

I don't understand what people like in rap music.

I love John Legend! He went to the same high school that my husband went to.

Edited to say: Looks like Justin Beiber is getting shut out so far. He hasn't won any of the awards that have been aired on tv as of yet.

I am not a fan of rap but I thought Eminem's performance was fantastic.

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Wait, Who Is This Esperanza Spalding?

by Patrick Jarenwattananon

Forget the Arcade Fire: The biggest upset of the 2011 Grammy Awards, held Sunday night, was when jazz bassist and singer Esperanza Spalding won for Best New Artist.

A broad contingent of Spalding's fans, especially within but certainly not limited to the jazz community, knew she has winning musicianship. But few believed she had even a puncher's chance at the actual award. Especially for its highest-profile categories, the Grammys tend to reward top-selling acts signed to major record labels, regardless of musical merit. And with teenage heartthrob Justin Bieber in the running — not to mention Drake, Florence and the Machine and Mumford and Sons — her missing-out seemed a foregone conclusion. The Recording Academy had never given this honor to a jazz artist before.

On its own, Spalding's third and latest album, the string-soaked, independently released Chamber Music Society, received zero Grammy nominations — not even in the relatively overlooked Best Contemporary Jazz Album or Best Classical Crossover Album categories — and just as much airplay on commercial radio. Much of the mainstream pop audience, which may well have heard her name for the first time Sunday night, surely thought: Esperanza who? (One presumably angry Justin Bieber fan vandalized Spalding's Wikipedia entry by writing, among other things, "WHO THE HECK ARE YOU ANYWAY?")

Indeed, how could a jazz musician possibly win the Best New Artist Grammy in 2011?

The easy answer is that she's a highly skilled and highly marketable musician. She's obviously photogenic and preternaturally poised in the spotlight, be it on national TV, performing for President Barack Obama three times (twice at the White House, once at the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony), headlining sold-out shows across North America and Europe, paying tribute to Prince, opening for Prince, co-hosting the Grammy pre-telecast ceremony, or receiving a Grammy herself. This, plus her backstory, youth (she's 26, oldest among the nominees but young as acclaimed jazz performers go) and virtuosic talent, make her a natural spokesperson for an American art form, and the recipient of some crossover attention.

About that talent. As a bassist, she was tapped to teach at Berklee College of Music — her alma mater — at age 20, and plays in bands with today's top-tier jazz musicians. As a singer, she has an exuberant, chirpy gusto. As a composer, her music touches on R&B, Brazilian music and classical chamber music, but is rooted in structure and improvisatory feeling. And as a performer, she exudes stage presence and charisma. She seems to innately understand the character of pop and rock music, and far from being against it, embraces its rhythms, stagecraft and energy — especially on her breakout album, 2008's Esperanza. (Q-Tip says he's producing her next album.)

Perhaps most importantly, her music fundamentally depends on working with other people in real time. "I have much more experience playing bass for other bandleaders than leading my own gigs, and I love being a sideman just as much," she told Spinner recently. "That's why I got into music. It wasn't to become my own phenomenon; it was to play music with other people. So whomever wants to play with me, and I can, and I'm into it, and inspired? Then off I go." The jazz world from which she hails runs on this ability to collaborate, often with those you've barely met before. "Thank you to the incredible community and family of musicians I'm so blessed to be a part of," she affirmed in her acceptance speech.

Whether her victory means that more mainstream attention will be paid to the jazz community around her, and not just to her own career, is doubtful. The last prime-time Grammy win for a jazz artist went to Herbie Hancock for his Joni Mitchell tribute album; it didn't perceptibly translate to any trickle-down attention to anyone who wasn't Herbie Hancock (who won Best Instrumental Jazz Solo this year). Oddly, the Recording Academy seemingly did its best to trivialize active jazz listening during the ceremony: Her prime-time performance with the Grammy jazz ensemble couldn't be appreciated over a live voiceover dedicated to MusiCares. And Spalding's music isn't always jazz, or some would say it isn't even jazz at all, as grounded in jazz's principles and musicianship as it is.

Jazz musicians are generally happy for her, though. And it's not just because they're friends and colleagues, or because of the slim chance that their own careers are boosted by association. The overwhelming majority still don't feel the Grammys are particularly relevant to their day-to-day worlds. But I presume many this morning do appreciate the fact that their values are, for once, receiving a little affirmation from an unexpected source.

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I never watch the Grammy Awards but one thing which I found really hilarious when I scanned the list of this year's winners (out of curiousity of course ;)), is the fact that the "Fuck You" song actually won a Grammy for "Best Urban / Alternative Performance" :hysterical:

I am, to be honest, rather happy because that song has made me laugh so hard and put me in a good mood so often that I do think it deserves some sort of honour! :P

If you guys have no idea what song I'm talking about, you can check it out here :

Not meant for folks under 18 years of age! :whistling:

Enjoy! :P

Edited by Kiwi_Zep_Fan87
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I didn't watch much of the show, but I did happen to catch Dylan.  How embarrassing.  Talk about prostituting your music.  I could have just as easily been in that line-up of musicians playing "Maggie's Farm"

Ever heard the Zep July 6, 1973 Chicago show ? Plant gives Bob a run for his money ! ;) I believe EVEN YOU could have done that better !

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I didn't watch much of the show, but I did happen to catch Dylan. How embarrassing. Talk about prostituting your music. I could have just as easily been in that line-up of musicians playing "Maggie's Farm".

What I found embarrassing was Dylan's performance and I say that as lifelong fan. His voice has always been an acquired taste but last night was proof positive that it's now completely shot. As for Mumford & Sons and the Avett Brothers, I enjoyed both of their performances. "Maggie's Farm" was ruined not by them but by Dylan, he brought absolutely nothing to it but evidence that he should really hang it up at this point. Not even Auto Tune could have saved his ass.

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What I found embarrassing was Dylan's performance and I say that as lifelong fan. His voice has always been an acquired taste but last night was proof positive that it's now completely shot. As for Mumford & Sons and the Avett Brothers, I enjoyed both of their performances. "Maggie's Farm" was ruined not by them but by Dylan, he brought absolutely nothing to it but evidence that he should really hang it up at this point. Not even Auto Tune could have saved his ass.

Was never a Dylan fan but found that performance very sad indeed for him.

The whole show did not impress me at all. After the fraggle rock song with who ever that singer was, the costume was totally distracting, I couldn't watch it any more. Which is a shame, cuz I understand the Mick was the best part of the show, which I missed.

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The Grammy Awards, like Rolling Stone magazine, have loooong ceased to have anything to do with good music, and the fact that they hardly give out any awards on the air(I think only 10 were given out in 3 hours on last night's telecast) means that the only reason to watch is for the possibility of train-wreck performances.

Since the Grammy's were on the same time as the BAFTA's on BBC America, I tivod the Grammys and watched them later after the BAFTA's(hooray for Sir Christopher Lee for getting a Fellowship award...King's Speech won Best Picture and Best Actor while Social Network garnered the Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay).

Bob Dylan was horrible...sounded like a sick frog and off all the songs he's written, we get yet ANOTHER "Maggie's Farm"?!? Yawn.

I have more to say...but I gotta Valentine's date to make. Ciao!

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My main problem with the Dylan performance was that he would allow a dozen or so musicians to act like charlatans while they accompanied him. Maybe the people who run the Grammy's where behind it all. I would have preferred a more suitable backing band instead of the overblown, spectacle it was.

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My main problem with the Dylan performance was that he would allow a dozen or so musicians to act like charlatans while they accompanied him. Maybe the people who run the Grammy's where behind it all. I would have preferred a more suitable backing band instead of the overblown, spectacle it was.

On another board someone accused the Avetts of "faking it", I'm curious to know what it is they were faking. Same for Mumford & Sons, particularly since you also referred to them as "charlatans".

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On another board someone accused the Avetts of "faking it", I'm curious to know what it is they were faking. Same for Mumford & Sons, particularly since you also referred to them as "charlatans".

There was no musicianship being displayed. They mugged for the TV, wore hats, bowties, etc. The music seemed to take a back seat to the showboating. I would have preferred Bob to use a 4 piece backing band playing acoustic instruments and displaying their talents. I'm sure both bands are talented, unfortunately anybody tuning in to the Grammy's would probably not be inspired to buy any of their music based on what was presented. I actually have a song by the Avetts courtesy of Starbuck's Pick of the Week.

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