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What Made You Happy today?

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Getting back in touch (sort of) with an great friend who I haven't seen for 21 years.

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Getting back in touch (sort of) with an great friend who I haven't seen for 21 years.

Awesome! I had that experience today, with a friend I haven't seen in 14 years...:)

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Having a Billy Joel ticket bought on my behalf. Also, having a haircut that I'm actually pleased with. I found a formal dress too, it's not too expensive and they've put it on hold for me.

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RAIN!!!!!!!!! :banana::cheer:

At last! Not nearly as much as I would like but better than nothing.

LOL... we'll send you some more rain from Texas. I'm also happy to know it will rain. I guess I'm an adrenaline junky.

If there's going to be a hurricane, might as well enjoy it if we're able. If you're stuck at home because of the storm, party with friends, etc. When given lemons, make lemonade. B)

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Brace yourselves, I'm a mechanical engineer and this is going to seem dorky.

I have just finished designing a geared transmission shaft that is required to transmit 100 lbf +/-5% to two other gears with resistance torques of 300 lbf each. I designed it to have a 95% reliable infinite fatigue life with a fatigue safety factor of 3.02, and a desired safety factor for yielding of 2.00.

In essense, this part will never break, even after a lifetime of the specified load fluctuation (paperclips, for example, do not have infinite fatigue lifes as evident by them breaking after only a few bends back and forth).

You can even apply (statically) twice the rated loading, or 210 lbf, before this thing will yield/break. This is for your own safety. Think of a ladder that says it is rated for 250 lbs. Engineers know that a 350 lb person will no doubt use the ladder anyways, hence why we design with safety factors.

All this, while decreasing the shaft diameter from 1.38 inches to 1.179 inches. (Saves material. Material saved = higher profit)

In addition, I was able to write a Matlab program for a shaft of this type that will solve for the required shaft diameter needed (based on the max. shear stress & distortion energy theorms) for any desired safety factor. The program's required inputs include gear forces, gear diameters, desired safety factor, shaft length, etc.

There is no telling just how lame this must sound to all of you. I wouldn't be surprised if 60% of you haven't even made it to this point in my post before moving on to the next one. I guess this is the price I pay.

But there is no denying that this is what made me happy today.

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I met "~tangerine~" from our board and she's a lovely easy going person.

:cheer: :cheer: :cheer:

Oh yeah, don't get a big head ledhead :)

<spell edit, it's early :coffee:>

Edited by Speed Racer

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That on my birthday in 1977 there were 100,000 people at the Emerson, Lake, and Palmer concert and my brother and I were in 9 of the 11 audience shots with a couple of zoom ins in the movie of the show and that at Paul McCartneys' show there were 260,000 people and my girlfriend and I were one of the 5 interviews given by TVA news to people in the audience as well as the timing of Paul playing Drive My Car and me coming in "and baby I love you" and kissing her during the interview of a few seconds is pretty damn cool!!!

Edited by roblindblad

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Well, time to show my new friend more of our gorgeous city and tons of cool sites.

Never underestimate the power of the zeppelin.

Enjoy your day :cheer: :cheer: :cheer:

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Well, time to show my new friend more of our gorgeous city and tons of cool sites.

Never underestimate the power of the zeppelin.

Enjoy your day :cheer: :cheer: :cheer:

So far very nice. I loved the waterfalls yesterday and we gotta go back so i can get under it!!! Okay let's get going, i wanna try that Cuban cafe for lunch. Downtown Asheville is a great place! I'm trying to get Speed to post a pic of us...

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Well, time to show my new friend more of our gorgeous city and tons of cool sites.

Never underestimate the power of the zeppelin.

Enjoy your day :cheer: :cheer: :cheer:

Three cheers for new friends B) B)

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Before there was a great thunderstorm and rain, was listening to -the doors/la woman, that was cool.

listening to lou reed now and my dog/with the hurt leg has got his head resting on my hurt toe...which i took him to the vet yesterday and was tending to the toe yesterday too. Funny how an animal can zone in on something like that.

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So far very nice. I loved the waterfalls yesterday and we gotta go back so i can get under it!!! Okay let's get going, i wanna try that Cuban cafe for lunch. Downtown Asheville is a great place! I'm trying to get Speed to post a pic of us...

My husband and I honeymooned in Asheville. I know the Cuban cafe you're speaking of.....SOOOOO good! Asheville is awesome!

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This unbelievable feeling of success and satisfaction.

The last days were so outstanding:

On monday I had the first gig with my new band after 5 days of rehearsals and it was so great.

Our f***ing headmaster didn't allow us to play inside (too loud,you know) so we moved out though it started to rain. And for a first gig it went great. It was such a great athmosphere in the gym and everybody cheared. And after that I won a poetry slam.

This was not the best thing this week...

Yesterday me and my sister won a student short film award (soon to be posted on youtube if i can work it out...). It was a really glamorous show, a bit like the Oscars and we were so surprised to win the "best effects" and to be nominated for "best film"!!! I was so exited that I hardly could say a word on stage.

And the whole guys of my class are my fanclub now...

And now i ve got HOLIDAYS!!!

Hasta la vista School! No more pencils no more books no more teachers dirty looks.

Freedom for six weeks.

And my parents offered me a lapsteel guitar for my good grades. I am so happy i can't express in the moment!

love you all!!!

(oops. I AM euphoric as you see...)

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Brace yourselves, I'm a mechanical engineer and this is going to seem dorky.

I have just finished designing a geared transmission shaft that is required to transmit 100 lbf +/-5% to two other gears with resistance torques of 300 lbf each. I designed it to have a 95% reliable infinite fatigue life with a fatigue safety factor of 3.02, and a desired safety factor for yielding of 2.00.

In essense, this part will never break, even after a lifetime of the specified load fluctuation (paperclips, for example, do not have infinite fatigue lifes as evident by them breaking after only a few bends back and forth).

You can even apply (statically) twice the rated loading, or 210 lbf, before this thing will yield/break. This is for your own safety. Think of a ladder that says it is rated for 250 lbs. Engineers know that a 350 lb person will no doubt use the ladder anyways, hence why we design with safety factors.

All this, while decreasing the shaft diameter from 1.38 inches to 1.179 inches. (Saves material. Material saved = higher profit)

In addition, I was able to write a Matlab program for a shaft of this type that will solve for the required shaft diameter needed (based on the max. shear stress & distortion energy theorms) for any desired safety factor. The program's required inputs include gear forces, gear diameters, desired safety factor, shaft length, etc.

There is no telling just how lame this must sound to all of you. I wouldn't be surprised if 60% of you haven't even made it to this point in my post before moving on to the next one. I guess this is the price I pay.

But there is no denying that this is what made me happy today.

VERY Impressive Docron!! :cheer:

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Well, time to show my new friend more of our gorgeous city and tons of cool sites.

Never underestimate the power of the zeppelin.

Enjoy your day :cheer: :cheer: :cheer:

Aha! I knew it! You're LedBaby right?! I do hope you and Tangerine are enjoying your meet up!

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Brace yourselves, I'm a mechanical engineer and this is going to seem dorky.

I have just finished designing a geared transmission shaft that is required to transmit 100 lbf +/-5% to two other gears with resistance torques of 300 lbf each. I designed it to have a 95% reliable infinite fatigue life with a fatigue safety factor of 3.02, and a desired safety factor for yielding of 2.00.

In essense, this part will never break, even after a lifetime of the specified load fluctuation (paperclips, for example, do not have infinite fatigue lifes as evident by them breaking after only a few bends back and forth).

You can even apply (statically) twice the rated loading, or 210 lbf, before this thing will yield/break. This is for your own safety. Think of a ladder that says it is rated for 250 lbs. Engineers know that a 350 lb person will no doubt use the ladder anyways, hence why we design with safety factors.

All this, while decreasing the shaft diameter from 1.38 inches to 1.179 inches. (Saves material. Material saved = higher profit)

In addition, I was able to write a Matlab program for a shaft of this type that will solve for the required shaft diameter needed (based on the max. shear stress & distortion energy theorms) for any desired safety factor. The program's required inputs include gear forces, gear diameters, desired safety factor, shaft length, etc.

There is no telling just how lame this must sound to all of you. I wouldn't be surprised if 60% of you haven't even made it to this point in my post before moving on to the next one. I guess this is the price I pay.

But there is no denying that this is what made me happy today.

but the question i have is...why can't you design a paperclip with an infinite fatigue life?...

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After a really crappy, totally stressed out day a friend on MySpace posted some photos of Jason and Foreigner (she went to see them last night) and made my day. :)

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Encouraging messages from good friends like MissHoneydripper. :drunk:

Edited by Roxie

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Brace yourselves, I'm a mechanical engineer and this is going to seem dorky.

I have just finished designing a geared transmission shaft that is required to transmit 100 lbf +/-5% to two other gears with resistance torques of 300 lbf each. I designed it to have a 95% reliable infinite fatigue life with a fatigue safety factor of 3.02, and a desired safety factor for yielding of 2.00.

In essense, this part will never break, even after a lifetime of the specified load fluctuation (paperclips, for example, do not have infinite fatigue lifes as evident by them breaking after only a few bends back and forth).

You can even apply (statically) twice the rated loading, or 210 lbf, before this thing will yield/break. This is for your own safety. Think of a ladder that says it is rated for 250 lbs. Engineers know that a 350 lb person will no doubt use the ladder anyways, hence why we design with safety factors.

All this, while decreasing the shaft diameter from 1.38 inches to 1.179 inches. (Saves material. Material saved = higher profit)

In addition, I was able to write a Matlab program for a shaft of this type that will solve for the required shaft diameter needed (based on the max. shear stress & distortion energy theorms) for any desired safety factor. The program's required inputs include gear forces, gear diameters, desired safety factor, shaft length, etc.

There is no telling just how lame this must sound to all of you. I wouldn't be surprised if 60% of you haven't even made it to this point in my post before moving on to the next one. I guess this is the price I pay.

But there is no denying that this is what made me happy today.

Ah! I'm beginning to understand now, why I should have been born with six inch long rubber fingers. You guys design equipment as though it will "NEVER BREAK" LOL!

I've changed many a striped out gear shafts in the bottom of a barge in 104f temp.

after an impellar on the end of that gearbox locked up and the 671 Detroit Diesel with

a gear driven supercharger and 850ftlbs of torque sheared it like peanut butter without missing a beat! :lol:

A buddy of mine, his father was a mechanical engineer with a degree from Tulane and Loyola. One day he was installing winch motors on his boat that were to be used for hoisting wingnet frames (80ga aluminum) and he couldn't figure out why when he applied the switch that the motors wouln't run. So he calls me up and ofcourse I couldn't diagnose the problem over the phone so I head down to the dock to have a look.

Well as soon as I pull up I see the problem, he has 115v house wiring going up the A frame to the motors :lol:

I tell him that the wire is too small for a 12v system and he argues that the wire can handle 115v I said yes but it must have taken 15min for him to comprehend that he needed heavier gauge wire for the increase in amperage. The lower the voltage the higher the amps :lol:

Reminding me of this story is what made me happy today :lol:

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but the question i have is...why can't you design a paperclip with an infinite fatigue life?...

:hysterical::hysterical::hysterical:

Very funny Debbie Downer :lol:

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So far very nice. I loved the waterfalls yesterday and we gotta go back so i can get under it!!! Okay let's get going, i wanna try that Cuban cafe for lunch. Downtown Asheville is a great place! I'm trying to get Speed to post a pic of us...

Awww. Thank you ~tangerine~. Hope you enjoyed the guys at The Lobster Trap playing Led Zeps Tangerine for you. I know I sure did and the fresh lobster. Three cheers for 18hr Maine Lobster

:cheer: :cheer: :cheer:

Tomorrow will be Ghost Town and then Biltmore House. Today was Cherokee, Nantahala Gorge, Fontana Dam, Fontana Village and lake.....

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Ah! I'm beginning to understand now, why I should have been born with six inch long rubber fingers. You guys design equipment as though it will "NEVER BREAK" LOL!

I've changed many a striped out gear shafts in the bottom of a barge in 104f temp.

after an impellar on the end of that gearbox locked up and the 671 Detroit Diesel with

a gear driven supercharger and 850ftlbs of torque sheared it like peanut butter without missing a beat! :lol:

A buddy of mine, his father was a mechanical engineer with a degree from Tulane and Loyola. One day he was installing winch motors on his boat that were to be used for hoisting wingnet frames (80ga aluminum) and he couldn't figure out why when he applied the switch that the motors wouln't run. So he calls me up and ofcourse I couldn't diagnose the problem over the phone so I head down to the dock to have a look.

Well as soon as I pull up I see the problem, he has 115v house wiring going up the A frame to the motors :lol:

I tell him that the wire is too small for a 12v system and he argues that the wire can handle 115v I said yes but it must have taken 15min for him to comprehend that he needed heavier gauge wire for the increase in amperage. The lower the voltage the higher the amps :lol:

Reminding me of this story is what made me happy today :lol:

Mechanical engineers will be the first to tell you that they don't know shit about electrical. B)

As for the stripped out shafts - we design (with economic reason) to what people tell us the typical loading will be. Unless its life-threatening, it was probably almost better that the shaft sheared once the impellar locked up, because if it didn't, you could have incurred more costly damage to the engine, support bearings, etc. Designing a shaft that could withstand the things you speak of would be bad for resources as well - it would have a diameter of 2 feet, and it would cost and weigh a shitload. Aside for designing things that "never break", part of being an engineer is to decide what will break first.

It follows that you simply cannot please everybody all the time B)

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Mechanical engineers will be the first to tell you that they don't know shit about electrical. B)

As for the stripped out shafts - we design (with economic reason) to what people tell us the typical loading will be. Unless its life-threatening, it was probably almost better that the shaft sheared once the impellar locked up, because if it didn't, you could have incurred more costly damage to the engine, support bearings, etc. Designing a shaft that could withstand the things you speak of would be bad for resources as well - it would have a diameter of 2 feet, and it would cost and weigh a shitload. Aside for designing things that "never break", part of being an engineer is to decide what will break first.

It follows that you simply cannot please everybody all the time B)

:lol: I hear that brotha

Another thing made me happy today, I pre-ordered the TSRTS Vinyl set hope I'm one of the lucky 100 B)

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