Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
JTM

New box sets including unreleased material

Recommended Posts

Any thoughts on when it comes time for the Coda release it will be the Coda to end all Coda's? The 3 releases coming in June are going to be great; but what if Jimmy's puts out a super deluxe Coda say 4 LP set with kitchen sink stuff from 1968 - 1980. I was really hoping LZI would have some of the outtakes that have been around on Bootleg for years; maybe it'll show up when the time for Coda comes round.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember reading there was a track called 'Slush'from the Houses sessions.True?Sorry if this has been mentioned elsewhere.

i've read before that Slush was the "working title" of The Rain Song. Granted, it could be wrong and i'd love to hear something a little different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've read before that Slush was the "working title" of The Rain Song. Granted, it could be wrong and i'd love to hear something a little different.

I always thought "Slush" was the original title of The Song Remains The Same, but I could be wrong. During the Japan '72 shows, (the latter) was referred to on at least one occasion as "The Campaign".

Edited by SuperDave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always thought "Slush" was the original title of The Song Remains The Same, but I could be wrong. During the Japan '72 shows, (the latter) was referred to on at least one occasion as "The Campaign".

"The Campaign" is the title of a 14cd box set by Tarantura of the 1972 Japanese tour. Incredible artwork too!

edit: Here's a link showing details of all the included cd concert dates, track listings and artwork.

http://www.lz-alphaomega.com/titles/1972/The_Campaign_1972.htm

Edited by Whoopie Cat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always thought "Slush" was the original title of The Song Remains The Same, but I could be wrong. During the Japan '72 shows, (the latter) was referred to on at least one occasion as "The Campaign".

"The Campaign" was the working title for TSRTS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The Campaign" was the working title for TSRTS.

Correct, according to Jimmy Page (1976).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From a commercial marketing point of view, an intelligent strategy would be to keep the choicest outtake tracks and put them on Coda, to incentivise people to buy it more than they would perhaps do otherwise. Then I'd load up the other albums with alternate versions of the original album tracks and full live concerts; be interesting to see if this happens.

Cheers,

Indi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember Page saying in an old guitar mag from the 70s that 'the Campaign'was the instrumental mid section of 'the Song Remains...'.Thanks for the info on 'Slush'although I was led to believe it was a separate track but then I could also be wrong!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard to say about lV and HOTH because the leftovers went on PG.The fast version of No Quarter should get on here somewhere as heard on the Stairway Sessions bootleg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

120 pages. I wonder how many more there'll be by the time I finish writing this message. He semi-jested.

Now, I don't know if this has been mentioned, but here's an observation about the extra tracks for the first album: I'm not too surprised that there are no studio outtakes, especially any with vocals. My reasoning is that Robert Plant is on record as being less than enthusiastic about his vocals for that album. Something about how he wishes he could delete all the "baby baby baby" hollerings, some of which are even more featured on the outtakes we've already heard (e.g. BIGLY).

Maybe an outtake instrumental might've been nice, but given the short amount of studio time/alt takes that are relevant, and that there was a chance to release a multitracked Paris '69 concert, well I for one will happily take the latter. It makes sense. That's how their name spread - the live shows. Shows the full power of a one-year old baby Zep. The kid is wild!

I'm looking forward to hearing the outtakes on II and III, but as an opening salvo in a long-arc plan of attack, the companion music on the first album seems a great statement to open proceedings.

Edited by Triplet Kick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who thinks we will get more than two discs with IV HOTH, and PG.

Jimmy has said each release will include a companion disc (singular) not discs (multiple).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was hoping someone on here could advise me. It was my intention to buy the 2 CD packs and then rip them to my mobile phone/laptop etc. That way, I would still get the accompanying CD booklets, and be able to display the CDs with the rest of my CD collection. However, I was wondering if I would get better sound reproduction by downloading the new remasters direct from ITunes.

Any help would be appreciated. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was hoping someone on here could advise me. It was my intention to buy the 2 CD packs and then rip them to my mobile phone/laptop etc. That way, I would still get the accompanying CD booklets, and be able to display the CDs with the rest of my CD collection. However, I was wondering if I would get better sound reproduction by downloading the new remasters direct from ITunes.

Any help would be appreciated. :)

My understanding is that iTunes AAC files are 256 KBPS. If you do your own rip, you can do it higher than that if you want. I don't think there's any argument to be made that the iTunes download would be sonically superior to the CD waves.

10 years ago when I was on the verge of purchasing my first iPod, a friend who does audio mastering for video production said 192 KBPS AAC is the sweet spot. Any higher and you're just taking up space and not gaining any sonic benefit.

But I share all of this with limited expertise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you so much for answering and sharing this information with me. I think I shall go ahead and pre-order the 2CD packs - I really want to have the accompanying booklets. If I hadn't sold my turntable years ago, I would have liked to have bought the Deluxe packages with the vinyl.

:drinks:

My understanding is that iTunes AAC files are 256 KBPS. If you do your own rip, you can do it higher than that if you want. I don't think there's any argument to be made that the iTunes download would be sonically superior to the CD waves.

10 years ago when I was on the verge of purchasing my first iPod, a friend who does audio mastering for video production said 192 KBPS AAC is the sweet spot. Any higher and you're just taking up space and not gaining any sonic benefit.

But I share all of this with limited expertise.

Edited by 1973fan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was hoping someone on here could advise me. It was my intention to buy the 2 CD packs and then rip them to my mobile phone/laptop etc. That way, I would still get the accompanying CD booklets, and be able to display the CDs with the rest of my CD collection. However, I was wondering if I would get better sound reproduction by downloading the new remasters direct from ITunes.

Any help would be appreciated. :)

My understanding is that iTunes AAC files are 256 KBPS. If you do your own rip, you can do it higher than that if you want. I don't think there's any argument to be made that the iTunes download would be sonically superior to the CD waves.

10 years ago when I was on the verge of purchasing my first iPod, a friend who does audio mastering for video production said 192 KBPS AAC is the sweet spot. Any higher and you're just taking up space and not gaining any sonic benefit.

But I share all of this with limited expertise.

Man, you guys have jumped headlong into a quagmire of issues...

CDs are manufactured (at least for the most part) using 16-bit, 44.1 kHz lossless audio -- iTunes uses a lossy compression similar to mp3. "Better" is subjective. Having compared the 2012 "Mastered for iTunes" tracks as well as the 2013 Qobuz lossless downloads -- which are the new remasters, without the companion tracks -- they are, for the most part, sonically identical, stemming from the same (re)mastering work done by John Davis. There is a slight audible difference between the two, because (as the names imply) the lossy audio looses some of the sonic information that the lossless audio preserves, but most people won't notice it. I don't notice it listening to the tracks individually, but when you subject them to some testing, you can isolate what the iTunes tracks "lose" in the conversion process.

Ultimately, it's a question of convenience, and whether or not you would prefer to have the (probably negligible) benefit of having audio that is more "complete" sonically. I store lossless audio on my iPhone because hard-drive space (or lack thereof) is no longer as much of a hindrance as it used to be.

Lossy conversion for personal listening is fine by me, but the danger going forward is people recording at lower bitrates and in lossy formats, and then converting that to a lower bitrate lossy format, and so on, and so on. Firsthand experience with some of the young people working with audio recording today -- and some of the horror stories you hear in the music industry itself -- really make it seem to me that it isn't an issue that's going away anytime soon.

Thank you so much for answering and sharing this information with me. I think I shall go ahead and pre-order the 2CD packs - I really want to have the accompanying booklets. If I hadn't sold my turntable years ago, I would have liked to have bought the Deluxe packages with the vinyl.

:drinks:

Plenty of turntables on the market now, for an inflated price. If you're interested in vinyl, I'd recommend picking up a player and some old LPs from flea markets -- my experiences have always been good.

Edited by Melcórë

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Melcore - thanks for this amazing contribution!!! I think I understand it :thumbsup: I'm going to go ahead with the 2cd packs because if nothing else, they'll look impressive on my CD shelf! I am hoping that the accompanying picture booklet has some 'never seen before' shots, but I think that is hoping for too much. Thanks.

Man, you guys have jumped headlong into a quagmire of issues...

CDs are manufactured (at least for the most part) using 16-bit, 44.1 kHz lossless audio -- iTunes uses a lossy compression similar to mp3. "Better" is subjective. Having compared the 2012 "Mastered for iTunes" tracks as well as the 2013 Qobuz lossless downloads -- which are the new remasters, without the companion tracks -- they are, for the most part, sonically identical, stemming from the same (re)mastering work done by John Davis. There is a slight audible difference between the two, because (as the names imply) the lossy audio looses some of the sonic information that the lossless audio preserves, but most people won't notice it. I don't notice it listening to the tracks individually, but when you subject them to some testing, you can isolate what the iTunes tracks "lose" in the conversion process.

Ultimately, it's a question of convenience, and whether or not you would prefer to have the (probably negligible) benefit of having audio that is more "complete" sonically. I store lossless audio on my iPhone because hard-drive space (or lack thereof) is no longer as much of a hindrance as it used to be.

Lossy conversion for personal listening is fine by me, but the danger going forward is people recording at lower bitrates and in lossy formats, and then converting that to a lower bitrate lossy format, and so on, and so on. Firsthand experience with some of the young people working with audio recording today -- and some of the horror stories you hear in the music industry itself -- really make it seem to me that it isn't an issue that's going away anytime soon.

Plenty of turntables on the market now, for an inflated price. If you're interested in vinyl, I'd recommend picking up a player and some old LPs from flea markets -- my experiences have always been good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Melcore - thanks for this amazing contribution!!! I think I understand it :thumbsup: I'm going to go ahead with the 2cd packs because if nothing else, they'll look impressive on my CD shelf! I am hoping that the accompanying picture booklet has some 'never seen before' shots, but I think that is hoping for too much. Thanks.

I'm an older guy from the vinyl generation, but I cannot fathom the need to decide between a download or a physical product. You can't re-sell a download, but you can re-sell a CD, or better yet, an LP. It's like trying to decide whether to pay $10,000 for a car, or paying $10,000 for a photo of a car. For me, it's a no brainer. As an aside, I bought 2 and 3 copies of every Classic Records LP for an average of $40. Apart from my listening copies, I kept the others sealed, and have sold many for 5 or 6 times what I paid for them. You can't do that with a download. Instead of getting lost in the minutia of nearly imperceptible sound differences, people should do their wallets a favor and think in terms of investment, IMHO. Edited by The Dark Lord

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Melcore - thanks for this amazing contribution!!! I think I understand it :thumbsup: I'm going to go ahead with the 2cd packs because if nothing else, they'll look impressive on my CD shelf! I am hoping that the accompanying picture booklet has some 'never seen before' shots, but I think that is hoping for too much. Thanks.

No problem! It looks like the booklets will have some cool pictures, but I'm really interested in seeing what pictures and "memorabilia" the "Super Deluxe" box-sets have! (My bank account will be a bit lighter, though. :P)

I'm an older guy from the vinyl generation, but I cannot fathom the need to decide between a download or a physical product. You can't re-sell a download, but you can re-sell a CD, or better yet, an LP. It's like trying to decide whether to pay $10,000 for a car, or paying $10,000 for a photo of a car. For me, it's a no brainer. As an aside, I bought 2 and 3 copies of every Classic Records LP for an average of $40. Apart from my listening copies, I kept the others sealed, and have sold many for 5 times what I paid for them. You can't do that with a download.

I never considered the sale potential.

I prefer to have a physical product, whether it's a CD or an LP, but I listen to music almost exclusively through digital (computerized) means. Ultimately, I choose what sounds "best" to my ears -- which, of course, should be the most important contributor to any discussion of "which version should I buy?"

I might end up buying the iTunes bonus tracks first, because I might not be able to buy the physical sets immediately upon release.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No problem! It looks like the booklets will have some cool pictures, but I'm really interested in seeing what pictures and "memorabilia" the "Super Deluxe" box-sets have! (My bank account will be a bit lighter, though. :P)

I never considered the sale potential.

I prefer to have a physical product, whether it's a CD or an LP, but I listen to music almost exclusively through digital (computerized) means. Ultimately, I choose what sounds "best" to my ears -- which, of course, should be the most important contributor to any discussion of "which version should I buy?"

I might end up buying the iTunes bonus tracks first, because I might not be able to buy the physical sets immediately upon release.

I agree that it is a personal choice, but I disagree with your comment that the decision should come down to what sounds best. For me, the medium is most important, and it is only an assumption to think that a CD or download has the best sound, unless you've compared the various media, including vinyl. It's a generational thing, I believe, but younger folks today tend to get caught up in the minutia, and sacrifice investment potential. I have been able to finance my collections by selling duplicate purchases over the years, and buying for enjoyment AND investment is a better consideration than buying digital files, IMHO.

I don't sit in judgement, but I do think that folks would be better to consider music as a commodity that has resale value, as opposed to a virtual file that has no real value, beyond an emotional value to the original purchaser.

Edited by The Dark Lord

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer to have a physical product, whether it's a CD or an LP, but I listen to music almost exclusively through digital (computerized) means.

That's my approach too. My iTunes library is 7,000 tracks or so, and fewer than 10 albums are exclusively iTunes downloads. I still buy silver things with holes in the middle of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, DL, like you I too am from the vinyl generation, but as I said above, I did away with my turntable years ago, and unfortunately, sold on my lp's. I didn't envisage that one day vinyl would return to popularity in the way it has. I used to love waiting for new albums to come out to see the artwork, if there were lyrics printed on the back, were there any foldouts inside etc etc.

I'm an older guy from the vinyl generation, but I cannot fathom the need to decide between a download or a physical product. You can't re-sell a download, but you can re-sell a CD, or better yet, an LP. It's like trying to decide whether to pay $10,000 for a car, or paying $10,000 for a photo of a car. For me, it's a no brainer. As an aside, I bought 2 and 3 copies of every Classic Records LP for an average of $40. Apart from my listening copies, I kept the others sealed, and have sold many for 5 or 6 times what I paid for them. You can't do that with a download. Instead of getting lost in the minutia of nearly imperceptible sound differences, people should do their wallets a favor and think in terms of investment, IMHO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am really delighted for all the members on here who are going to get the "Super Deluxe" sets. It's perhaps best finance wise that they are coming out at three a time. That lets you get the cash together for the next three. If all the albums were released at the same time - it would leave the Super Deluxe sets only for the affluent.

No problem! It looks like the booklets will have some cool pictures, but I'm really interested in seeing what pictures and "memorabilia" the "Super Deluxe" box-sets have! (My bank account will be a bit lighter, though. :P)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello everyone,

I love HD digital downloads because of their ease of use and great sound quality. If I were going to buy the Super Deluxe sets with resale value in mind, I wouldn't even think about opening them because so much of the value would be lost. I'm really interested in getting these HD downloads, but not at the price of the entire Super Deluxe set. A lot of you guys have been dismissive of digital downloads, so if you're not going to use them, I'd be happy to buy the cards from you and offset some of your costs. PM me if interested :)

Thanks,
Jonderdonk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, DL, like you I too am from the vinyl generation, but as I said above, I did away with my turntable years ago, and unfortunately, sold on my lp's. I didn't envisage that one day vinyl would return to popularity in the way it has. I used to love waiting for new albums to come out to see the artwork, if there were lyrics printed on the back, were there any foldouts inside etc etc.

Do you have a CD player? CD's are an investment too, and you can still upload to your iTunes library. Again, it's personal choice, but I like to factor investment and finances in to the equation. I'm not judging your decisions; they obviously work for you on some level. It's just that I have a massive digital library too, that I derived from the physical product, and I have something that is worth money at the end of the day, and I would like people to consider this angle. It's only 'cuz I care. :) Edited by The Dark Lord

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×