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Rock N' Rollin' Man

Japan hit by 8.9 earthquake

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As I understand what has happened at the Fukushima power plant, the

reactors survived a Magnitude 8.9 quake whose epicenter was located a

relatively short distance offshore. I believe that the

specifications called for them to survive a Magnitude 8.0 quake. So,

the reactors and their piping did well.

It was the failure of diesel-powered generators that caused most of

the ensuing problems.

When a boiling-water reactor is SCRAMed, the control rods are dropped

into the core, and the chain reaction damps out. The core continues

to generate heat due to the further degradation of daughter elements

that were created by the fission of the reactor fuel (usually

uranium).

The residual heat has to be dumped, so water must continue to flow

through the reactor core. Typically, this is done by pumps driven by

electric motors. The electricity comes from other generators feeding

into the national grid.

In this case, the reactors SCRAMed when the earthquake happened, as

they were designed to so. However, the earthquake destroyed

transmission lines, so the Fukushima plant lost its connection to the

grid.

On-site Diesel motors started up and spun electrical generators.

Coolant continued to flow through the reactor cores. This was as

intended... a first line of defense.

Then the tsunami came in. The diesel motors ended up under water,

unable to breathe. The salt water probably also got into the

windings and the commutators of the generators that the diesel motors

were intended to drive.

Batteries took over, but the batteries ran out after several hours.

The batteries were only intended to last for that period of time.

Mobile generators were brought in from elsewhere, but there were

problems hooking them up.

If they had only built watertight cofferdams in which the motors and

generators could sit, protected from the tsunami, the reactors

probably would have come out of this OK.

I cannot understand why the diesel generators were not better

shielded from potential tsunamis. These plants sit right on the

shore, and tsunamis and earthquakes are known to occur in and near

Japan.

I am also surprised that the plant designers did not include, as a

final fall-back, steam-powered pumps that could be driven by the

residual heat in the core itself, or some sort of gravity-fed/

convection-driven coolant loop and heat exchanger that could bring

the core to near stone-cold condition without needing an external

power source.

I assume that such a design is possible, though it would surely add

to the expense of construction and maintenance. In the long run, it

would have proven money well spent. So long as there is enough heat

in the core to cause problems, would there not be enough heat to

generate steam, which could turn mechanical pumps? The power to cool

down the core would come from the core itself. When there was no

longer enough heat energy to generate steam and turn the pumps, the

core would have cooled down enough so that there would not longer be

any danger of a meltdown or other runaway condition.

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Air China has cancelled flights from Beijing and Shanghai to Tokyo on Tuesday afternoon and in the evening, as well as some on Wednesday, according to the company's website (www.airchina.com.cn).A company spokeswoman said they were aware of the radiation issue, but that was not the reason for the cancellations. The airline just did not want aircraft remaining in Japan overnight, she added.

uk.reuters.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Japan PM: Radiation leaking from damaged plant

Kan urges people within 30 kilometers of Fukushima Dai-ichi to stay indoors

SOMA, Japan Radiation is spewing from damaged reactors at a crippled nuclear power plant in tsunami-ravaged northeastern Japan in a dramatic escalation of the 4-day-old catastrophe. The prime minister has warned residents to stay inside or risk getting radiation sickness.

In a nationally televised statement, Prime Minister Naoto Kan said radiation has spread from the three reactors of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant in one of the hardest-hit provinces in Friday's 9.0-magnitude earthquake and the ensuing tsunami. He told people living within 12 miles (20 kilometers) of the plant to evacuate and those within 19 miles (30 kilometers) to stay indoors.

"The level seems very high, and there is still a very high risk of more radiation coming out," Kan said.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said early Tuesday that a fourth reactor at the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex was on fire and that more radiation was released, but officials announced later in the day that the fire was extinguished.

"Now we are talking about levels that can damage human health. These are readings taken near the area where we believe the releases are happening. Far away, the levels should be lower," Edano said.

A third explosion in four days rocked the earthquake-damaged plant earlier Tuesday.

Two sources told NBC News' Robert Bazell that the blast breached the containment structure and that radiation had leaked out.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It now seems that the nuclear fuel rods inside all three functioning reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex are melting, a senior government official said.

"Although we cannot directly check it, it's highly likely happening," Edano said.

msnbc.msn.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

These statements came from the U.S. military about 2 or 3 hours ago. Looks like the missing plane at 0:26 that was seen earlier in a photo of Sendai Airport taken before the tsunami hit.

Edited by Silver Rider

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As I understand what has happened at the Fukushima power plant, the

reactors survived a Magnitude 8.9 quake whose epicenter was located a

relatively short distance offshore. I believe that the

specifications called for them to survive a Magnitude 8.0 quake. So,

the reactors and their piping did well.

It was the failure of diesel-powered generators that caused most of

the ensuing problems.

When a boiling-water reactor is SCRAMed, the control rods are dropped

into the core, and the chain reaction damps out. The core continues

to generate heat due to the further degradation of daughter elements

that were created by the fission of the reactor fuel (usually

uranium).

The residual heat has to be dumped, so water must continue to flow

through the reactor core. Typically, this is done by pumps driven by

electric motors. The electricity comes from other generators feeding

into the national grid.

In this case, the reactors SCRAMed when the earthquake happened, as

they were designed to so. However, the earthquake destroyed

transmission lines, so the Fukushima plant lost its connection to the

grid.

On-site Diesel motors started up and spun electrical generators.

Coolant continued to flow through the reactor cores. This was as

intended... a first line of defense.

Then the tsunami came in. The diesel motors ended up under water,

unable to breathe. The salt water probably also got into the

windings and the commutators of the generators that the diesel motors

were intended to drive.

Batteries took over, but the batteries ran out after several hours.

The batteries were only intended to last for that period of time.

Mobile generators were brought in from elsewhere, but there were

problems hooking them up.

If they had only built watertight cofferdams in which the motors and

generators could sit, protected from the tsunami, the reactors

probably would have come out of this OK.

I cannot understand why the diesel generators were not better

shielded from potential tsunamis. These plants sit right on the

shore, and tsunamis and earthquakes are known to occur in and near

Japan.

I am also surprised that the plant designers did not include, as a

final fall-back, steam-powered pumps that could be driven by the

residual heat in the core itself, or some sort of gravity-fed/

convection-driven coolant loop and heat exchanger that could bring

the core to near stone-cold condition without needing an external

power source.

I assume that such a design is possible, though it would surely add

to the expense of construction and maintenance. In the long run, it

would have proven money well spent. So long as there is enough heat

in the core to cause problems, would there not be enough heat to

generate steam, which could turn mechanical pumps? The power to cool

down the core would come from the core itself. When there was no

longer enough heat energy to generate steam and turn the pumps, the

core would have cooled down enough so that there would not longer be

any danger of a meltdown or other runaway condition.

The plant was near the sea....luckily!!!!

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by Tech. Sgt. Phillip Butterfield

35th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

3/15/2011 - MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan (AFNS) -- The residents of Misawa Air Base, Japan, are collecting clothing donations in support of the base's off-base community.

"When we put out the call for donations, I was truly surprised by the overwhelming support we received from the Base community," said Kelli Wimmer, wife of Col. Van Wimmer, 35th Fighter Wing vice commander. "These clothing donations will go a long way to help our Misawa City neighbors. We are here to support our Japanese friends as much as possible."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Katie O'Czopek removes bags of clothing donations from her father's van Mar. 14, 2011, at Misawa Air Base, Japan. Edgren High School officials collected donations for the Misawa City community. Ms. O'Czopek is the daughter of Mark O'Czopek, a government contractor. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Phillip Butterfield)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

3/15/2011 1:01:50 PM ET

God bless you guys as you deal with this horrific tragedy. My thoughts and prayers are with you your loved ones and the community. I spent six wonderful years at Misawa AB with the 14th Fightin Samurai. We spent many weekends rock climbing in Kuji ice climbing in the gorge and hiking in the Hakkodas and all throughout Japan. It's a beautiful country with beautiful people.Retired MSGT 14th FS - 1999

Mike McCarthy , Portland Oregon

af.mil/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

3/15/2011 - Senior Airman Jason Barbieri guides a fuels truck onto a C-130H Hercules March 15, 2011, at Yokota Air Base, Japan. The fuels truck was taken to Yamagota Airport to support Japan's earthquake and tsunami relief efforts. Airman Barbieri is assigned to the 36th Airlift Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Jonathan Steffen)

af.mil

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

by Tech. Sgt. Phillip Butterfield

35th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

3/15/2011 - MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan (AFNS) -- Misawa Air Base was shaken March 11 by the 8.9 magnitude earthquake that struck Japan but sustained only minor damage with no injuries or loss of life.

"Our focus is on the recovery of the base and assisting our Japanese allies," said Col. Michael Rothstein, the 35th Fighter Wing commander. "We will do whatever it takes to get us both on our feet again, and I believe we have the best people on the job for this task."

Further aiding in base recovery were the Airmen here supporting and establishing command and control operations, said Lt. Col. Dwayne Robison, the 35th Civil Engineer Squadron commander.

"Our Airmen and family members aided in recovery efforts almost immediately after the earthquake," he said. "The earthquake struck the region when the base was in the middle of an operational readiness exercise. So we already had our emergency operations center and our unit control centers (up and running). This enabled people to call in immediately with reports of damages, and we had no delay with responding to their needs."

af.mil

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

by Master Sgt. Scott T. Sturkol

Air Mobility Command Public Affairs

3/14/2011 - SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. (AFNS) -- On March 11, an 8.9-magnitude earthquake struck Japan and a tsunami followed, creating widespread destruction throughout the country.

Within a short time, U.S. service members were gearing up to support a response, and air transportation Airmen, also known as aerial porters, were no exception.

Aerial porters are among the busiest Airmen at Misawa Air Base, Japan. They have been building cargo pallets and moving cargo 24 hours a day to keep humanitarian relief operations moving wherever it's needed.

Also, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, aerial porters from the 735th Air Mobility Squadron were busy March 12 loading generators and related cargo onto a C-17 Globemaster III that was heading to Japan.

The plane departed quickly, and a squadron commander, who was on temporary duty to Hawaii, was able to return to his home station of Yokota Air Base, Japan.

"Today I'm proud to be in the U.S. Air Force," said Lt. Col. Rocky Favorito, the 374th Communications Squadron commander, who returned to Yokota AB with humanitarian aid in tow.

At Misawa AB, aerial porters like Airman 1st Class Ryan Lloyd, of the 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron, are working to move cargo belonging to search-and-rescue personnel arriving in Japan. Aerial porters at Misawa have received numerous aircraft, from civilian airliners to C-17s, and are continuing 24-hour operations as more and more cargo and people flow in from around the world.

af.mil

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ugM23Ff3QQ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLr9kxrSx4c Edited by Silver Rider

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Japan's Quake Could Have Irradiated the Entire US

"Had the massive 8.9 Richter-scale earthquake that has just savaged Japan hit off the California coast, it could have ripped apart at least four coastal reactors and sent a lethal cloud of radiation across the entire United States. (http://nukefree.org/ace-hoffman-computerized-graphic-what-if-chernobyl-h... )

The two huge reactors each at San Onofre and Diablo Canyon are not designed to withstand such powerful shocks. All four are extremely close to major faults.

All four reactors are located relatively low to the coast. They are vulnerable to tsunamis like those now expected to hit as many as fifty countries.

San Onofre sits between San Diego and Los Angeles. A radioactive cloud spewing from one or both reactors there would do incalculable damage to either or both urban areas before carrying over the rest of southern and central California.

Diablo Canyon is at Avila Beach, on the coast just west of San Luis Obispo, between Los Angeles and San Francisco. A radioactive eruption there would pour into central California and, depending on the winds, up to the Bay Area or southeast into Santa Barbara and then to Los Angeles. The cloud would at very least permanently destroy much of the region on which most Americans rely for their winter supply of fresh vegetables.

By the federal Price-Anderson Act of 1957, the owners of the destroyed reactors---including Pacific Gas & Electric and Southern California Edison---would be covered by private insurance only up to $11 billion, a tiny fraction of the trillions of dollars worth of damage that would be done. The rest would become the responsibility of the federal taxpayer and the fallout victims. Virtually all homeowner insurance policies in the United States exempt the insurers from liability from a reactor disaster.

The most definitive recent study of the 1986 Chernobyl disaster puts the death toll at 985,000. (http://nukefree.org/link-full-text-chernobyl-its-consequences ) The accident irradiated a remote rural area. The nearest city, Kiev, is 80 kilometers away.

But San Luis Obispo is some ten miles directly downwind from Diablo Canyon. The region around San Onofre has become heavily suburbanized.

Heavy radioactive fallout spread from Chernobyl blanketed all of Europe within a matter of days. It covered an area far larger than the United States. (http://nukefree.org/astonishing-computerized-graphic-reconstruction-cher... )

Fallout did hit the jet stream and then the coast of California, thousands of miles away, within ten days. It then carried all the way across the northern tier of the United States.

Chernobyl Unit Four was of comparable size to the two reactors at Diablo Canyon, and somewhat larger than the two at San Onofre.

But it was very new when it exploded. California's four coastal reactors have been operating since the 1970s and 1980s. Their accumulated internal radioactive burdens could exceed what was spewed at Chernobyl.

Japanese officials say all affected reactors automatically shut, with no radiation releases. But they are not reliable. In 2007 a smaller earthquake rocked the seven-reactor Kashiwazaki site and forced its lengthy shut-down.

Preliminary reports indicate at least one fire at a Japanese reactor hit by this quake and tsunami

( http://nukefree.org/preliminary-report-indicates-fire-quake-tsunami-stricken-reactor ).

In 1986 the Perry nuclear plant, east of Cleveland, was rocked by a 5.5 Richter-scale shock, many orders of magnitude weaker than this one. That quake broke pipes and other key equipment within the plant. It took out nearby roads and bridges.

Thankfully, Perry had not yet opened. An official Ohio commission later warned that evacuation during such a quake would be impossible.

Numerous other American reactors sit on or near earthquake faults.

The Obama Administration is now asking Congress for $36 billion in new loan guarantees to build more commercial reactors.

It has yet to reveal its exact plans for dealing with a major reactor disaster. Nor has it identified the cash or human reserves needed to cover the death and destruction imposed by the reactors' owners. "

Edited by sweetredwine

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The two huge reactors each at San Onofre and Diablo Canyon are not designed to withstand such powerful shocks. All four are extremely close to major faults.

They evacuated the whole town of Avila Beach to higher ground when the tsunami warning was issued. San Onofre and Diablo (Avila) are not located in a subduction zone, making them less of a potential risk than Japan, which is perched on a subduction zone where the Pacific plate moving at a rate of about 8 centimeters per year, subducts under the Okhotsk plate upon which the Japanese island of Honshu sits. Tsunamis are a more serious problem in Japan because there is so little warning time due to the geology of the area. It usually takes much longer for a tsunami to reach California, allowing a sufficient warning time to move to higher ground. In Japan the small island masses are like floating candles inside a tiny bowl filled with water (small bays and inlets surrounded by, and containing, islands). Once an event disturbs the water it then immediately sloshes over all the candles. In contrast, most of California sits at the edge of a very large bowl of water (vast Pacific Ocean), so the waves have plenty of room to disperse away from the source of the earthquake. A possible exception would be the San Francisco Bay area in the event that a quake would happen within close confines of the bay itself and very near to heavily populated land masses.

San Onofre Nuclear Plant is designed for a maxium 7.0 quake and a 25-foot tsunami. San Onofre's nuclear plant features a reinforced tsunami wall that reaches 30 feet above sea level.

Southern California Edison spokesman Gil Alexander said the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) could handle any predicted earthquake but not as strong as the 8.9 magnitude that hit Japan.

"U.S. nuclear plants must be designed to exceed the maximum threat that scientists determine for the plant's specific geographic area," said Alexander. "When the San Onofre plant was being designed in the 1980s, a scientific review looked at a fault line five miles from the plant and it was determined that the maximum credible earthquake threat for our property was 6.5-6.6 magnitude."

Alexander said the policy at that time was for plants to exceed those threats and SONGS was built to survive a nearby earthquake with a magnitude of 7.0.

kpbs.org

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Friday, March 11, 2011 3:55 PM EST'

AVILA BEACH -- At 1pm Friday Avila Beach remained a ghost town, in the wake of a tsunami alert, still in effect. The roads heading into the beach community are closed. The California Highway Patrol is turning people around. Vacationers in Avila Beach made their way to higher ground to watch a mother nature put on a show. Hundreds lined the coast in Pismo Beach to watch, as well. Just after 8:30am, they began to see evidence of the tsunami. The water receded, then surged back on shore, in a matter of minutes. The dramatic drops and rises in the sea level are continuing. Beaches were evacuated, piers were shut down and access points to beaches were closed and guarded by law enforcement personnel.

kcoy.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

AVILA BEACH, Calif. – Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) today responded to a tsunami warning by declaring an Unusual Event at its Diablo Canyon Power Plant Unit 1 and Unit 2 near Avila Beach, Calif. All plant safety systems and components remain in normal operating condition and both units are currently operating at 100 percent power.

The Unusual Event was declared at approximately 1:23 a.m., Friday, March 11, 2011. As defined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, an Unusual Event is any other-than-normal plant-related condition that does not require any emergency action by the general public or any government authorities. An Unusual Event is the lowest of four levels of emergency classification.

PG&E will continue to monitor the situation and work with local authorities throughout the county. DCPP personnel undergo extensive emergency preparedness training and participate in various exercises throughout the year to ensure they are always ready to safely, swiftly and effectively manage emergency events.

The utility is also assisting with local emergency response efforts. In response to a county declaration for Avila Beach residents to relocate to higher elevation, PG&E has opened its Energy Education Center at 6588 Ontario Road off of Highway 101 in San Luis Obispo.

High swell estimates at Port San Luis may cause flooding near the Avila Beach gate entrance. Diablo Canyon has implemented a plan which allows us to continue to operate the facility safely in the event that access to Diablo Canyon Power Plant is restricted.

diablocanyonpge.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Edited by Silver Rider

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Japan's Quake Could Have Irradiated the Entire US

"Had the massive 8.9 Richter-scale earthquake that has just savaged Japan hit off the California coast, it could have ripped apart at least four coastal reactors and sent a lethal cloud of radiation across the entire United States. (http://nukefree.org/...-chernobyl-h... )

Such hyperbole and sensationalism is to be expected from nukefree.org

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Such hyperbole and sensationalism is to be expected from nukefree.org

I agree in some respects, but just this line.....

The cloud would at very least permanently destroy much of the region on which most Americans rely for their winter supply of fresh vegetables.

That may be America's Winter supply, but how much of that food goes other places ? I don't know shit about Japan, but I do know that land use is always at a premium there. Watching that Tsunami role over miles of farm land, I can only guess the food supply grown there is very important to the Japanese people. How much radiation does it take for that land to become useless for generations ? What if that happened to the farm land and water supply just in central California ? It's my understanding that a couple of those reactors were built on fault lines they didn't even know were there.

Maybe it's time this country stopped looking at Yellowstone as a natural beauty, and started viewing it for what it really is.....the biggest source of geo-thermal power in the world. If Canada can destroy mountains for oil shale, it might be time for this country to start tapping some mud pots and geysers.

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Such hyperbole and sensationalism is to be expected from nukefree.org

Some people never learn even in the face of PURE FACTUAL EVENTS.....this is NO joke...don't ignore the no - nukers:)

Edited by spidersandsnakes

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I agree in some respects, but just this line.....

That may be America's Winter supply, but how much of that food goes other places ? I don't know shit about Japan, but I do know that land use is always at a premium there. Watching that Tsunami role over miles of farm land, I can only guess the food supply grown there is very important to the Japanese people. How much radiation does it take for that land to become useless for generations ? What if that happened to the farm land and water supply just in central California ? It's my understanding that a couple of those reactors were built on fault lines they didn't even know were there.

Maybe it's time this country stopped looking at Yellowstone as a natural beauty, and started viewing it for what it really is.....the biggest source of geo-thermal power in the world. If Canada can destroy mountains for oil shale, it might be time for this country to start tapping some mud pots and geysers.

We gotta keep on keepin' our fingers well crossed!!!!!

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Ring of Fire?????! The shape of things to come???!

An earthquake's likelihood depends on where the earth's plates move most actively. In the ring of fire, there are also hot spots over which the plates move. When the earth's molten magma bursts through the surface, that releases pressure that has built inside the earth. Changes in pressure can trigger an earthquake in nearby faults as the earth adjusts. San Francisco is one area that is seismically active, but there are others that we watch, such as Mount Saint Helens, Alaska, and the Yellowstone caldera. Volcanoes are currently active in Hawaii and southern Japan. Barrow and Deadhorse, Alaska are showing some spikes in geomagnetic activity today.

pubs.usgs.gov Ring of Fire

usgs.gov Japan earthquake, Hawaii volcano

geomag.usgs.gov Today's geomagnetic activity in the United States

Edited by Silver Rider

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An earthquake's likelihood depends on where the earth's plates move most actively. In the ring of fire, there are also hot spots over which the plates move. When the earth's molten magma bursts through the surface, that releases pressure that has built inside the earth. Changes in pressure can trigger an earthquake in nearby faults as the earth adjusts. San Francisco is one area that is seismically active, but there are others that we watch, such as Mount Saint Helens, Alaska, and the Yellowstone caldera.

All of Cascadia is long overdue for a big quake. We've seen the damage a relatively smaller quake can do in places like San Francisco, LA and Seattle. Not sure what anyone can do about it though. Don't think worrying about it is going to help but being as prepared as one can be is definitely the smartest move.

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All of Cascadia is long overdue for a big quake.

When Juan de Fuca speaks everyone will listen.

:unsure:

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I can't stand how our dictionary and word meanings have changed over time.

The word conservative used to mean just that. Conservatives sure are liberal with their exploitation of things that can destroy quality of life, worldwide. Let's see, what would the word nature mean to them ?

manmade, synthesized....manipulated ?

We can't control nature, but these words above give crumbling power to those who think they can. It's about domination, OVERcoming natural phenomena, CONTROL. IT ain't gonna happen. Humility isn't a trait amongst these types.

FULL BORE ON THE PEDAL !!!

In spite....yes IN SPITE of it all !

Air, Fire, Water and Earth, all contaminated because of the boorish, power hungry conservatives who defile nature. Earth gets her's in the end and will be here long after the human race is decimated.

It's not China that's the Sleeping Giant.

Edited by porkchop

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I have literally been glued to CNN for 6 days and today this man was crying because he lost his entire family, then I just broke down watching this man hurt and seeing the pain he was going through.

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Some people never learn even in the face of PURE FACTUAL EVENTS.....this is NO joke...don't ignore the no - nukers:)

The factual event and agenda-driven nuke free.org hypothesis are separate things. I don't ignore THE FACTS, seeing as I actually live here. Hate me, fry me, bake me, try me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0HLMXCX9F0&feature=related

For Kumiko, and for Japan:

Edited by SteveAJones

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So, my daughter's 8th grade class is having a Fund Raiser for Japan. Our best to those suffering. "Mom, is nuclear power bad"? Oh good, an easy question!;)

She also knew that March 14th was National Pi Day. Some neird Math thing...

Momma is soo proud.

Edited by planted

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So, my daughter's 8th grade class is having a Fund Raiser for Japan. Our best to those suffering. "Mom, is nuclear power bad"? Oh good, an easy question!;)

She also knew that March 14th was National Pie Day. Some weird Math thing...

Momma is soo proud.

That's very kind of them, and of you.

XO B)

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Search and rescue teams found some survivors, elementary students were reunited, and it snowed in northern Japan on Thursday. And that's the good news.

I'm sad to see people lose loved ones. I hope everyone is going to be alright, even with so much loss.

msnbc.msn.com Photo Gallery

Day 7, Photo 1 - A gas station worker talks to fuel-seeking drivers who stayed overnight in front of the station despite a sold-out notice in Ichinoseki, northern Japan early Thursday, March 17.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Day 7, Photo 3 - A passenger from Haneda, Japan, passes radiation check devices after arriving at Incheon International airport in Incheon, South Korea on Thursday.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Day 7, Photo 5 - Students react as they are reunited at an elementary school in Ofunato on Thursday

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Day 6, Photo 16 - A Mexican Red Cross member, center, points toward a body found by a sniffer dog to French firemen during a search operation in Sendai on March 16.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Day 5, Photo 10 - A member of a British search and rescue team searches for trapped survivors in the cab of a truck bowled over by the tsunami in Ofunato, on Tuesday. Two search and rescue teams from the U.S. and a team from the U.K. with combined numbers of around 220 personnel, searched for trapped survivors.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Day 5, Photo 14 - U.S. rescue team sniffer dog from Virginia searches the wreckage of a house during rescue operations in the city of Ofunato, Iwate prefecture.

The depth of the crisis was underlined yesterday in a rare TV appearance by Emperor Akihito, who said he was "deeply concerned" by the tragedy enveloping his country. "I hope from the bottom of my heart that the people will, hand in hand, treat each other with compassion and overcome these difficult times," he said.

U.S officials recommended the evacuation of any American within 50 miles (80 kilometers) of the Fukushima site. Japanese officials have recommended that people within 20 miles (30 kilometers) stay indoors, and evacuate within 12 miles (20 kilometers.)

"We do not have all the details of the information, so what we can do is limited," said Yukiya Amano, who is Japanese himself. "I am trying to further improve the communication." The UK government was sufficiently alarmed by the situation, especially the radioactive leaks, that the Foreign and Commonwealth Office announced: "British nationals currently in Tokyo and to the north of Tokyo should consider leaving the area."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The shortage of supplies has not triggered panic. People queuing to get into the few shops that are open do so calmly and efficiently, even though the line could wait for more than an hour. Many of the shops have employed officials with flags to direct the queues.

"I had to get in line for an hour. Then there was no milk, no bread. People were allowed two snacks each and one tin of food," said Tsugitaka Chiba. "In my neighbourhood, people have been giving food away. There's just no information about the resupply of the shops."

centurylink.net

independent.co.uk

independent.co.uk/news

Edited by Silver Rider

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When Juan de Fuca speaks everyone will listen.

:unsure:

So true !

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The factual event and agenda-driven nuke free.org hypothesis are separate things. I don't ignore THE FACTS, seeing as I actually live here. Hate me, fry me, bake me, try me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0HLMXCX9F0&feature=related

For Kumiko, and for Japan:

Indeed you shouldn't ignore the FACTS coz the rest of the globe AIN'T!!!!!!!!

Edited by spidersandsnakes

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