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Rolling Stones Thread

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Officially Announced:

21 FEBRUARY

ABU DHABI, UAE

DU ARENA, YAS ISLAND

Pre-Sale: Monday 9 December 12pm Local

On-sale: Thursday 12 December 12pm Local

26 FEBRUARY

TOKYO, JAPAN

TOKYO DOME

Primary Sale: Wednesday 4 December

On-Sale: Saturday 18 January

4 MARCH

TOKYO, JAPAN

TOKYO DOME

Primary Sale: Wednesday 4 December

On-sale: Saturday 18 January

6 MARCH

TOKYO, JAPAN

TOKYO DOME

Primary Sale: Wednesday 4 December

On-sale: Saturday 18 January

9 MARCH

MACAU

COTAI ARENA

Pre-Sale: Thursday 5 December 10am Local

On-Sale: Friday 6 December 10am Local

19 MARCH

PERTH, AUSTRALIA

ARENA

Pre-Sale: Monday 9 December 3pm Local

On-sale: Monday 16 December 9am Local

22 MARCH

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA

OVAL

Sold Out

25 MARCH

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA

ALLPHONES ARENA

Pre-Sale: Monday 9 December 3pm Local

On-sale: Monday 16 December 9am Local

28 MARCH

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

ROD LAVER ARENA

Pre-Sale: Monday 9 December 4pm Local

On-sale: Monday 16 December 9am Local

30 MARCH

MACEDON RANGES, AUSTRALIA

HANGING ROCK

Pre-Sale: Monday 9 December 2pm Local

On-sale: Monday 16 December 9am Local

2 APRIL

BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA

ENTERTAINMENT CENTRE

Pre-Sale: Monday 9 December 4pm Local

On-sale: Monday 16 December 9am Local

5 APRIL

AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND

MOUNT SMART STADIUM

Edited by SteveAJones

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Steve, are you going along to any of the Tokyo Dome shows?

I'm giving serious consideration to February 26th.

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Steve, are you going along to any of the Tokyo Dome shows?

I'm giving serious consideration to February 26th.

Yes, absolutely. I do plan to attend at least one of the three dates in Tokyo. Normally I choose to attend tour finales, unless it's an artist or group I feel compelled to see every night. Mind you, I could go the 26th, as I'd certainly enjoy catching all three nights however the Tokyo Dome is my least favorite venue here. Budokan is superior to Tokyo Dome in every way but too small for staging of this show.

If you do make the trip over be sure to get the best possible seats. Tongue pit seating or anywhere near center main floor will do. Avoid the extreme side tiers as unlike the UK venues in the Tokyo Dome you'll feel like they're performing in another zip code. If you need any help arranging your hotel, transport or securing tickets let me know via PM or offsite.

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Thanks Steve. If I do make it over there I won't be going for expensive seats. I've been on a mission the last couple of years to see the Stones with as little as possible milked from my bank account!

I managed to get a ticket for less than half price for the O2 last year, and for £100 I was about 20 metres from the stage at Hyde Park last summer.

I've seen them close up quite a few times over the years, don't mind seeing them from a distance this time, assuming I get there. This depends to a large extent on the other half; February 26th is her birthday.

If I do get there, I'm hoping we can meet for a drink beforehand...also hoping I get to meet a fellow Who fan I've never seen in person yet...

Lee

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If I do get there, I'm hoping we can meet for a drink beforehand.

Lee

How kind of you to suggest. I'll look forward to it.

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Thanks for posting the link Ross62. The "blue" photo of Keith is great. I enjoyed reading his description of how he "strikes" his guitar strings.

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Thanks for posting the link Ross62. The "blue" photo of Keith is great. I enjoyed reading his description of how he "strikes" his guitar strings.

My pleasure,jb 126.That part was of interest to me too along with the whole story.

I's heard KR's description of how he used the Philips portable recorder before but that article goes into much more detail.

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My pleasure,jb 126.That part was of interest to me too along with the whole story.

I's heard KR's description of how he used the Philips portable recorder before but that article goes into much more detail.

Yes, and for me, sometimes I can't understand half of what he's saying in a video interview...this was great reading.

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Yes, and for me, sometimes I can't understand half of what he's saying in a video interview...this was great reading.

Keith's not always easy to understand in interviews but to me he's always entertaining.

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Getting my Stones fix on right now with this 12 CD boxed set I purchased last weekend:

RollingStonesFrontRowFront.jpg

RollingStonesFrontRowBack.jpg

Scans courtesy Steve A. Jones Archive

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KEEF IS 70! Happy Birthday Keith Richards!

Here's to the man who takes a licking and keeps on rocking...the man who will outlive us all! Thanks for the tunes and the 'tude!

post-1470-0-16598100-1387404769_thumb.jp

Photo by Ethan Russell

And happy birthday to Keith's good ol' sidekick from Texas, Bobby Keys!

Edited by Strider

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The Rolling Stones: Triple M Australia Radio Interviews

December 4 & 13, 2013

Edited by SteveAJones

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Blocked Rolling Stones documentary exposes the sadness behind fame

GEOFF PEVERE

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jan. 16 2014, 5:00 PM EST

Nothing looms quite like something you can’t see, and in the 42 years since Robert Frank shot his vérité documentary account of the Rolling Stones’ North American tour of 1972, CS Blues has taken on the aura of a darkly magical and mysterious forbidden artifact. Blocked from release by the band, the film – by the renowned Beat-era Swiss still photographer who had designed the photo collage cover of Exile on Main St. – is possibly the most bootlegged, sought-after and, it now seems, misunderstood film in rock-movie history.

It is permitted only single screenings once a year in cities where the filmmaker has been present – although Frank, now 89, is not expected to appear at the Toronto screening, presented as part of the TIFF Cinematheque’s Free Screen series today at 6:30 p.m. at the Bell Lightbox. Captured with Frank’s deftly unobtrusive 16-millimetre camera, CS Blues takes its full, proper title (which sounds a lot like Cork Shucker Blues) and its tone from a song about dissolute gay hustling that Mick Jagger composed to render null the band’s contract with Decca Records.

If the song, never officially released, occupies the mournful place where desire has been corrupted, hope abandoned and the soul ruined by the body’s wholesale surrender to fleeting pleasure, CS Blues is that state configured as one of the most beautifully listless, dreamily anesthetized and utterly un-sensational rock docs ever made. Rampant drug use, wanton groupie abuse and gratuitously defenestrated hotel TV sets notwithstanding, Frank’s movie is about fame as a supreme drag and protracted state of existential limbo. It is a condition best captured by the recurring sight of a junked-out Keith Richards nodding off into habitual oblivion.

Since arriving on the mid-fifties global cultural scene with The Americans, a book of photographs that depicted Eisenhower’s domestic empire as a sprawling kingdom of grim flyover loneliness, Frank had become famous for his jaundiced but immaculate stranger’s-eye view of the United States. This was precisely what his lens regarded when the Rolling Stones embarked on their first American tour since the 1969 debacle (so famously captured in Gimme Shelter, by Albert and David Maysles) at Altamont Speedway, at which a fan was killed, on camera, by Hells Angels security goons.

If that movie marked the end of the myth of the Stones as a people’s rock band – or, as has been widely suggested, the end of the sixties dream of peaceful, universal co-existence – CS Blues is a cold report from the other side of the castle wall: This is what living inside the fame fortress is really like, where insulation from fans, immersion in perpetual indulgence, and life lived as a holding pattern between performances – which were, it must be said, as exciting as any in rock history – seemingly verifies the Devil’s pact inSympathy for the Devil, where the price of fame, wealth and beauty is the soul laid to waste.

If the Stones were horrified by what they saw – and that’s how the story goes – what is now clearer than ever is that they were right to be, and not because of the cheaply sensational images of naked groupies, Mick playing trouser billiards, or drugs being consumed at an industrial level. It’s because their lives look so pathetically, fundamentally and irredeemably sad. Whether it’s Richards perpetually nodding off, Jagger’s world-class yawn or Bianca’s transfixed stare at a music box, the story told here is of the living death that fame imposes; and the revelation, much more subversive than smack or groupie sex, that it sucks to be a Stone.

Unfolding largely in such transient zones as hotel rooms, dressing rooms, airports, airplanes and lobbies, and fleetingly visited by such period celebrity pilot fish as Andy Warhol, Truman Capote, Dick Cavett and Lee Radziwill, this account of a Stone’s life circa ’72 is a gorgeously rendered, vaporously grainy, sustained stupor of a movie. It is a neglected high point of its particular documentary style, a radical subversion of rock mythology and a lingeringly unsettling work of art.

At the age of 15, I’d have traded my youngest sibling into white slavery in order to see it, but that was when I’d have confused it for a movie about my favourite band on Earth. And it would have disappointed if not crushed me, as the Stones knew when they threw down the block to its release. It was the last movie about themselves they wanted anyone to see, let alone those who wished to be one of them. Along with Nixon’s tapes, CS Blues was 1972’s other great act of omission.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/film/blocked-rolling-stones-documentary-exposes-the-sadness-behind-fame/article16367956/?cmpid=rss1

Edited by SteveAJones

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