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Elderly and handicapped people aside, and even despite the "just another bad storm theory"; it still doesn't explain the break down in civil order the way it did. When the FBI did a report on the crimes associated with Katrina in New Orleans, they concluded that the main reason why most of the residents who didn't evacuate when given the order stayed, had more to do with either not wanting to leave their homes and their "stuff" unprotected from looters; or because they wanted to take part in looting all the "free stuff" for themselves. Dealing with the rain and water had much less to do with the mentality in play.

New Orleans and this part of Louisiana in general has always per capita been at the top of list in regard to many social ills. Leads the nation in high school drop out rates, generational welfare, teenage pregnancies, childhood obesity, obesity in general, murder, rape and all manner of crimes.

It's not that I have anything against New Orleans, I just don't see where there is much there to be very proud of in my opinion. And not that I don't have similar opinions about parts of Chicago, NYC San Francisco, Los Angeles and Miami. However, with those cities there are also MANY examples where there are positive offsets to the negative parts of the culture. I'm just trying hard to see the same in terms of New Orleans, and a few sporacic music videos posted is not convincing me.

I suppose people will always want to try and find a way to be proud of where they are from, even people in Mogadishu probably have some cute videos they would post in a thread about Somalia.

I pity you and your ignorance...

Edited by Rock Historian
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Yes, it is. It's various artists, I included a link to the tracklisting in my previous post.

Thanks for that. Jaf, have you ever made trip here recently or ever? Jazz Fest is something to experience once in a lifetime..you'd enjoy it for all it's worth and the food as well. Although, it;s a bit pricey - (I've only been three times) it's just a suggestion.

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My first contribution to this thread may seem trivial, as I used to participate in a very large software convention in New Orleans, this took place on a yearly basis starting in 1998.

The event was so huge that hotels in Downtown New Orleans were completely booked, hordes of visitors from all over the world strolling around the Aquarium, Jackson Square and Bourbon Street.

The first time I visited I was fascinated: the place seemed very European, like no other American City, I used to spend hours around Jackson Square, and there was a large coffee shop where the specialty was some pastry called ¨beigne¨.

I said this would be banal because in one occasion they had overbooked the hotel where we were staying, in compensation the hotel management allocated me the last empty room in the property which turned out to be the master suite.

It is (it was) the sort of accommodation that is booked by dignataries and diplomats, it had several bedrooms (like three or four) each with different forniture, colours and design. There was also one or two living rooms, and maybe a kitchen and a dining room, the place was so inmense that I could barely maintain activity in one room, and I wasn´t even that important.

The last time I visited was 2000 and slowly I lost memory of the many places and sights with which I had become familiar during all those trips. (In my mind it´s difficult to reconstruct Jackson Square many years later, although I see a horseman statue and the big cathedral dominating the skyline).

There´s also flashes of the bustling nightlife, the bars, the cafés and the nightclubs, it was probably in those days that I was first exposed to tunes such as ¨What I like about you¨ by The Romantics and ¨When the Saints go marching in’”, which is a traditional jazz song.

I made several day trips around New Orleans where I learnt about the French and Spanish heritage of the region, there´s also the influence of the Canadian émigrés who settled there. I’ll discuss more of this in future posts.

Right now I would like to close this by saying that the last two R.E.M. albums, Accelerate and Collapse into Now, helped me to reconnect, emotionally, with New Orleans after Katrina, because I think that the hurricane marked a before and after for the city (just like the terrorists attacks are a watershed for New York City).

In Accelerate, R.E.M. make a direct reference to Hurricane Katrina:

¨If the storm doesn´t kill me the government will¨

Then in Collapse into Now, after Obama had been elected they say:

¨The storm didn´t kill me, the government changed¨.

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I haven't visited the USA for many years and have never been to NO. I suppose the closest I've got was Bourbon Street (or whatever it's called) at Eurodisney, in France. I have to admit I have a soft spot for Cajun music, although I find it rather unpalatable that most of it is sung in French. Isn't it bizarre (and infuriating) how the French seem to turn up in the most unexpected of places? Some random city in the deep south...Canada...and that outpost on the river in the director's cut version of Apocalypse Now...like, WTF? I mean, I know that part was featured in Conrad's original story which the movie was partly based on, but it completely destroyed the menacing ramp-up as they approached Kurtz's lair. I wish I had some fancy software to edit that scene out.

Not so keen on the local cuisine, though. I bought a ready-made jambalaya from my local supermarket a few years back, and was very unimpressed. I mean, it was edible, but dreadfully bland...it reminded me of a poor man's paella, to be honest. So then I thought, maybe a traditional home-cooked jambalaya would be better, so I found a recipe online that purported to be an authentic version, as served in NO by a successful local restaurateur. But that wasn't so hot either. So it's odd, because French cuisine isn't usually too bad..

Are there any other traditional NO/ Louisiana dishes anyone could recommend?

Major, there are plenty of dishes I can recommend, and my wife would be able to tell you better than I, which ones you could possibly make yourself with the proper ingredience. I never claimed to be a good cook, nor do I try. The closest I get to cooking anything is making cereal in the morning...I put just enough milk in the bowl. I can cook the hell out of some Lucky Charms.....But New Orleans style Beans and Rice, Jambalaya, baked macaroni, muffalettas, Po' boy's, Gumbo, Shrimp Etouffee. I can go on. You see, the main complaint/problem you find is that these recipes are never done right, when tasted outside the local area. So what you think should taste a ceratin way, never turns out right. When I hear of people that go up North (like to Maine or something) and try these famous New Orleans dishes, most of the time it's a dissappointment. Im a firm believer that when you travel-eat what is popular for that city or place you are visiting. Usually you will get good results when you eat the food that is common with the town.

We have a bunch of good Southern New Orleans cookbooks here at my home. I can send you a recipe anytime (PM it too you, or otherwise) Maybe Deb can send you a few as I am about to head off into the great unknown to a wonderful place called Rome that calls my name. We leave at 4:30 am, so I'll get packing up soon. Have a great Christmas and New Years everyone-see yall in 2012-until then, keep it real. Catch up with ya'll in a few weeks!!!!!!!!! :flying:

Edited by Rock Historian
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Po Boys of any kind, But you have to have the right french bread to even begin and you can only get that from New Orleans. Muffaletta (video below)

Jambalaya you must make with fresh ingredients, just like Gumbo. Mr B's Bistro has one of the best crawfish omlettes and

Etouffee

Red Beans and Rice, Camillia Grille makes the best omelets, but if you want a Crawfish omelet then Mr B's Bistro has one of the best. Mothers has the best Ham you will ever taste, Creole jambalaya, turtle soup, Duck a l'Orange, and Shrimp Etouffee. There is just to many to mention honestly

BBQ Shrimp, Broiled Crawfish and or Shrimp, Fried Catfish, Fried Gator, Fried Turkey...... You can pull up a lot of videos on food from New Orleans on You Tube...and desserts don't even get me started!!!

Jockamo's for jambalaya, Acme Oyster house for the best oysters on the half shell.....I haven't even barely touched the surface!!!

^^Hi RH, we must have been posting at the same time....LOL!!!! :-)

Edit: Oh Hell, Blackened Cajun catfish or anything blackened that swims!!!! Honestly our food is BEYOND delicious:-)

Edit again: Justin Wilson, you should pull up some of his videos!!..

forgot to mention Dirty Rice and Red Snapper, Crab Boil, Crab Cakes, Soft Shell Crabs....

Edit again: Well now, I must go make the following: Take a little butter and a banana that is perfectly ripe, cut the entire banana in half, saute in the butter for about 45 seconds on each side, put on the plate and add a little chocolate sauce..easy to make and freakin make your taste buds dance!!!

Edited by Deborah J
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If you decide to visit, it would be great for a few of us to get together :party:

That would be fun ! Have my son's wedding in June so it would probably have to be after that

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Jahfin , Thanks for this, I do not have it but will now start the search to buy this!!! ;)

Please let me know what you think, I believe you'll enjoy it.

Anyone familiar with "The Sauce Boss", Bill Wharton? He combines the best of both worlds by bringing music and cooking together onstage. Enjoy!

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Not like that was planned or anything. ;)

I spent a lot of time up and down the Gulf Coast, starting in March 2006. The utter devastation that I witnessed in Biloxi was nothing that I had ever seen before. It was if it had been wiped off the face of the earth. Driving back west on I-10 through Slidell and eastern New Orleans was like something that can be described as the mixture of a war zone and a foreign planet. Miles and miles and miles of deserted properties.

It was completely humbling to say the very least. Never had a beignet and a cafe au lait from Cafe Du Monde ever tasted so good. Since then, I think I've visited every location from the original location on Decatur to the location in Metairie.

My favorite visit was in 2009, when the missus and spent a week there, soaking up the sights, sounds and flavors on New Orleans. I think you could visit for a month and not be able to experience 1% of all what New Orleans has to offer.

We also went up Highway 90 to her hometown to Thibodaux and spent some time with her extended family. Talk about culture shock to me, however something that I will never forget.

Here's one song that reminds me of the whole experience and the whole Cajun culture

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Please let me know what you think, I believe you'll enjoy it.

Anyone familiar with "The Sauce Boss", Bill Wharton? He combines the best of both worlds by bringing music and cooking together onstage. Enjoy!

Jahfin, that was great!!! Gives a new meaning to Four Sticks:-) I'll check out his other video's as well. THANKS!!!!

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Not like that was planned or anything. ;)

I spent a lot of time up and down the Gulf Coast, starting in March 2006. The utter devastation that I witnessed in Biloxi was nothing that I had ever seen before. It was if it had been wiped off the face of the earth. Driving back west on I-10 through Slidell and eastern New Orleans was like something that can be described as the mixture of a war zone and a foreign planet. Miles and miles and miles of deserted properties.

It was completely humbling to say the very least. Never had a beignet and a cafe au lait from Cafe Du Monde ever tasted so good. Since then, I think I've visited every location from the original location on Decatur to the location in Metairie.

My favorite visit was in 2009, when the missus and spent a week there, soaking up the sights, sounds and flavors on New Orleans. I think you could visit for a month and not be able to experience 1% of all what New Orleans has to offer.

We also went up Highway 90 to her hometown to Thibodaux and spent some time with her extended family. Talk about culture shock to me, however something that I will never forget.

Here's one song that reminds me of the whole experience and the whole Cajun culture

I didn't know you had extended family from that area... I know when I came back after Katrina crossing the twin span (I-10) and one side was almost gone, then passing thru NO east to get to my house near the quarter I could not believe the devastation. Biloxi was just like you described. That area looked like a third world country.

I love that song by Jerry Reed and Hank Williams Jr. does a good version as well.

A few of us should plan a nice long weekend to get together. You know we would have a blast!! Eat, Party and visit all the LZ spots :party:

Jahfin, I have seen the radiators quite a few times:-)

Edited by Deborah J
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