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SuperDave

Celebration Day Movie - Forum Reviews

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a real great thing. i was at the gig but the filming and sound turned the whole thing into something

perfect.they put a lot of concentration into it and it paid out.in the cinema the volume

was too low but i guess this is something for our homesystems anywhere.

the balance between quiet and thunder tunes were perfect as the improvisations.

ok there were some bits of guitar or vocal faults but this in in the nature of improvising.

two young kids said it correctly at the end:they are often out of tune and time, but that

is the reason why the music is so fantastic.

i don´t think you can compare cd with tsrts -that i love.compare the important things you have done

40 years ago....i fear this is the last highlight for them now. but a great one !

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I am happy! WOW !!! I love the movie.

Roger

Three pictures from Berlin

Last photo Roger Berlin and Roberto (Strider571) from Friends of zep club

www.friendsofzep.de

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post-16453-0-66415000-1350545719_thumb.j

post-16453-0-74465500-1350545801_thumb.j

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Love the show! Zep were on fine form. Plant sounded very good concerning he can't sing like he used to. Jimmy seemed to be loving it. As ever JPJ was one half of the heart and soul of the band, providing awesome bass lines. And Jason, well the crowd took him to their hearts. He was monstrous in Rock n Roll :)

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Love the show! Zep were on fine form. Plant sounded very good concerning he can't sing like he used to. Jimmy seemed to be loving it. As ever JPJ was one half of the heart and soul of the band, providing awesome bass lines. And Jason, well the crowd took him to their hearts. He was monstrous in Rock n Roll smile.png

Yes, it is.

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I should have added that the cinema was about 80-90% capacity. No problems with sound - I was in the back row and the acoustics was okay. Before 'Celebration Day' when the curtain was still down, the cinema did play a selection of tracks from 'Mothership' which was quite enjoyable. They also played a preview of the Rolling Stones documentary 'Crossfire Hurricane' when the curtain was up, followed by a promo for the 'Celebration Day' Blu-Ray/DVD set, before the film kicked in.

I thought I recognised Deborah in the seats below mine, but I thought she was in Perth, so who knows.

Just got back from a screening.

Loved "For Your Life". Makes me wonder why they didn't play it for the 1977 US Tour or 1980 Over Europe. Very good.

Only two downsides:

Just like at the press conference when some Irish journalist made an off-topic question about Rory Gallagher, a "fan" held up their Irish flag so high it blocked some parts of the stage, from a frontal audience shot. Dick Carruthers did his best to find another camera angle quickly, but it was annoying.

I stayed back for the rolling credits hoping there might have been extras at the end but sadly no.

I normally don't go to the flicks that often preferring to watch Blu-Ray and DVDs in the comfort in the home, and I'm reminded why. The state of the cinema after the audience left was an embarrassing pig-sty - spilt drinks and half-eaten popcorn everywhere. A mess.

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I went along to a screening last night. It was at a small town cinema and was around two thirds full. There were lots of Zep heads that must have seen them in the '70s, as well an many younger viewers who seemed just as enthusiastic. I recognised a few students that I teach.

It's hard to convey in words how incredible I thought the film was. This may be the last thing Zeppelin ever do together, but it can also be regarded as a pinnacle of their career. Despite some initial sound issues that other members have posted about, by the time IMTOD kicked off the theatre was really rocking. They really nailed that song, everything was perfect, and when I closed my eyes for a moment I could have been at the O2 in 2007. Other highlights for me were No Quarter which has always been my favourite live song; the opening notes sent shivers down my spine. It was otherworldly, ethereal. NFBM was again superbly executed, and of course, Kashmir blew me and I think everyone else in the cinema away. When Robert sang the line, 'Let me take you there', I was there with him. It was truly monumental. I loved the look of concentration of John Paul Jone's face whilst playing it, looking over at Jason and Jimmy to check they were all in time together, and, of course, they were.

From the way it was shot, I got the impression that these were truly gifted musicians playing real live music. You could see and hear fingers on keys and strings and Jonesy's foot pedal on his keyboard going during Trampled Underfoot. This is how real live music should be played. The use of Super 8 cameras were used to great effect which gave the film a raw energy and almost bootleg feel in parts.

Jimmy seemed to be completely lost in his playing. Yes, there was some drooling that some members here have dreaded seeing on the big screen. To me this only reinforced the impression that this is a man who is at one with his instrument, and is completely absorbed in his playing. Like many musical genuises before him, remaining well groomed throughout a show is a peripheral concern; he was there to play Zeppelin and play it the best he could even it that meant sweating excessivley and a bit of drooling! I did notice one moment I think during the opening chords of Dazed and Confused where Jimmy played a note that was maybe too high or distorted more than he wanted it to be and he gave a glance to Jonesy that said 'oops!' - maybe it was a bit high or not quite in tune.

There was so much warmth generated in the smiles and pats on the back that were exchanged throughout the show that you could see they were relishing every moment. Visually there was so much to take in that multiple viewings will be required when the DVD is released.

Jason's drumming was consistently phenomenal. His error during Dazed and Confused was cleverly edited out without losing too much. Like his father before him, he was the powerhouse driving the rest of the band.

The general consensus amongst the audience from the comments I heard on my way out, and the appreciative applause when the film ended was that it was fantastic.

If this is, as it seems likely, Zeppelin's swansong, they couldn't have exited the world stage on a higher note.

Edited by Magic Fills the Air

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was great when everybody in the cinema stood up and cheered and applauded when it finished as if they were actually there on stage lol

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I went along to a screening last night. It was at a small town cinema and was around two thirds full. There were lots of Zep heads that must have seen them in the '70s, as well an many younger viewers who seemed just as enthusiastic. I recognised a few students that I teach.

It's hard to convey in words how incredible I thought the film was. This may be the last thing Zeppelin ever do together, but it can also be regarded as a pinnacle of their career. Despite some initial sound issues that other members have posted about, by the time IMTOD kicked off the theatre was really rocking. They really nailed that song, everything was perfect, and when I closed my eyes for a moment I could have been at the O2 in 2007. Other highlights for me were No Quarter which has always been my favourite live song; the opening notes sent shivers down my spine. It was otherworldly, ethereal. NFBM was again superbly executed, and of course, Kashmir blew me and I think everyone else in the cinema away. When Robert sang the line, 'Let me take you there', I was there with him. It was truly monumental. I loved the look of conetration of John Paul Jone's face whilst playing it, looking over at Jason and Jimmy to check they were all in time together, and, of course, they were.

From the way it was shot, I got the impression that these were truly gifted musicians playing real live music. You could see and hear fingers on keys and strings and Jonesy's foot pedal on his keyboard going during Trampled Underfoot. This is how real live music should be played. The use of Super 8 cameras were used to great effect which gave the film a raw energy and almost bootleg feel in parts.

Jimmy seemed to be completely lost in his playing. Yes, there was some drooling that some members here have dreaded seeing on the big screen. To me this only reinforced the impression that this is a man who is at one with his instrument, and is completely absorbed in his playing. Like many musical geniuses before him, remaining well groomed throughout a show is a peripheral concern; he was there to play Zeppelin and play it the best he could even it that meant sweating excessivley and a bit of drooling! I did notice one moment I think during the opening chords of Dazed and Confused where Jimmy played a note that was maybe too high or distorted more than he wanted it to be and he gave a glance to Jonesy that said 'oops!' - maybe it was a bit high or not quite in tune.

There was so much warmth generated in the smiles and pats on the back that were exchanged throughout the show that you could see they were relishing every moment. Visually there was so much to take it that multiple viewings will be required when the DVD is released.

Jason's drumming was consistently phenomenal. His error during Dazed and Confused was cleverly edited out without losing too much. Like his father before him, he was the powerhouse driving the rest of the band.

The general consensus amongst the audience from the comments I heard on my way out, and the appreciative applause when the film ended was that it was fantastic.

If this is, as it seems likely, Zeppelin's swansong, they couldn't have exited the world stage on a higher note.

Yes, it has been so.

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I have seen Celebration Day twice now and they definitely need to crank up the volume in the cinemas. It moved me just as much the second time as the first.

I was at the O2 but high up in the seats so couldn't see the band interactions like you can here.

The band were on fire throughout as most will agree.

I will make one point here though and that is to the many people on this and other forums who having seen the bootleg copies slated him a) for not touring with Zep and B) who believed that his heart wasn't into the show and used the fact that at the end he tosses his mike on the floor at the end demonstrated that he didn't care about the show and was going through the motions.

Well I hope now that they realise just how wrong they were, it is quite evident just how much Robert was into the show and the looks, smiles and moves between them all shown up close just dispels those misguided ideas.

Some of us challenged those views and were shot at and abused at times but I believe we have been proved right. Robert was at his imperious best.

This one show gives Zeppelin the legacy they deserve.

I don't believe any other band could have pulled something like the O2 show off as Zeppelin did.

How could you top that?

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The last time i saw Zep perform on stage was in 1979 at Knebworth.. I didnt know at the time that it was to be the last time. Last night i had a religious experience. AWSOME. What more can i say.

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As Ledded 1 said, Robert was extremely inspired on the night and his vocal range was outstanding ! IMO, the film is a honest time capsule of the band circa 2007 and judging by the reaction from the people who were in the theatre I was at last night, the bands legacy is well intact :thumbsup: . Very much looking forward to seeing it again on the 25th :)

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I saw it in Orland Park IL (near Chicago) and the theatre was about 90% full. It was a crappy cold rainy night I might add, and that could've held the crowd down a little. But the people that did show up were enthusiastic and applauding at the end of each song.

We had sound issues at our theatre as well, and around the 3rd song they kicked the volume up to a more acceptable level befitting a concert film. (I saw the Stones Some Girls Live in TX at the same theatre earlier this year and that was LOUD!)

But overall, after watching the finished product....Led Zeppelin are still Rock Gods. They pulled it off and sounded as great and powerful as ever. My personal favorites were Misty Mountain Hop, In My Time of Dying, Since I've Been Loving You, Kashmir and For Your Life.

P.S. I sat next to a woman at the theatre who said she saw Led Zeppelin the same tour I did in Chicago in '77 but she had front row seats...and said it was the greatest concert experience of her life.

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Oh yeah, I also wanted to add that Celebration Day is being released on my Birthday! So I already know how I'm spending my Birthday this year. I'll be getting the Led Out. While I don't have a big TV per se....I have the home theatre surround sound I have big sound. So I'll have to warn the neighbors.....It Might Get Loud! :D

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Saw it last night and walked home a Fool In the Rain.

Chief memories:

The four musicians were obviously enjoying themselves - lots of nods and smiles among them, which was nice to see. Jason Bonham seems a jolly sort.

Plant's snorting and toking gestures during "For Your Life" and "Misty Mountain Hop."

The modification of the lettering on Page's amplifiers - was he going to have an OR GE after the gig?

JPJ was always a great player and the band's anchor - you can really see him and Page making the music together - but he does look rather frail. I don't think the life of a touring rock star would do him much good nowadays.

Loved the white lines on the backing screen during "For Your Life." I get it.

Now I think I'll take a break. I've got so far into Led Zeppelin in the last few years I think I've come out the other side.

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did anyone else catch the credits at the end? jake holmes receives a credit for "inspiration" for "dazed and confused."

I would have preferred it, if Zeppelin had given John Homes credit for "inspiration". :drumz::D

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I already posted my review over at the Hotel, so appologies if you've already seen this:

"Well, first of all the big down point of the evening was the left hand side speakers cutting out for about half a minute at a time, at least five times during the film. Unforgivable.

Anyway, the movie itself...

We came home elated. My wife was driving and had asked me not to talk about it in the car, because she was so captivated by the concert that she was having a hard time concentrating on her driving. We got home, dispatched the baby sitter, craked open a bottle of wine & just sat & taked about the film for hours.

In fact, to me the fact that my wife (a non-musician) was so impressed by this was the highlight of the whole thing. This film comunicates to its audience, to normal music listeners, not just to Zep fanboy musos. We both felt like we had been to a gig, not to a cimema, such was the sheer adrenalne rush of the night. My wife has never heard or seen any of the boots, and I've been avoiding them ever since Celebration Day was anounced, so there was a freshness to the event, and I managed to watch it without any preconceived ideas of "I know what's coming". In fact, I will go so far as to say that it was like hearing it for the first time. The quality of the sound over the boots (as good & atmospheric as they are) made it seem "like the first time".

Visually, I can't say too much, because I'm in the middle of a series of operations on my eyes - to put that in context for you, the super8 footage didn't look too different to the rest of the film to me (I can see the aspect ratio of course, but the level of detail was similar to me). I thought the fast edits were a bit much, but not as bad as I had feared after reading some people's earlier reviews. The camera work seemed excellent, and I enjoyed seeing the smiles on their faces, and the body language of musicians communicating with each other. As we all know, they spent most of the night huddled together around the drum kit, as if it was a fire & they were trying to keep warm. They played like a real band, listening to each other, looking at each other, following each other & encouraging each other. Even my crappy eyesight could pick that out.

As a guitar geek it was nice to see the "army" so well. I was able to follow a fair bit of Page's pickup selector moves, but the puch pull pot was too subtle for me to see. (NB - if it was on SIBLY, as someone posted, then that was #2, not #1. icon_wink.gif ) I'll look forward to that on the DVD.

Musically, then? I thought they delivered better than any realistic expectation. Anyone who expected Plant to be able to sing like he was 21 would be disapointed. Anyone who expected Jason to be John would be disapointed. But those are not expectations based in reality. For three guys in their 60s, and one in early middle age, who aren't actually a band anymore, to be able to perform at that level was simply breath-taking. Bands just don't play like that anymore - listening, responding, nudging, joking. The display of interaction was superb. At least one moment that, on bootleg, had sounded like a mistake, was revealed to be deliberate & jokey - Page & Jones facing each other during Plant's harmonica solo in NFBM and teasing out a (spontaneaous?) stop/start playfulness, almost daring each other to stop playing altogether. Loved it.

The question has been raised as to whether any of these performances are the "definative" ones. I think that it's possible (and I say that with all due respect to JHB). For both me & my wife Trampled Underfoot simply shone. For her it was one of the highlights, for me it was the best I've ever heard that song. It's never been one of my favourites, but that night they nailed it. The observation about JPJ playing a major 3rd instead of a minor 3rd was an interesting one. To me he improved it. (YMMV)

FYL swung like anything. I love this song, and they seemed to get a real kick out of playing it. One of their funkiest, switching the beat around in true Zep fashion, this was an early highlight.

I have to pick out IMTOD - this, since the first bootleg, is my favourite performance of this song. The ES350 gives Page's lines a tone that the Danelectro never had, and adds a gutsiness, a raw blues feeling, that was never there before. Plant too has discovered some depth to his performance of this song. I guess that to sing "In my time of dying..." as a 60-something means something different than to sing it as a 20something. Zep have been criticised in the past for lacking real feeling - that their music isn't about anything but its own sound. At the O2 IMTOD set that straight.

SIBLY also contained a depth that once upon a time it didn't. Page has played it with a little Tea Foe One feel before, and he did here again. While the version in 1973 was all about flash, & instrumental prowess, in 2007 it sounded like he was feeling it.

NQ - JPJ's keyboard solo was superb. I wish he'd gone on longer, but they were clearly following the line that shorter solos would mean more songs, and who can argue with that.

D&C - loved Page's bow solo. In this trim form, with the visuals ("ooh - just like Knebworth" squeaked my wife) it was otherworldly. a reminder of Zeppelin's avant-garde side.

STH - I wasn't sure how I would respond to this song. On boot the downtuning had put me off. Here, in context, it worked for me. Someone said it had "gravitas" and melancholy. I think that's right. Unexpectedly moving.

Kashmir - simply "the Pride Of Zeppelin", as Planty once called it.

And finally, Jason. What a fecking star. To sit on that stool, knowing that his father had sat there before him, knowing that every Zep reunion before had failed, knowing that if this one failed he'd most likely get blamed by the public, knowing that half the fans out there thought he wasn't up to the job, knowing that every drummer in the world was watching him, ready to say "I could have done that better"...

...to sit there knowing all that, to feel all that presure, and to be able to function at all is simply more than most people could possibly hope to do.

To have faced all that and to have performed to the level that he did may just be the single greatest musical performance in rock. EVER.

To criticise what Jason did that night is like being handed the keys to paradise and complaning that the keys are heavy. Get a life."

Edited by huw

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Saw it yesterday in Washington DC at Landmark E Street Cinemas. Sound could have been louder. Crowd was great, singing along, cheering, clapping after each song. Lot of Zeppelin fans were there and probably people who saw them in the 1970's.

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