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JIMMY PAGE ON THIS DAY (Archive)


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What is apparent from these fascinating Day in the Life of Jimmy Page pages is either Jimmy is an historian/archivist of hitherto unrealised magnificent proportions, or all these years he has employed (or tasked) an assistant to undertake the endeavour on his behalf. The cheque from the BBC sessions is must be the apex of archivist "attention to detail" !!

Cheers,

Indi

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The complete concert has been around for quite some time.

I think the other rock and roll numbers he is referring to are Sunshine Woman from 1969 and

That's All Right Mama, which he edited out of the WLL medley. Everything except for Sunshine Woman, CB on jp.com and a second version of WIAWSNB from 1969, has been released officially.

Was there an actual Sunshine Woman played at the sessions or are you referring to the one on the Maida Vale tape..

post-15438-0-30569500-1315747295_thumb.j

Edited by TheStairwayRemainsTheSame
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"Led Zeppelin announced 'THEY' were to play the 02"

I don't make much of an effort to speak of myself in the third person..

I questioned that aswell, we would have been a better choice

Also he should stop doubling up on facts like he has here so he has much more for future year's On This Day

Edited by TheStairwayRemainsTheSame
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You never know, Jimmy has lived a very full life - he has a wealth of experience to share (if he chooses, for however long he chooses). Let us dig it while we can.

I can't get over those ticket prices for the Berkeley show - $3.50! That's barely $20 in 2011 dollars. People back then didn't know how good they had it.

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Wow, surprised no one did tomorrow yet!:P

9/13/11

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It's funny how I was accused by some of not being able to accept criticism of my singing on this forum, while I was just discussing and trying to become better,

because while all the reasons Jimmy stated in the article why the crowd didn't appreciate them too much are certainly true and he could also base his thinking on the fact they had great response everywhere else and it's hard to believe, especially for us fans that Zeppelin wouldn't get a good response absolutely everywhere, but someone could still accuse him of not being able too accept, that you just can't be received well everywhere!

Now, I don't think he has that problem, but some could easily accuse him of that, based on the article and no one could really accuse such a person of just making it up, because the article could truly indicate that, but I really don't think Jimmy is narcissistic, based on the intervies I read, but who knows unless someone who knows Jimmy personally clears it!

Rock on,

Samo Kodela

Edited by Matjaz1
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Oakland Tribune

September 22, 1971

"Led Zeppelin Bows In with a Roar"

Led Zeppelin, tabbed a super group by many rock critics, proved itself only to be loud, boisterous and very deafening at their first Bay Area appearance in over a year last week, filling the Berkeley Community Theater with some 40 amplifiers and speakers.

The concert, which started 20 minutes late, began with the barely recognizable 'Immigrant Song," with Page improvising to the hilt throughout the number and Plant dancing around onstage spastic-ally to the tune. "Since I've Been Loving You," was moving, dramatic and gutsy, but absolutely too loud and so was"Black Dog,"' judged its sound projection because its effect was almost unbelievable, and often unbearable.

It is well known thatLed Zeppelin is a talented group. Jimmy Page is without a doubt one of the best guitarists in the musical world, John Bonham is a great drummer, bassist John Paul Jones is an above-average performer and Robert Plant, well, he has been called a male Janis Joplin.

Their mystic and haunting "Dazed and Confused" was improved by Page and his guitar. Zeppelin's' 'Celebration Day," a hard, driving number that was unbelievably loud, shook the auditorium and the people in it. A quiet and peaceful interlude where the group sat down and performed a couple of tunes including the lyrical and soothing (to the ear) "Going to California" almost saved the evening. They played acoustic guitar, but even that was plugged in.

John Bonham, the drummer in the group, presented one of the most phenomenal drum solos this reporter has ever witnessed. The half-hour solo had the crowd in afrenzy and they roared its approval until his conclusion. From then on, the crowd stood until the end of the performance, apparently hypnotized by the music, and danced to "Whole Lotta Love". It was a fast moving tune, interspersed with oldies but goodies like Rick Nelson's old hit, "Hello Mary Lou."

When called back for an encore, they went into "Been a Long Time," also from their upcoming album and again blasted the audience out of the auditorium, ears ringing with the tunes of Led Zeppelin, probably the loudest group to come out of England.

Doris G. Worsham

Edited by SteveAJones
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Jimmy had last seen Ronnie three years prior, having left four tickets for him to attend The Firm's concert in Houston on March 21, 1985. They spent the next day (Mar 22nd) together at Ronnie's apartment as Ronnie resided in Houston (not Austin). From '85 onward Jimmy called Ronnie every April to wish him a happy birthday.

Edited by SteveAJones
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Jimmy had last seen Ronnie three years prior, having left four tickets for him to attend The Firm's concert in Houston on March 21, 1985. They spent the next day (Mar 22nd) together at Ronnie's apartment as Ronnie resided in Houston (not Austin). From '85 onward Jimmy called Ronnie every April to wish him a happy birthday.

Just a quick note to say I appreciate all the things you have done to keep the Ronnie story alive....your accounts are accurate and you have definitely helped to keep Ronnie's memory and his friendship with JP alive.... I was STUNNED to see the JP entry today with my photo and my name and Bucks listed! I still keep in touch with him frequently....

Thanks, man!

Mark Bowman

Austin, TX

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Oakland Tribune

September 22, 1971

"Led Zeppelin Bows In with a Roar"

Led Zeppelin, tabbed a super group by many rock critics, proved itself only to be loud, boisterous and very deafening at their first Bay Area appearance in over a year last week, filling the Berkeley Community Theater with some 40 amplifiers and speakers.

The concert, which started 20 minutes late, began with the barely recognizable 'Immigrant Song," with Page improvising to the hilt throughout the number and Plant dancing around onstage spastic-ally to the tune. "Since I've Been Loving You," was moving, dramatic and gutsy, but absolutely too loud and so was"Black Dog,"' judged its sound projection because its effect was almost unbelievable, and often unbearable.

It is well known thatLed Zeppelin is a talented group. Jimmy Page is without a doubt one of the best guitarists in the musical world, John Bonham is a great drummer, bassist John Paul Jones is an above-average performer and Robert Plant, well, he has been called a male Janis Joplin.

Their mystic and haunting "Dazed and Confused" was improved by Page and his guitar. Zeppelin's' 'Celebration Day," a hard, driving number that was unbelievably loud, shook the auditorium and the people in it. A quiet and peaceful interlude where the group sat down and performed a couple of tunes including the lyrical and soothing (to the ear) "Going to California" almost saved the evening. They played acoustic guitar, but even that was plugged in.

John Bonham, the drummer in the group, presented one of the most phenomenal drum solos this reporter has ever witnessed. The half-hour solo had the crowd in afrenzy and they roared its approval until his conclusion. From then on, the crowd stood until the end of the performance, apparently hypnotized by the music, and danced to "Whole Lotta Love". It was a fast moving tune, interspersed with oldies but goodies like Rick Nelson's old hit, "Hello Mary Lou."

When called back for an encore, they went into "Been a Long Time," also from their upcoming album and again blasted the audience out of the auditorium, ears ringing with the tunes of Led Zeppelin, probably the loudest group to come out of England.

Doris G. Worsham

He, he yeah, obviously they got a good response, I knew Jimmy must have been wrong some way! :D;):P

Edited by Matjaz1
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Just a quick note to say I appreciate all the things you have done to keep the Ronnie story alive....your accounts are accurate and you have definitely helped to keep Ronnie's memory and his friendship with JP alive.... I was STUNNED to see the JP entry today with my photo and my name and Bucks listed! I still keep in touch with him frequently....

Thanks, man!

Mark Bowman

Austin, TX

Thank you for your correspondence, Mark! Here is Buck's fond recollection of Jimmy & Ronnie's first meeting since the triumphant 1983 ARMS tour, written some years ago:

JIMMY PAGE: First Meeting, Houston 1985

By James "Bucks" Burnett

I am proud to be able to say that I am friends with a person as fine and amazingly creative as Jimmy Page. Anyway I was living with Faces bassist Ronnie Lane as his butler and personal assistant in early 1985.

Jimmy came through Houston with his new band The Firm, and Ronnie and I went to the concert with our new friend Mark Bowman. Jimmy had 4 seats reserved for us on the stage behind a bank of speakers, so we watched his entire performance from about 10 feet away. Yes, I took a camera. He sought out Ronnie backstage and suggested he come visit the following night at our apartment, which he did.

My first words to him were, "Good evening Mr. Page, please come in, Mr. Lane is expecting you. My name is James." He snorted and said, "Yeah, mine too..." This began a friendship which has lasted over 20 years. We spent several hours together that evening, during which I spent most of the time listening to the two of them visit while occasionally injecting something pointless with a sporty posh accent. When I finally cracked him up, he spewed his drink and exclaimed to Ronnie, "Where'd ya get HIM?!?" Ronnie just grinned and said, "He's my butler. Ain't he great?" This was on or about March 21, 1985.

I will have many stories about Pagey but you must remember his privacy must be honored at all times, so don't expect any great revelations here. He is absolutely genius-level smart in fields other than music, and funny beyond belief, qualities which may not be readily apparent in his public life, so it's been wonderful to enjoy those aspects of his personality. He's no angel but he's known a few and settled on one.

She herself is another story for another time.

-------------

SAJ notes: On Sunday, September 25, 1988 Jimmy visited his friend James Burnett at his record store, 14 Records, in Denton, TX. James Burnett recently opened an eight-track museum, details of which can be found here:

http://blogs.dallaso...cks_burnett.php

Edited by SteveAJones
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It's funny how I was accused by some of not being able to accept criticism of my singing on this forum, while I was just discussing and trying to become better,

Samo Kodela

No, Samo - you couldn't accept criticism and actually accused us, as Zeppelin fans, of being angry and threatened because you could sing the songs better than Robert Plant could. Sorry pal, but you can't re-write history.

And how you can connect that to Jimmy Page talking about the reception that Led Zeppelin received is a bit beyond my understanding. :huh:

Still - Rock On!

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No, Samo - you couldn't accept criticism and actually accused us, as Zeppelin fans, of being angry and threatened because you could sing the songs better than Robert Plant could. Sorry pal, but you can't re-write history.

And how you can connect that to Jimmy Page talking about the reception that Led Zeppelin received is a bit beyond my understanding. :huh:

Still - Rock On!

NO WAY! I never said I could sing those songs better then Robert Plant and I could accept criticism, but I was just discussing, because I thought I should discuss it even if I didn't sing as good as I do now, which I sadly didn't notice that much at the time and my opinon is, that if you don't take criticism quietly and start to discuss with a reason to improve your singing and also because you find that many people's opinions have no solid ground,

I just don't think there is anything wrong with that and I connected it to Jimmy, because his reasons of bad reception could aswell show a slight disability of accepting that you won't be adored everywhere and that some critics might not like you, but I don't think that is true with Jimmy and it is also not true with me and also we all know, that most of the critics that criticised Zeppelin were indeed wrong, time has shown that, but I really don't want to get into disscusion who was wrong or right about my singing!

I don't want to discuss my singing and I won't, I just mentioned it in relation to this topic! So back to topic!

Edited by Matjaz1
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