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What are your top 5 favourite cars?


Charles J. White
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I know nothing about racing cars, never been in a muscle car, and only know enough about them to keep em running...but there's just something about the look and the roar of a big ole heavy car.

I agree. Nothing like feeling the ground shake & smelling burnt rubber, methanol or whatever you're running. My dad told me that drag racing is the only sport that involves two balls. I 100% agree with him on that. B)

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Every time I see the word "Nova" I am reminded of my first car :wub:. So it leaked a little oil, the transmission slipped, it smoked like a chimney, and shook like a son of a bitch. It would have been cool to work on/fix up if it didn't go one on one with a diesel truck.

My current Chevy, a 2004 Malibu, is at about 110,000 miles and I'm starting to worry about it. I've been having some intermittent problems with the transmission. :unsure:

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I would like a Maybach or a Bently with a driver :)

I loved my first car, a 1970 Dodge Dart. And I'm quite fond of my current car (only the 4th I've owned), a 2001 Accord with 180K miles on it. It gets me where I need to go with a minimum amount of hassle and is really comfy.

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Every time I see the word "Nova" I am reminded of my first car :wub:. So it leaked a little oil, the transmission slipped, it smoked like a chimney, and shook like a son of a bitch. It would have been cool to work on/fix up if it didn't go one on one with a diesel truck.

My current Chevy, a 2004 Malibu, is at about 110,000 miles and I'm starting to worry about it. I've been having some intermittent problems with the transmission. :unsure:

They're still out there just waiting for someone to fix them up. My son rebuilds cars/trucks and I'm trying to talk him into making a 67 even a 66 Nova his next project. As long as you can find one that doesn't need a ton of body work, they really aren't that expensive to do.

Good luck with the Malibu !

Edited by ally
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They're still out there just waiting for someone to fix them up. My son rebuilds cars/trucks and I'm trying to talk him into making a 67 even a 66 Nova his next project. As long as you can find one that doesn't need a ton of body work, they really aren't that expensive to do.

Good luck with the Malibu !

My dad is itching to yank the old motor out & stick a V8 in there. I told him I wanted it to run on alcohol but, that's not going to happen. Bummer. I have a parts catalog just for my Chevy II so it makes it tons easier for me to get parts. It's also a great hobby.

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My dad is itching to yank the old motor out & stick a V8 in there. I told him I wanted it to run on alcohol but, that's not going to happen. Bummer. I have a parts catalog just for my Chevy II so it makes it tons easier for me to get parts. It's also a great hobby.

A girl who knows her way around a car and loves Led Zeppelin!?! Where were you 30 years ago? ;)

You must have a trail of guys just panting to ask you out on a date.

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They're still out there just waiting for someone to fix them up. My son rebuilds cars/trucks and I'm trying to talk him into making a 67 even a 66 Nova his next project. As long as you can find one that doesn't need a ton of body work, they really aren't that expensive to do.

My uncle has a shop (not a commercial shop, but a large building on his property) where he has every tool and machine imaginable as well as a paint booth. He is currently rebuilding my late grandpa's 52 Chevy 5 window. It's looking pretty sweet and will be one bad ass (stock looking, modern performance) truck. Whenever I've been out there I've been helping him. I really like cars and enjoy working on them...I just don't know that much.

So if I ever run into a car that needs an overhaul, I'm sure he'd be more than willing to help.

Edited by publicenemy3
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My dad is itching to yank the old motor out & stick a V8 in there. I told him I wanted it to run on alcohol but, that's not going to happen. Bummer. I have a parts catalog just for my Chevy II so it makes it tons easier for me to get parts. It's also a great hobby.

It is a great hobby but it does require patience to do the job right. Just depends on what a person wants. Personally, I'm more of a stock kinda guy but depending on what you're building, it's not always wise to stick with some of the crappy original parts.

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My uncle has a shop (not a commercial shop, but a large building on his property) where he has every tool and machine imaginable as well as a paint booth. He is currently rebuilding my late grandpa's 52 Chevy 5 window. It's looking pretty sweet and will be one bad ass (stock looking, modern performance) truck. Whenever I've been out there I've been helping him. I really like cars and enjoy working on them...I just don't know that much.

So if I ever run into a car that needs an overhaul, I'm sure he'd be more than willing to help.

Yep, space is a definite requirement and unless a guy has money to burn, being able to do at least a portion of the work is pretty much a must. I once rebuilt a 78 Malibu with some big time help from my friends and even though it wasn't what I'd call a major rebuild, I learned a hell of a lot doing it.

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A girl who knows her way around a car and loves Led Zeppelin!?! Where were you 30 years ago? ;)

You must have a trail of guys just panting to ask you out on a date.

I've been approached, yes. And I wish I was around about 30 years ago.

It is a great hobby but it does require patience to do the job right. Just depends on what a person wants. Personally, I'm more of a stock kinda guy but depending on what you're building, it's not always wise to stick with some of the crappy original parts.

Restoring old cars needs to be done right. So it makes sense to take your time & do it right the first time, instead of going back & fixing things. Do it once & your done. Thankfully, I know a guy (my dad) who does paint & body work, rebuilds motors, etc. The only thing I would need done is maybe some tranny work but I know a couple guys that my dad uses. You might spend a few grand but, it will all be worth it & will maybe double the value of the car.

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1966 Pontiac GTO - 389 w/ six-pack

Red-1966-Pontiac-GTO-Coupe-Picture.jpg

1968 Plymouth Barracuda - 426 Hemi, please.

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1970 Pontiac Trans Am - 455 H.O.

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1970 Pontiac Grand Prix SSJ Hurst - optional 455, thanks. Only 272 ever built for this year.

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1970 Buick Gran Sport GSX - 455 with Stage 2 components installed.

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Sure, I love Corvettes of all the coolest years, and '66 - '70 Chevelle SS's and whatnot - who doesn't?

I went with some of the less-obvious picks that are near and dear to my heart.

Yes, the '69 and '70 GTO Judge was a beast, but the '67 has sexy lines I've always loved.

And the newer Plymouth 'Cudas were more insanely powerful than the older Barracuda, but I remember having a purple 1968 Barracuda Hot Wheels car as a kid, and it's always remained my favorite.

Both older Firebird 400s and newer Trans Ams are either more popular or more valuable, but that 1970 was a real beast.

My last 2 picks are slightly more obscure, but ones that I love for odd reasons.

I gained an appreciation for Grand Prixs in junior high after seeing a 1971 LJ my friend's father was working on in his garage.

I loved the way the console wrapped around the driver in an almost cockpit configuration, with the shifter angled in towards the driver, as well.

And the GSX is often overlooked among all the attention-drawing Chevelles, Corvettes and various Mopars, and yet is at least the equal of many of the more recognizable makes.

I have a lot of love for many late '60s to mid '70s cars that may not have as impressive performance, but look awesome.

The 1972 Buick Riviera (Boat Tail) immediately comes to mind.

And, of course, my very own 1969 Plymouth Fury III.

Certainly not a true muscle car, but a lot of character and styling reminiscent of the more potent Mopars of the time (Road Runner, etc.)

I intend to continually repair it while driving it, and maybe in a year or so I can get another car to drive, and garage it in order to go for a more complete restoration.

I'd love to find a 440 to replace the current 318.

It has kind of an old-school gangster vibe with the fender skirts, and it's a blast to drive.

I originally bought it for my 18 year old son, and he loved it.

But within a couple months he got in a wreck, and it took almost a year to get it repaired.

He was glad to get it back, but the day-to-day stuff of dealing with an old car began to overwhelm his love for the car, so I traded with him.

He needs a modern car he can turn the key and go, not having to let it idle for 10 minutes before it's fully warmed up on cold mornings.

So now he's driving the 2002 Chrysler 300M Special Edition I bought used a few months ago.

Yeah, he's got leather seats, dual exhaust and working heat/AC, but I figured I'd take better care of the Fury, and keep it's value up until I can attempt a legitimate restoration.

Time will tell.

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