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clw

last concert

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it looks to me they played only 4 concerts in 79 after Robert lost Karac,is this correct? And then in 80 they played

(CLICK DATES FOR DETAILED GIG INFO)

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(CLICK DATES FOR DETAILED GIG INFO)

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I thought Karac died in 1977 and Robert took a year and longer off. They were going to play in New Orleans and Robert got the news of his son's death when he arrived in NO. I could be wrong about this, but it seems to be the prevailing account of what happened. You are right CLW. They were getting ready to come here and Bonzo died in September. They never played in the US again. I think the last concert they played in the US was in California. Someone will know exactly where they played before they came to New Orleans.

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Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, Oakland, California, USA, Sunday, July 24, 1977.

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Thanks, Sue. I remember that date and place now. How could I ever forget it. Do you know if there is a video of the concert? It would certainly make me cry watching it knowing it would be the last time...ugh.

Is this also the concert with the Graham incident?

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There is no known visual reference of this concert beyond the dozens (possibly hundreds) of photographs in circulation. There are, however, three different film sources for the show from the day before. If you're interested, there's also a few audience tapes (sound only) of the 24th in circulation.

This show took place the day after the aforementioned incident.

Edited by Sue Dounim

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Thanks so much Sue. I have heard the sound track from the concert. I don't like to dwell on all this too much, ya know.

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he did and this is the dates in 79 when they played again.almost 2 years

I thought Karac died in 1977 and Robert took a year and longer off. They were going to play in New Orleans and Robert got the news of his son's death when he arrived in NO. I could be wrong about this, but it seems to be the prevailing account of what happened. You are right CLW. They were getting ready to come here and Bonzo died in September. They never played in the US again. I think the last concert they played in the US was in California. Someone will know exactly where they played before they came to New Orleans.

I thought Karac died in 1977 and Robert took a year and longer off. They were going to play in New Orleans and Robert got the news of his son's death when he arrived in NO. I could be wrong about this, but it seems to be the prevailing account of what happened. You are right CLW. They were getting ready to come here and Bonzo died in September. They never played in the US again. I think the last concert they played in the US was in California. Someone will know exactly where they played before they came to New Orleans.

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what incident?

During the 23/7/77 Oakland show, Peter Grant's son was backstage and removed a "Led Zeppelin" sign from one of the trailers. One of Bill Graham's guys, Jim Mazorkis, saw the kid do this, gave him hell and slapped him. Unfortunately for Mazorkis, John Bonham happened to be off stage at the time and saw this- Bonzo then proceeded to kick the guy in the balls and gave him a few choice words of his own...then Bonham told Peter Grant about it. Grant flipped out, told Richard Cole and John Bindon, and the three of them found Mazorkis and proceeded to beat the guy within an inch of his life. Then they forced Bill Graham to sign a document absolving them of any responsibility for the beating- otherwise Zeppelin would not play the gig the next day. Graham signed the paper, but had Bonham, Grant, Cole and Bindon charged with assault anyway.

This incident goes a long way towards explaining why the second Oakland gig on 24/7/77 seems so "rushed", since Zeppelin really didn't want to do it and played with a "let's get it over with" attitude (having said that, though, it's actually not a bad performance). The incident also is a good illustration of just how crazy things were getting within the upper echelons of Led Zeppelin's entourage- they were all so coked out by this point that any slight against the band was dealt with in a violent manner...they really kind of felt themselves above the law, and the Oakland incident was ultimately a harsh reminder that they were not. Arguably the darkest blot on Led Zeppelin's image/reputation...

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Thanks Nutrocker. I don't like to think or talk about this incident. Too much happened later on - all that tragic stuff.

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During the 23/7/77 Oakland show, Peter Grant's son was backstage and removed a "Led Zeppelin" sign from one of the trailers. One of Bill Graham's guys, Jim Mazorkis, saw the kid do this, gave him hell and slapped him. Unfortunately for Mazorkis, John Bonham happened to be off stage at the time and saw this- Bonzo then proceeded to kick the guy in the balls and gave him a few choice words of his own...then Bonham told Peter Grant about it. Grant flipped out, told Richard Cole and John Bindon, and the three of them found Mazorkis and proceeded to beat the guy within an inch of his life. Then they forced Bill Graham to sign a document absolving them of any responsibility for the beating- otherwise Zeppelin would not play the gig the next day. Graham signed the paper, but had Bonham, Grant, Cole and Bindon charged with assault anyway.

This incident goes a long way towards explaining why the second Oakland gig on 24/7/77 seems so "rushed", since Zeppelin really didn't want to do it and played with a "let's get it over with" attitude (having said that, though, it's actually not a bad performance). The incident also is a good illustration of just how crazy things were getting within the upper echelons of Led Zeppelin's entourage- they were all so coked out by this point that any slight against the band was dealt with in a violent manner...they really kind of felt themselves above the law, and the Oakland incident was ultimately a harsh reminder that they were not. Arguably the darkest blot on Led Zeppelin's image/reputation...

Oh wow,I wonder where the rest of the band members were,how old was this kid and removing a sign,big deal!

During the 23/7/77 Oakland show, Peter Grant's son was backstage and removed a "Led Zeppelin" sign from one of the trailers. One of Bill Graham's guys, Jim Mazorkis, saw the kid do this, gave him hell and slapped him. Unfortunately for Mazorkis, John Bonham happened to be off stage at the time and saw this- Bonzo then proceeded to kick the guy in the balls and gave him a few choice words of his own...then Bonham told Peter Grant about it. Grant flipped out, told Richard Cole and John Bindon, and the three of them found Mazorkis and proceeded to beat the guy within an inch of his life. Then they forced Bill Graham to sign a document absolving them of any responsibility for the beating- otherwise Zeppelin would not play the gig the next day. Graham signed the paper, but had Bonham, Grant, Cole and Bindon charged with assault anyway.

This incident goes a long way towards explaining why the second Oakland gig on 24/7/77 seems so "rushed", since Zeppelin really didn't want to do it and played with a "let's get it over with" attitude (having said that, though, it's actually not a bad performance). The incident also is a good illustration of just how crazy things were getting within the upper echelons of Led Zeppelin's entourage- they were all so coked out by this point that any slight against the band was dealt with in a violent manner...they really kind of felt themselves above the law, and the Oakland incident was ultimately a harsh reminder that they were not. Arguably the darkest blot on Led Zeppelin's image/reputation...

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Peter Grant's son was right to remove the sign, probably. Here in NYC movies and TV episodes are constantly being filmed and you NEVER see the stars' names on the trailers for obvious reasons (there is a sign posted in the neighborhood in advance informing people of the filming and the name of the show/movie, so that people are prepared and in case they need to file a complaint).

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I think Grant's son was just removing the sign as a souvenir. Not to justify the extreme measures taken, but you don't have to be on cocaine to get enraged when a grown man slaps your 11-year old son. There was some weak talk like the boy was just pushed...and that the kid was getting defiant when he was told to put the sign back. Fucking whatever. If you're a grown man, don't come crying to me if you start manhandling some kid and then giant papa bear shows up with his buddies.

And as far as being above the law...well, they were arrested, but ended up getting off with fines for trapping a man in a trailer and beating him bloody. That might not be above the law, but it's pretty much a tap on the wrist.

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They should have gotten rid of Cole long before they did.

Why? I think the wheels started coming off the Zeppelin entourage when Peter Grant hired John Bindon as 'head of security' on the '77 tour...sure, Richard Cole was a bit of a looney at times (usually whilst in cahoots with none other than John Bonham), but it was pretty much unanimous among Zeppelin and their people that Bindon was an outright fucking psycho who really had no business being there at all. Cole did his job, and, to his credit, saved the band's ass -either as individuals or collectively- on more than one occasion. By the time of the Oakland Incident Richard Cole was really just along for the ride, and has admitted since that even he didn't like the way things were going...

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I find it weird that Robert would dedicate songs (OtHaFA no less....) to Mr. John Bindon

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Why? I think the wheels started coming off the Zeppelin entourage when Peter Grant hired John Bindon as 'head of security' on the '77 tour...sure, Richard Cole was a bit of a looney at times (usually whilst in cahoots with none other than John Bonham), but it was pretty much unanimous among Zeppelin and their people that Bindon was an outright fucking psycho who really had no business being there at all. Cole did his job, and, to his credit, saved the band's ass -either as individuals or collectively- on more than one occasion. By the time of the Oakland Incident Richard Cole was really just along for the ride, and has admitted since that even he didn't like the way things were going...

When you read about this in the Hoskyns book, it's kind of interesting because you get the very strong impression that Richard Cole was kind of hurt that John Bindon was brought in and was kind of edging in on his territory in a way. I say it's interesting because you don't usually think of big bad Richard Cole as having hurt feelings. There's a Disney movie in there somewhere...or maybe not.

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I find it weird that Robert would dedicate songs (OtHaFA no less....) to Mr. John Bindon

Probably Robert's sarcasm/twisted sense of humour at play in that Bindon dedication. Unsurprising perhaps but Plant and Jones were the most leery of Bindon being on the road with them...

When you read about this in the Hoskyns book, it's kind of interesting because you get the very strong impression that Richard Cole was kind of hurt that John Bindon was brought in and was kind of edging in on his territory in a way. I say it's interesting because you don't usually think of big bad Richard Cole as having hurt feelings. There's a Disney movie in there somewhere...or maybe not.

Ultimately Richard Cole found out the hard way that he was both expendable and replaceable.

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Understandable. I rarely listen to it myself because its so rushed.

I find the two Oakland concerts to be among the most interesting, and best, of 1977 -- they have this energy to them that so many of the other concerts were lacking...while the concert on the 23rd might be the better, the quality of the recording (first AUD source) for the 24th blows me away: Listen to the bass and bass drum in "Sick Again"! "Ten Years Gone" from the final American concert gets my vote as among the best performances of that song, too.

Edited by Melcórë

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I find the two Oakland concerts to be among the most interesting, and best, of 1977 -- they have this energy to them that so many of the other concerts were lacking...while the concert on the 23rd might be the better, the quality of the recording (first AUD source) for the 24th blows me away: Listen to the bass and bass drum in "Sick Again"! "Ten Years Gone" from the final American concert gets my vote as among the best performances of that song, too.

Personally I'd have to give the edge to the 24th as being the better performance if for no other reason but the trainwreck during the "Ten Years Gone" solo on the 23rd...what an embarassment!

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Personally I'd have to give the edge to the 24th as being the better performance if for no other reason but the trainwreck during the "Ten Years Gone" solo on the 23rd...what an embarassment!

I've decided to go back on my earlier assessment -- the 24th seems to be a much better performance than the 23rd.

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I went to the 24th and I thought it was VERY disappointing. The band was hours late, the performance was sluggish and short, and Jimmy just scowled through the whole show. It really sucked!

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I went to the 24th and I thought it was VERY disappointing. The band was hours late, the performance was sluggish and short, and Jimmy just scowled through the whole show. It really sucked!

Compared to other shows from the tour, the second Oakland performance is far from sluggish. In fact, it sounds a bit rushed, which gives it an energy lacking from several of the others.

Sucks that your memory is so negative -- other reviews are more positive. Knowing what we know about the problems surrounding the concert, I can understand why Jimmy would have been tense.

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