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Jimmy playing with Harry Connick in the early 90s?


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hecube, no photos, but from People Magazine archive :-)

http://www.people.com/people/archive/article/0,,20112326,00.html

IT HAD TO BE YOU ON THE STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN

Jimmy Page, Led Zeppelin's legendary in-your-face guitarist, is just wild about crooner Harry Connick Jr., and even jammed with him at a Connick concert in Miami recently. "I'd been listening to his music, and I was keen to see what his concert would be like," says Page, 48, who was in Miami working on a new album. "We met before the concert, and Harry said, 'You should come up and play,' and I laughed. But I was sitting in the audience, and he suddenly said, 'We've got a really good friend here.... C'mon, Jimmy, come up and play with us.' I went up, and he put a guitar in my hands and said, 'Go ahead, it's your band.' So I did an improvised blues in B flat. I was so nervous! And he went over to the brass section and started singing these licks and cued them in." Would Page consider an encore? "Oh, yes, but I'll bring my own guitar the next time."

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LOL!!! We would all make great detectives. It always amazes me at that contributions from so many because of our love of this band and the music :yesnod:

Edit to add : I have a friend who was at that concert. I'll try to reach out to her and see if she has any photos:-)

Edited by Deborah J
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LOL!!! We would all make great detectives. It always amazes me at that contributions from so many because of our love of this band and the music :yesnod:

Edit to add : I have a friend who was at that concert. I'll try to reach out to her and see if she has any photos:-)

Any luck?

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This event occured on February 13, 1992 at the James L. Knight Center in Miami. Unfortunately, there are no photographs or recordings known to be in circulation.

Oh, there's a specific date? I thought last time that this was posted on, it was undetermined the exact date, either the 12th or 13th...

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Oh, there's a specific date? I thought last time that this was posted on, it was undetermined the exact date, either the 12th or 13th...

Apologies for a typo on my part...the correct date is February 14th 1992. Long story short, I recently obtained a review of the February 13th concert (below) and Jimmy's onstage appearance is unmentioned. Given Jimmy was a FL resident at the time & had last performed in Miami nearly five years prior one would think it would bear mentioning if he had.

Unfortunately, there don't seem to be any reviews of the February 14th 1992 concert in existence to confirm with certainty.

Miami Herald, The (FL)

February 14, 1992

Edition: FINAL

Section: LOCAL

Page: 5B

HARRY CONNICK RAGGED BUT ENTERTAINING

Author: LEONARD PITTS Jr. Herald Pop Music Critic

OK, this started out to be a pretty negative review. Then it became a fairly glowing review. After that, it went back to negative. And now, it's . . . it's . . .

Well, frankly, it doesn't know what the heck it is. Blame Harry Connick Jr. for that. He's the one who wore his identity crisis on his sleeve Thursday night at the James L. Knight Center. He'll perform there again tonight.

Sure, you think of him as just that guy who's making a living as a Frank Sinatra for the '90s. Truth is, that doesn't cover the half of it.

Onstage Thursday, Connick was a manic fireball of creativity. He was by turns brilliant, infuriating, unbelievably bad, splashy, twisted and moving. Often, all within the context of the same song.

Think of a car, its accelerator jammed down, its steering wheel removed, so that it careens all over the place without direction. Or think of a sailor on a weekend pass, lurching drunkenly from one side of the street to the other and back again, looking for a good time.

Either metaphor will do quite nicely to sum up Connick's set. He wandered madly all over the American musical landscape, incorporating gospel, rock a la Hendrix, Harlem stride piano, contemporary jazz, blues, the theme from The Beverly Hillbillies and of course, big band pop into a weird, sometimes wonderful musical stew.

Take his rendition of Chattanooga Choo-Choo as an emblem for all that was right -- and wrong with the show. It started as a pretty straight-forward piano rendition with the left-hand playing a bassline that emulated a train on the move and the right hand tossing in an occasional toot on the horn. Nice. Then Connick stopped playing and started beating his body and the piano for percussion effect. He even got up and tap-danced the tune -- moving with all the grace of a man trying to shake pebbles from his shoes. Weird. But wait, there's more. He went back to the keyboard, cranked out some improvisations, and then re-did the song as Harlem stride, a la, say, Fats Waller.

Strange. But nice.

Connick's fundamental problem is also, paradoxically, his fundamental strength. Namely, a restless drive to create on the fly -- improvising, taking chances. Sometimes it worked, as with his ragged rendition of the old gospel standard Glory Hallelujah. It was truly ugly at first, Connick singing the lyric and then coaxing the boys in the band to have a go at it. They were . . . well, the most polite word is "terrible." So bad, the crowd laughed, thinking it a joke.

"Never laugh at something that's beautiful," admonished Connick, apparently hearing something no one else in the room did. "I'm serious," he said. "They're singin' with their heart and soul."

Sure enough, he stuck with it and managed to melt that ugliness away, managed to get the house up and shouting to that old revival-tent standard.

Yet there were other times Connick's drive to try something new didn't work. The best example, coincidentally, also had to do with a foray into gospel. Connick tried to rebuild Danny Boy, the ancient Irish ballad, as a black church song. But he never was able to resolve the delicate sentimentality of the lyrics with the emotive power of the arrangement. Even though there were segments of the show that were too ragged, spontaneous, or

bent for their own good, you have to credit Connick for at least trying. The fact that he seemed to be making it up as he went along lent a refreshingly loose feel to the proceedings.

Say this about the set Thursday night. It was uneven. It worked about as consistently as a Hollywood unknown. It was loopy and often out of control. But it was seldom less than entertaining.

Article courtesy Steve A. Jones Archive

Edited by SteveAJones
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  • 8 years later...

Just ran across this post. I was AT that show, took my wife for Valentines Day. I tell that story at least once a year to someone. Here's how it went down. Connick announced at the beginning of the show that we had a special guest with us that night. I was thinking Frank Sinatra. So he plays about an hour and 15 or so and by then we had all forgotten about it. It had a been a really good show up to that point. Connick comes back center stage at that point and invites his special guest, "Ladies and Gentlemen, Jimmy Page!" I was absolutely floored, so was everyone else, there was a kind of incredulous gasp and then a growing applause as Page comes out of the audience up front. Literally took the guitarists instrument who offered it almost as an homage, with a mock prayer hands and bow. A cool moment. two numbers, the Bb thing he mentions in the interview and then one more. He was clearly struggling with the guitar but he gave a super effort and stayed with the band the whole time. Then he was off the stage, running out the back of the hall. 

Of course, at this point, the show wasn't over and I'm thinking "OK Connick, what'll you do to top that??" But he DID top it, he absolutely SLAYED the rest of the set. It may have been the best display of pure musical showmanship I've ever seen. A fantastic show.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/3/2021 at 5:39 AM, SteveF said:

Just ran across this post. I was AT that show, took my wife for Valentines Day. I tell that story at least once a year to someone. Here's how it went down. Connick announced at the beginning of the show that we had a special guest with us that night. I was thinking Frank Sinatra. So he plays about an hour and 15 or so and by then we had all forgotten about it. It had a been a really good show up to that point. Connick comes back center stage at that point and invites his special guest, "Ladies and Gentlemen, Jimmy Page!" I was absolutely floored, so was everyone else, there was a kind of incredulous gasp and then a growing applause as Page comes out of the audience up front. Literally took the guitarists instrument who offered it almost as an homage, with a mock prayer hands and bow. A cool moment. two numbers, the Bb thing he mentions in the interview and then one more. He was clearly struggling with the guitar but he gave a super effort and stayed with the band the whole time. Then he was off the stage, running out the back of the hall. 

Of course, at this point, the show wasn't over and I'm thinking "OK Connick, what'll you do to top that??" But he DID top it, he absolutely SLAYED the rest of the set. It may have been the best display of pure musical showmanship I've ever seen. A fantastic show.

 

 

Thanks for that. Another attendee claims that after the show a limo pulled up to the venue. They said they exclaimed, "Wow! Nice limo" and a gentleman walking past them from behind replied "Thanks!" as he quickly got in and was driven away. That gentleman was Jimmy Page.

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