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This is from an article posted on the Buzzfeed website called 40 of the Most Powerful Photographs Ever Taken

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A French civilian cries in despair as Nazis occupy Paris during World War II.

Via: iconicphotos.wordpress.com

Yeah, that's a classic. My hatred for the Nazi's will never diminish.

Mt. Rainier last week with a lenticular cloud on top.

post-503-0-55069500-1339114553.jpg

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I love the colouring in this shot.

Thanks Bingo. I did some editing to darken the sky and mute the colours (except for the red traffic lights). Am just learning to use Photoshop, but I must admit, it feels a bit like cheating...

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STOP that thought right now!!! Photographs have been manipulated since day one....you think Ansel Adams didn't manipulate in the dark room? ALL photographers manipulate their photos. PLUS, that's the second artistic side of a photograph, you can change that one photograph a million ways, dark sky, heavy colour, light sky, just one colour, blown out features, etc. etc. etc.

Be proud of how you want your photograph to become.

BUT, i know how you feel...I felt the same way in the beginning until you realize that's the beauty of art.

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...and on the flip side, there will be many photographs you like just the way they're shot. The only person you have to please is yourself....just like music, do what you do and people will like your work for YOUR input. :D

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Thanks Bingo. I did some editing to darken the sky and mute the colours (except for the red traffic lights). Am just learning to use Photoshop, but I must admit, it feels a bit like cheating...

As Bingo said post shot manipulation has taken place since the 19th century, espeically landscape shots where you often dealing with massive differences in light thoughout the frame, The process today is perhaps easier than it was in the darkroom and offers more options but the key as with the pics themselves is good taste. The internet is full of terrible photoshoped pics featuring gimmicks like spot colour but your pic useses a similar process in a far more subtle and taseful way.

B&W espeically has always been massive influenced by post processing, very rarely do I find an in camera shot is as effective as one created afterwards.

img7792bws.jpg

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As Bingo said post shot manipulation has taken place since the 19th century

Thanks Bingo and Greenman! Didn't realize this is just the way its done. I just assumed that people waited for the right lighting, adjusted their settings, maybe used a filter and that was it. I feel less bad about photoshop now!

I have to say, it is alot of fun to have so much control over your photos.

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Thanks Bingo and Greenman! Didn't realize this is just the way its done. I just assumed that people waited for the right lighting, adjusted their settings, maybe used a filter and that was it. I feel less bad about photoshop now!

I have to say, it is alot of fun to have so much control over your photos.

Photographers have always done all of those things, its always better to get as close to the final shot as you can in camera but that doesnt mean they didnt also use the darkroom to improve them afterwards, use every tool you can get to the best final result IMHO.

The real skill with photoshop is I'd say learning to edit in a naturalistic fashion so people cannot tell you've even do so. Anyone can just crank the saturation and contrast up across the entire pic massively and the results will generally look very garish and fake.

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Edited by greenman
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Is someone from the NY Daily News a Led Head? Are they reading this forum? lol......Perfectly timed article on what we were just discussing.

http://www.nydailyne...ticle-1.1092552

Thanks for posting as that's a very cool article but when I refer to using Photoshop on photographs I meant more in a sense of using it as a digital darkroom rather than radically altering the images themselves.

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I'm referring to basically doing the same thing with Photoshop that you would be able to do in an actual darkroom. In the case of developing film in a darkroom, it's not something you're doing to manipulate a photograph after the fact, it's something you're doing as the film actually develops. Using Photoshop just gives you more control. Neither method is meant to make up for incompetency on the part of the photographer or to make the photo perfect. Recently in this thread I posted some photos from guy who uses a toy film camera to take photos. He uses Photoshop but he doesn't use it to do anything that he couldn't also do in a wet darkroom. The photographer is Michael Bryant, the type of camera he uses is a Holga. In the event that you're interested, here's a link to his website where he explains his method. Here's a couple of his photos that I didn't post previously:

H108LG.jpgH34_LG.jpg

Edited by Jahfin
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