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Ross62

Remembering John Bonham.

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Another year gone by.

This one is special though as we remember and celebrate what would have been John Bonham's 65th birthday.

There's plenty going on with a celebration in Bonzo's home town ~ http://www.bravewords.com/news/204843 and Bonzo Bash ~

https://www.facebook.com/notes/bonzo-bash/marshallnatalmodern-drummer-presents-bonzo-birthday-bash-east-coast-invasion/308218005982510 hitting New York and New Jersey to a thunderous reception.As well as our own memories and thoughts.

post-1183-0-07262500-1369969768.jpg post-1183-0-54737000-1369969806_thumb.jp

John Henry Bonham,remembered fondly and with deep respect.

31-5-48 ~ 25-9-80

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Sixty-five years. In other words, he has now been gone longer than he was alive. Thirty-three years of being cheated from hearing new music and seeing him play. What a pity.

Happy birthday John Henry Bonham.

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HAPPY 65th BIRTHDAY TO YOU!!!

JOHN HENRY BONHAM. THE GREATEST ROCK AND ROLL DRUMMER OF ALL-TIME.

I know that I am not the only one who knows that this is the TRUTH!!!

BONZO FOREVER!!!

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Looking back the Fall/Winter of 1980 was pretty rough.....

I was in 8th grade (Chicago suburbs) at the time & school had just started. I remember hearing about his passing the next day at school. Being only in 8th grade I did not know much about Led Zeppelin - but that all changed after the 25th of September that year.

How sad that only a few months later we'd lose John Lennon too. I'd be interested in hearing from folks from that generation. With the loss of Bonzo & Lennon.... what were your thoughts - did you think the whole world had gone to hell, did you hold on to any hope for the future of music in the 1980's?? Thanks!

RIP Bonzo bless you

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Looking back the Fall/Winter of 1980 was pretty rough.....

I was in 8th grade (Chicago suburbs) at the time & school had just started. I remember hearing about his passing the next day at school. Being only in 8th grade I did not know much about Led Zeppelin - but that all changed after the 25th of September that year.

How sad that only a few months later we'd lose John Lennon too. I'd be interested in hearing from folks from that generation. With the loss of Bonzo & Lennon.... what were your thoughts - did you think the whole world had gone to hell, did you hold on to any hope for the future of music in the 1980's?? Thanks!

RIP Bonzo bless you

Don't forget Bon Scott. He died in 1980 too. Tragic year for music.

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Another year gone by.

This one is special though as we remember and celebrate what would have been John Bonham's 65th birthday.

There's plenty going on with a celebration in Bonzo's home town ~ http://www.bravewords.com/news/204843 and Bonzo Bash ~

https://www.facebook.com/notes/bonzo-bash/marshallnatalmodern-drummer-presents-bonzo-birthday-bash-east-coast-invasion/308218005982510 hitting New York and New Jersey to a thunderous reception.As well as our own memories and thoughts.

attachicon.gif20121120-johnbonham-x306-1353425887.jpg attachicon.gifjohn_bonham_17302.jpg

John Henry Bonham,remembered fondly and with deep respect.

31-5-48 ~ 25-9-80

.....Happy Birthday !!!, indeed, his colorful and skillful existence remains incomparable....

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Happy Birthday Bonzo, keep rocking up there!

10048_470329026380840_1396765375_n.jpg

Edited by SozoZoso

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Looking back the Fall/Winter of 1980 was pretty rough.....

I was in 8th grade (Chicago suburbs) at the time & school had just started. I remember hearing about his passing the next day at school. Being only in 8th grade I did not know much about Led Zeppelin - but that all changed after the 25th of September that year.

How sad that only a few months later we'd lose John Lennon too. I'd be interested in hearing from folks from that generation. With the loss of Bonzo & Lennon.... what were your thoughts - did you think the whole world had gone to hell, did you hold on to any hope for the future of music in the 1980's?? Thanks!

RIP Bonzo bless you

1980 was the worst year of my life for several reasons. When I heard John Bonham had died, I wasn't surprised, and felt like it was just one more sign that yes, the world, or mine anyway, was going to hell. I did not see a future for rock music. I had sensed for a couple of years that Led Zeppelin was not going to last, but I didn't think any of the other bands were going to last either. If you had told me then that the Rolling Stones would be putting out albums in the 90s and going on tour in the 21st century, I would not have believed it. Music was changing, people had been listening to disco and the last guitar-based band that seemed to be any good had been Van Halen in 1978. I had mixed feelings about punk. I remember very clearly how I found out Lennon had died; I was at boarding school at breakfast and overheard someone talking about bad news and I knew instantly that someone had died, someone important to us. The fact that he had been murdered indicated to me a continuing deterioration of society and I wasn't wrong. The late 70s had seen double digit inflation and the Iran hostage crisis, but it was in the 1980s that our society really began to deteriorate, with a widening gap between rich and poor and a growing ethos of greed.

I saw "Bonzo Bash" listed at Gramercy Theater which is right in my neighborhood, but wasn't sure what it was. They don't do a good job of publicity.

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1980 was the worst year of my life for several reasons. When I heard John Bonham had died, I wasn't surprised, and felt like it was just one more sign that yes, the world, or mine anyway, was going to hell. I did not see a future for rock music. I had sensed for a couple of years that Led Zeppelin was not going to last, but I didn't think any of the other bands were going to last either. If you had told me then that the Rolling Stones would be putting out albums in the 90s and going on tour in the 21st century, I would not have believed it. Music was changing, people had been listening to disco and the last guitar-based band that seemed to be any good had been Van Halen in 1978. I had mixed feelings about punk. I remember very clearly how I found out Lennon had died; I was at boarding school at breakfast and overheard someone talking about bad news and I knew instantly that someone had died, someone important to us. The fact that he had been murdered indicated to me a continuing deterioration of society and I wasn't wrong. The late 70s had seen double digit inflation and the Iran hostage crisis, but it was in the 1980s that our society really began to deteriorate, with a widening gap between rich and poor and a growing ethos of greed.

I saw "Bonzo Bash" listed at Gramercy Theater which is right in my neighborhood, but wasn't sure what it was. They don't do a good job of publicity.

The Replacements just came into rotation on my iTunes library - & that's one of the good things to come from the 1980's - Not sure if there are a lot of Joy Division fan's here but we also lost Ian Curits in 1980 (& Bon Scott)... Wonder what their thoughts on a band like JD were.... at least its TGIF!

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Sam, the fantastic pic you have posted of John and Jason appears to be from late summer 1980. Do you have an estimated date of the photo?

Thanks

from Jason....

attachicon.gifjohn_jason.jpg

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Thanks to Jason for the photo and Sam for sharing.

John Henry Bonham has have left a beautiful legacy with his family..and an extended family in a sense who also is part of that legacy. I am posting this video out of the highest respect as that is my intention. Happy Birthday Bonzo!

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I'm trying to picture him, had he made it to 65. No beard or mustache. Grey hair, short, still has all his hair (I think that skips a generation, right? sorry Jason :-)) Clean, mostly-sober, a happy farmer. Still has killer chops. Still rockin' a 26" kick. Man, I better stop, I'm getting something in my eye. Happy Birthday, Bonzo! What was that great Plantation? "To the man who said he could always go back to laying bricks, and we all agreed - John Henry Bonham!"

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I have watched videos and listened to John Bonham most of the day. As great as Robert, Jimmy, and JPJ all are, I really think it was Bonzo's drumming that was by relative comparison, so much better than anything else in comparison to the bands of their era, or any other. How many other bands do you find yourself routinely stopping to focus on specifically the drumming.. and yet, with Led Zeppelin, there are very few songs where the drums aren't just there to hold the rhythm, they are literally defining the sound of the song. Aside from the amazing versions of Moby Dick I have relived today, can you imagine Dazed and Confused, Good Times Bad Times, Whole Lotta Love, Heartbreaker, Rock and Roll, Misty Mountain Hop, Four Sticks, When The Levee Breaks, Kashmir, The Song Remains The Same, Achilles Last Stand, Nobody's Fault But MIne, Fool In the Rain, or dozens of other tracks without his drumming? Even less obvious choices like Your Time is Gonna Come, You Shook Me, Ramble On, Bring It On Home, Out On the Tiles, Bron Yr-Aur Stomp, Stairway to Heaven, Dancing Days, D'Yer Maker, Black Country Woman, Ten Years Gone, Hots on For Nowhere, and All of My Love are made so much more unique, imaginative and impactful with John's drumbeat. One of my favorite Bonham memories was the first time I listened to Swan Song. It sounded OK when it started, but I was mildly skeptical about whether this was a legit "lost" LZ song. This skepticism increased when the bass came in, for to me, it sounded a bit unlike a typical Jones bass line, mainly in tone. However, when Bonzo kicked on drums, I got chills and a really warm feeling all at once, like he had come back to play just one more song for us. His music means more to me than I can say. Happy Birthday John Henry Bonham, you are so very sorely missed around the entire world.

Edited by MonkeyOnMyBack

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Sam, the fantastic pic you have posted of John and Jason appears to be from late summer 1980. Do you have an estimated date of the photo?

Thanks

According to the photo specs, it appears to have been taken in May 1976.

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According to the photo specs, it appears to have been taken in May 1976.

I must have mistaken Jason for looking a little older in that photo.

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The life and times of Led Zep driving force Bonzo: He was dubbed the "godfather" of rock drumming and he would have been 65 today. To mark the date, the Mail looks at the colourful life of Led Zeppelin legend John Bonham - through the eyes of his kid brother Mick.

Birmingham Mail [birmingham (UK)] 31 May 2013:

THE young John Bonham had the face of an angel - but could already make a noise capable of waking the dead.

He came into the world on May 31, 1948, weighing 10lbs 4oz and his passion for drumming was soon in evidence. His brother Mick, whose family lived in Redditch, wrote: "John was two years older than me, and this angelic-looking little lad would take me on some great nights - and get me into some hard fights.

"As the first few years passed, I noticed that John had a passion for hitting things - biscuit tins, sweet boxes and anything else that made a sound.

"What made this a particularly fretful period for me was the discovery that I, too, was included in John's make-believe drum kit.

"But here it was, the start of the drumming career of John 'Bonzo' Bonham."

Fast forward to the 1960s and John, desperate to make a career in music, knew he needed to be part of the wave of bands creating the sound of Birmingham. He performed with an act called The Senators, who contributed to a 1964 album titled Brum Beat, made up of local talent.

And John's ventures into the big city led him to an aspiring singer called Robert Plant.

Mick, who still shared a bedroom with John, recalled: "Most nights he'd tell me stories about Birmingham from behind blurry eyes.

"The aim of most bands playing in Brum was to get on the 'circuit', the name given to venues owned by the Reagan family.

"These included The Cavern, Old Hall Plaza, Handsworth Plaza and The Ritz in Kings Heath."

Mick wrote how he would never forget meeting Plant for the first time - because he mistook him for Jesus.

"Robert was a blues man with an unusual but powerful voice, that impressed John," he remembered.

"Though their first get-together didn't last very long, I did get to meet Robert, although it scared the s**t out of me.

"I'd been fast asleep late one night when John brought Robert back to our house.

"My bedroom door was open when Robert came upstairs to use the toilet and, by mistake, came into my bedroom.

"I awoke to see a silhouette of what I thought was Jesus.

"With the long curly hair he looked just like the pictures I'd seen at Sunday school and immediately thought He had come for me."

John's big break was a while coming - he even planned to sell his drum kit at one stage - but his love life was blossoming and he married Pat Phillips on February 19, 1966.

The couple lived at her family's home on Dudley's Priory Estate and then his parents' house in Redditch - even moving into a caravan in the gar-den when their son Jason arrived.

John's life changed forever in 1968 when Jimmy Page recruited Plant to help form the New Yardbirds and he recommended his mate from the Midlands. With John Paul Jones also in tow, the quartet went on tour - and ended up under the name Led Zepellin.

Mick wrote: "John was like a kid with a new toy.

"He was so excited about the band, the tour and the fact that maybe, just maybe, his dream of making it might be coming true."

And come true it did, with a succession of huge releases and tours breaking box office records as they went.

Mick wrote of his memories in a book marking the life of his brother, who died on September 25, 1980, aged just 32, signalling the end of the band. An inquest heard John inhaled his own vomit after drinking 40 measures of vodka in just 12 hours.

Tragically, Mick himself died suddenly, aged just 49, in January 2000, after completing the first re-write of the title, John Bonham The Powerhouse Behind Led Zeppelin.

The anguish of John's loss was clear as he recalled how Plant broke the news.

"I don't know how to explain the impact his words had on me in that split-second and how I felt afterwards," Mick wrote.

"The only thing I knew was that the brother I loved so much, my lifelong hero, was gone.

"What more is there to say? Only that we try to deal with the devastation of his death on a day-to-day basis."

Mick's book is published by Southbank Publishing.

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