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icantquityoubabe
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This is GREAT news! As Rolling Stone reports, 'Stones insiders' have told about serious plans for some gigs later this and of cause also next year. But Keith himself is also quoted. After all the letdowns, blown up rumours and (even official) denials, now at last we have some more serious stuff to think about!

First: the Stones still think about one or maybe more gigs this year to mark their 50th anniversary. Keith says: "I'd like to get a couple of shows down and see how it goes [...] But I'd love it."

Second: The same holds true for plans about a tour next year.

Their last rehearsals in April this year Weehawken, New Jersey (see below), were fvery relaxed and joyful. According to Brett Morgen, who is the director of a documentary and who was invited to film the event to shoot footage for a documentary celebrating the group's anniversary, the Stones ran through "Beast of Burden" "Respectable" "Fool to Cry" and "Gimme Shelter", among other classics, and they were "extremely tight".

Keith is quoted saying: "
I thought I'd be quite rusty, after all we hadn't done it for a while, five years or something. But it sounded as fresh as you could hope for. It was a great week.
"

Third: in July, the Stones will meet in London to discuss further live performances and even the possibillity of new songs for a maybe new album!

Keith: "
It's all very hush-hush, ... I'm going over to London for a bit, so I'll find out more then.

We're going to talk about that in July and see. I mean, I'd love to get some tracks down and see what songs we've got. And that goes along with part of getting the band back together and getting things moving. So I'd love to cut some tracks, yeah.
"

Cheek to cheek with Mick?
"
Oh, yeah, I have no doubt.
"

Courtesy of stonesnews.com

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here is a list of releases, projects and exhibits related to the Rolling Stones' 50th anniversary. Those that have an asterisk have been officially authorized/endorsed by the band. Most of the books are photo books.

Books

  • "The Rolling Stones: 50" by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ron Wood (U.S. release: October 30, 2012; U.K. release: July 12, 2012)*

  • "The Rolling Stones: 50 Years of Rock 'n' Roll" by Editors of Life (U.S. release: May 15, 2012; U.K. release: June 13, 2012)

  • "Rolling Stones 50 x 20" by Chris Murray, Chris Salewicz and Richard Harrington (U.S. release: September 18, 2012; U.K. release: August 14, 2012)

  • "Rolling Stones: 50 Years of Rock" by Howard Kramer (U.S. release: October 10, 2011; U.K. release: October 29, 2011)

  • "50 Licks: Myths and Stories from Half a Century of the Rolling Stones" by Bernard M. Corbett and Peter Fornatale (U.S. and U.K. release: February 19, 2013)

  • "The Rolling Stones: Fifty Years" by Christopher Sandford (U.S. release: June 1, 2012; U.K. release: April 26, 2012)

  • "The Rolling Stones: Complete Recording Sessions 1962-2012: 50th Anniversary Edition" by Martin Elliott (U.S. release: November 1, 2012; U.K. release: July 12, 2012)

Documentaries

  • A movie (title to be announced) directed by Brett Morgen will have a limited release in cinemas in September 2012, on a date to be announced. The movie will be released on DVD/Blu-ray by Eagle Rock Entertainment in October or November 2012, on a date to be announced.*

  • There is an unconfirmed rumor that there will be a made-for-TV Rolling Stones 50th anniversary documentary, but so far there has been no official information about this project.

Gallery Exhibits

  • "The Rolling Stones" - May 3 to June 3, 2012, at the Analogue Gallery, 673 Queen Street West in Toronto.

  • "Rolling Stones: Celebrating 50 Years in Photography" - May 4 to May 31, 2012, at the Morrison Hotel Gallery, 124 Prince Street in New York City.

  • "Jim Marshall: The Rolling Stones and Beyond" - July 5 to September 8, 2012, at the Steven Kasher Gallery, 521 West 23rd Street in New York City.

  • "The Rolling Stones: 50" - July 13 to August 27, 2012, at Somerset House, south side of the Strand, Convent Garden, in London.

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Books

  • "The Rolling Stones: 50" by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ron Wood (U.S. release: October 30, 2012; U.K. release: July 12, 2012)*

  • "The Rolling Stones: 50 Years of Rock 'n' Roll" by Editors of Life (U.S. release: May 15, 2012; U.K. release: June 13, 2012)

  • "Rolling Stones 50 x 20" by Chris Murray, Chris Salewicz and Richard Harrington (U.S. release: September 18, 2012; U.K. release: August 14, 2012)

  • "Rolling Stones: 50 Years of Rock" by Howard Kramer (U.S. release: October 10, 2011; U.K. release: October 29, 2011)

  • "50 Licks: Myths and Stories from Half a Century of the Rolling Stones" by Bernard M. Corbett and Peter Fornatale (U.S. and U.K. release: February 19, 2013)

  • "The Rolling Stones: Fifty Years" by Christopher Sandford (U.S. release: June 1, 2012; U.K. release: April 26, 2012)

  • "The Rolling Stones: Complete Recording Sessions 1962-2012: 50th Anniversary Edition" by Martin Elliott (U.S. release: November 1, 2012; U.K. release: July 12, 2012)

A book by Christopher Andersen is cited on news.com.au:

"MICK Jagger was so obsessed with Angelina Jolie he bombarded her with phone calls begging to see her, a new book claims.

Excerpts of Christopher Andersen's MICK: The Wild Life and Mad Genius of Jagger have surfaced online and they paint a disturbing picture of the Rolling Stones frontman.

Jagger reportedly fell for Jolie in 1997 after she played a stripper in a video for the band's song Anybody Seen My Baby.

Read more: http://www.news.com.au/entertainment/celebrity/angelina-jolie-reduced-mick-jagger-to-tears/story-e6frfmqi-1226421385150#ixzz20D4TxQGk

"

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Here is a list of releases, projects and exhibits related to the Rolling Stones' 50th anniversary. Those that have an asterisk have been officially authorized/endorsed by the band. Most of the books are photo books.

In addition to the news provided by SAJ, I wanted to give the heads up that it was in the Sun (UK) newspaper on 9/07/2012 that the Stones are due to attend the opening of this exhibition in London on 12 July, before it opens to the public on the 13th. The exhibition from 13/07 to 27/08 is Free Admission.

Also detailed below is the Thames & Hudson book released to coincide with this anniversary year, at the affordable price of £29.95.

The Rolling Stones: 50

13 July - 27 August 2012

Daily 10.00-18.00

East Wing Galleries, East Wing

Free admission

On 12 July 1962 the Rolling Stones went on stage for the first time at the Marquee Club in London’s Oxford Street. A phenomenal 50 years later, and to celebrate this milestone, a free photographic exhibition documenting the last half-century will occupy the East Wing Galleries, looking back at their astounding career.

With privileged access to a wealth of unseen and rare material, this one-off exhibition

will include over seventy prints ranging from reportage photography, live concert and

studio session images, to contact sheets, negative strips and outtakes from every

period of the band’s history – from performing in the smallest blues clubs to the

biggest stadium tours of all time.

Limited edition prints, copies of the book and other items will be available to buy.

This exhibition coincides with the release of the book by the same name, published by Thames & Hudson @ £29.95.

Edited by kenog
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The 50 year anniversary of the Rolling Stones performing together for the very first time will happen on July 12, 2012.

"Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Brian Jones played The Marquee Club on July 12, 1962 with three others, the first time they performed under the band name which would become synonymous worldwide with excess and musical flair."

http://www.japantoda...n-50-years-on-2

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I just saw on my local news channel that today The Rolling Stones comemorate 50 years of existence. Because I love them and I want to keep them going , today I will only listen to their albums and won't listen to any onther bands.

Thanks for 50 years of Music and Drug tabloids. :)

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The Rolling Stones played first gig 50 years ago

120712-rolling-stones-50th.380;380;7;70.jpg

Reuters

The Rolling Stones' Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood and Charlie Watts pose in front of The Marquee Club in London, where they first performed live 50 years ago.

By Patrick Doyle, Rolling Stone

"It is quite amazing when you think about it," Mick Jagger recently told Rolling Stone, reflecting on the 50th anniversary of the Rolling Stones first show on July 12th, 1962 at London's Marquee Jazz Club. "But it was so long ago. Some of us are still here, but it's a very different group than the one that played 50 years ago."

On that summer night in 1962, the Rollin' Stones were Jagger on vocals, guitarists Brian Jones and Keith Richards, pianist Ian Stewart and bassist Dick Taylor. The drummer is up for debate; some fans contend it was their frequent early drummer, Tony Chapman, but Richards insisted in his 2012 memoir "Life" that it was friend Mick Avory. The Stones got the gig when Alexis Korner's Blues Incorporated – the club's Thursday night regulars fronted by Jagger – were invited to play a BBC live broadcast. Jagger didn't take part in the broadcast, and Jones persuaded Marquee club owner Harold Pendleton to let their new group fill in. When Jones called local listings paper Jazz News to advertise the gig, the famous story goes, he was asked what the band was called. His eyes went straight to the first song on the nearby LP "The Best of Muddy Waters": "Rollin' Stone."

The band borrowed money from Jagger's dad to rent equipment for the gig. In "Life," Richards recalled playing songs like "Dust My Broom," "Confessin' the Blues" and "Got My Mojo Working." "You're sitting with some guys, and you're playing and you go, 'Ooh yeah!' That feeling is worth more than anything," he wrote. "There's a certain moment when you realize that you've actually left the planet for a bit and that nobody can touch you … it's flying without a license."

The band continued to play around London clubs that summer. In August, Jagger, Richards and Jones moved into a grimy second-floor apartment at 102 Edith Grove in Fulham, living amongst dirty dishes, two beds and no furniture. Soon, Charlie Watts moved in. "The Rolling Stones spent the first year of their life hanging places, stealing food and rehearsing," Richards remembered. "We were paying to be the Rolling Stones."

Today, Jagger admits feeling uneasy about celebrating the milestone. "One part of me goes, 'We're slightly cheating,'" he says. "Because it's not the same band, you know. Still the same name. It's only Keith and myself that are the same people, I think. I've tried to find out when Charlie's first gig was, and none of us can really remember and no one really knows. But it's an amazing achievement, and I think it's fantastic and you know I'm very proud of it."

Richards is less reflective. "Man, I don't count!" he says with a laugh. "The Stones always really consider '63 to be 50 years, because Charlie didn't actually join until January. So we look upon 2012 as sort of the year of conception. But the birth is next year."

On Wednesday, the Stones met at the Marquee Club to shoot an anniversary photo. And while they might look a little worse for wear and tear than they did 50 years ago, they haven't lost any cool. After more than 400 songs, over two-dozen studio albums, ten mega-tours, turmoil and countless public squabbles, they look dangerous and commanding as ever, still capable of giving crowds more satisfaction than any band 50 years their junior.

Richards says the band will discuss recording new material during their London stay, and the band is strongly considering at least one gig this year, while a tour is more likely next year. Here's hoping it all happens. As Pete Townshend told the band while inducting them in to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989, "Guys, whatever you do, don't grow old gracefully. It wouldn't suit you."

Here is what the Stones played on that night in 1962, according to meticulous, setlist-documenting Stones fansite It's Only Rock and Roll – though the setlist differs slightly from Richards' memory of the show described in "Life."

1. "Kansas City"

2. "Baby What's Wrong"

3. "Confessin' the Blues"

4. "Bright Lights, Big City"

5. "Dust My Broom"

6. "Down the Road Apiece"

7. "I'm a Love You"

8. "Bad Boy"

9. "I Ain't Got You"

10. "Hush-Hush"

11. "Ride 'Em on Down"

12. "Back in the U.S.A."

13. "Kind of Lonesome"

14. "Blues Before Sunrise"

15. "Big Boss Man"

16. "Don't Stay Out All Night"

17. "Tell Me You Love Me"

18. "Happy Home"

http://entertainment.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/07/12/12701726-the-rolling-stones-played-first-gig-50-years-ago

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Since Major Major apparently shut down the Movie thread(his is the last post and every time I attempted to go to that thread it self-destructed to the point where I had to reboot my connection), I'll post this here.

In honour of the Rolling Stones 50th anniversary of their first gig, tonight(July 12) the American Cinematheque screened "Gimme Shelter", the Maysles Brothers film of the Stones' 1969 U.S. tour and the Altamont apocalypse. I always like to see it on the big screen when I can, and as it had been some time since I had, this seemed the perfect occasion to do so.

More than 40 years on, this film still has a power nearly unmatched among rock documentaries...don't even try to put "The Song Remains the Same" in its class. It's not even in the conversation. If only Peter Grant had gotten the Maysles brothers to film the 1973(or any other year) tour.

Mesmerizing, intense, frightening, disturbing...it's a good thing I didn't see this until I was in high school. If I had seen it when it was first released I probably would have been too scared to go see the Rolling Stones in concert in 1972. Hell, just reading about Altamont in Rolling Stone magazine, and other media outlets, was creepy enough...but there was just enough distance to the event itself that I could rationalize away any trepidation or fear. When you watch "Gimme Shelter" though, that distance is erased. There is no escaping the apocalyptic horror of Altamont...the look of terror and bewilderment on the faces of the audience, the menace and malevolence of the Hell's Angels, the pathetic attempts by the musicians to calm the crowd.

There is a revealing sequence during "Sympathy for the Devil", where you see audience members crying and pleading with Mick Jagger to do something, anything, to stop the violence erupting around them. All Mick can think to do at that point is dance away to another part of the stage...it's like Mick looked into the abyss and for the first time realized the forces of darkness he had unleashed and how he was powerless to control them. Faced with this unfamiliar feeling, he could only revert to what he knew best...to shake his ass and mug for the crowd. In this way, you see him trying to convince himself that all is well..."what can a poor boy do 'cept to sing for a rock and roll band". Watch his face as "Sympathy" comes to a close as he leers and teases the audience like he's done a hundred times before, and you can detect a slight glimmer that he doesn't really convince himself...or the audience. He has no control over anything...the Hell's Angels own the stage and the environs.

I have a bootleg tape of the entire Altamont performance and besides painting a clear and correct chronological order to the violence and the crowd's increasing anger at the Hell's Angels(at the point of the concert where Mick asks "Who's fighting and what for?", on my bootleg tape you can clearly hear the audience shout "it's the Hell's Angels". Even more creepy is the fact that you can occasionally hear the thumps of the pool sticks hitting some poor guy in the crowd. How the taper maintained his poise and position while this was going on is a miracle), it shows that while chaos reigned around them, somehow the Stones pulled it together enough to give one of their best concerts of the '69 tour. In fact, after Meredith Hunter's murder during "Under My Thumb", there don't seem to be any more incidents the rest of the show.

Watching the credits at the end, which is always easier at a theatre than watching on TV, I was struck by how many familiar names pop up. I knew George Lucas was one of the camera operators...but apparently his footage was deemed unusable by the Maysleys. But also operating cameras were Elliott Erwitt and Gary Weiss. And Walter Murch was one of the sound guys.

There's an interesting link to Pauline Kael's infamous review and the filmmakers response to her accusations here: http://www.mayslesfilms.com/films/films/gimmeshelter.html

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Some shows in the autumn apparently: http://www.nme.com/news/the-rolling-stones/64919

If Bill Wyman's back in the fold I'd really be tempted to go, the only thing is the price. Back when I saw them in Twickenham in 2006 the ticket I got was £90, given the recent surge in the price of concert tickets I dread to think how much they'll cost now. They always do put on a killer show though and it was definitely money well spent in 2006.

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  • 1 month later...

The Rolling Stones: London & Brooklyn Shows!

The Rolling Stones will reportedly play four dates in November, two at London's O2 Arena and two at the Barclay's Center in Brooklyn.

Richard Branson and Australian promoter Paul Dainty will promote, and the Rolling Stones will be paid $25 million for the four shows.

I am anticipating an official announcement of a new album and/or these four concert dates next Tuesday.

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LONDON — The Rolling Stones say they are releasing a documentary that traces their band’s colorful 50-year journey.

The film, titled "Crossfire Hurricane," is due for release in some British cinemas in October.

It will feature historical footage and commentaries by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Ronnie Wood and former Stones Bill Wyman and Mick Taylor.

Director Brett Morgen said in a statement Thursday that the film is "not an academic history lesson" but invites the audience to experience "the Stones’ nearly mythical journey from outsiders to rock and roll royalty."

The documentary also will be shown later this year on HBO and the BBC.

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If Bill Wyman and Mick Taylor aren't involved, I have no interest in seeing the Stones again. I've seen them enough in my lifetime. I never need to hear "Start Me Up" or "Satisfaction" in concert again.

Even if both were involved affordable tickets for any of these four shows may prove impossible to find. Tentative pricing plans I've seen call for tickets at $500.00 and up.

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Even if both were involved affordable tickets for any of these four shows may prove impossible to find. Tentative pricing plans I've seen call for tickets at $500.00 and up.

:ohmy:

Christ that's pricey!

Can't say I'm surprised though, they were charging £125 for the best seats in 2006 and given the sudden surge in concert ticket prices I expected a much bigger price than the '06 price.

No way I could justify spending £300+ on a concert ticket, no one's that good. And if that's "and up" then £300+ for nosebleed seats is crazy. Surprised people would buy them at that price.

Edited by Hand_Of_Omega_91
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