Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Sign in to follow this  
The Dark Lord

What Was The Most Important Zeppelin Album?

Recommended Posts

What staggers me is that the rate these classic LP's were released. Just under a three year period and four albums. They expanded their sound; explored multiple themes; their song-writing, production, lyrics everything is pushing the boundaries and they are creating an amazing stage prescience. Even the later work is strong and arguable more consistent that their contemporaries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me it's got to be the fourth album. By then the Zeppelin had arrived and yet they managed to step it a notch or three. This album changed the formula of rock music, integrated blues, folk and progressive which really ushered in the 70's sound. The level of musicianship and song writing is unmatched to this day. Side one: Black Dog, Rock and Roll, The Battle of Evermore, AND Stairway to Heaven!?!?! I can't think of another album side by ANY band that was such pure gold. Each of those songs is STILL in constant radio play!

Edited by chef free

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Led Zeppelin, Led Zeppelin II and Presence

Led zeppelin I, because it came from Page's own pocket and has become one of Rocks most important albums ever.

Led Zeppelin II, because it shows that they weren't just one hit wonders

Presence because as Jimmy says, it shows that they can continue no matter what happens. As long as each member is well, Zeppelin will continue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand the arguments for Led Zeppelin II - had that sucked, the momentum could've/would've been derailed
and who knows what would've happened.

So II was crucial.

But I'd just give the edge to Led Zeppelin IV.

Robert once said something to the effect that 'people heard Led Zeppelin III and went what are we supposed to do with this?!'
For a brief period, things might have faltered.
So IV was definitely the right album at the right time.

Like II, IV took Zeppelin even higher - but it also swept away doubters and changed the game to the extent that, afterwards, the band could do anything they wanted without it having any negative effects on their fanbase/career.
For that extra knock-on effect, I'd say IV was the most important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I vote for LZ II. The first album made it to 10 on Billboard 200 and established the band as capable of writing great music and offering impressive performances. The second album produced some of their most iconic hits and pushed them to number one. Every album following II made it to #1 on Billboard. I'm not basing my entire theory on the Top 200 chart but most people can't name a song from the first album but can name at least one if not more from the second.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It could be any of them. But Zepp I and II stick out to me. 'Led Zeppelin' because it was recorded in such a short amount of time all out of Jimmy's pocket and the music is so powerful. Good Times Bad Times is possibly one of the best numbers to kick off a debut album! It shows how many different types of music Zeppelin could do. Onto Zeppelin II. This album really cannoned them into becoming a really massive band. Whole Lotta Love been played on Top of the Pops through the 70's bought more people to their music. The opening riff, again like Good Times Bad Times was a cracking start to a record, and again showed how versatile they were. In my opinion, Zeppelin II would be the most important simply because I believe that is the album that really got them noticed!

Edited by BonzoFanatic4880

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Led Zeppelin I. It established the band as a force to be reckoned with and secured their creative autonomy. If it hadn't sold well, Atlantic may have pressured the band to work with other producers. IMO, Zep made a big mistake in not crediting the original songwriters where warranted. Had they been upfront about their borrowing, the critics would have spent less time wondering about the origins of a particular melody and more time appreciating Zep's reworking of it.

Edited by Disco Duck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Imo physical graffiti...it brought all the power of their first record on some songs and established them as artists on several levels of music...like their previous records did as well, but this record said it was grounded yet progressive and interested in being propelling. That album was all about the future in a way.

Edited by middlezep

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IV, it crystallized the band and defined them for a generation. Not only that, Stairway aside, it still holds up today with a perfect balance of metal and folk and it's stonking heavy blues climax.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great thread and I have thought about this for a while before sharing my thoughts. This is VERY difficult as I love them all and everyone has made really great points as to why they feel the way they do:-)

For me, I am going with Untitled(IV). I think this album put a solid lid on what would become IMHO the greatest Rock and Roll/Blues band. Of course without the previous three there would be no fourth. But that album is perfection to me.

Last Wednesday I went to visit some friends who live about 40 miles north of me. This is the friend who back in the late 60's toured with Bob Seger, opened for the James Gang and a few other great bands from that era. Well, they have a sound system throughout their home that is unbelievable! They also have a studio.They had already got the Zep albums and were ready for my visit (have to love friends like this). We were on one of their back patio/deck areas and we are so far up in the mountains that we are literally in the clouds. It it truly beautiful where they live. We spent the day talking about music and I was telling them about this thread (I know ridiculous!)

He chose the first album. She went off to play tennis or something and is not into the music as much as we are. As we continue to discuss this Stairway comes on (and I know a lot of people say it has been overplayed and so on), but I literally got chills as I sat there and watched the clouds slowly disappear and a full view of the mountains appeared. I knew right then that for me it was the Untited (IV) album. When you have heard a song more than any other song in your life and after 4 decades it can still stir emotions on a level that is just to hard to explain. STH is pardon me (a f***in) masterpiece...plus add Black Dog, Levee, forget about it.

I hope I did your thread justice and I really did have to think about this as I love them all. :peace:

Edited by Deborah J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read some where that Jimmy Page described the album Presence as the band's most important album, proving they would continue and succeed despite their turmoil going on in '76.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would have to say LZ I. Recorded in 30 hours by a band that had only been together for a few months. The band sound like they have been together for years. I recall how crazy the USA went for it despite the attempts by their 'music press' to rubbish it. I think that in its own way it had an impact like Sgt Pepper, it redefined just how powerful and and awe inspiring blues rock could be. I think that of all their albums, the first was like a sonic boom that shook everyone. Still sounds as fresh to me now as it did in 1969 and is the album I go back to the most.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Led Zeppelin". The first album.

Remember...Jimmy paid for the first album sessions out of his own pocket. He bet all he had on this gamble of his and if the album tanked, then not only would he be out of money, but also the band's confidence would have been shakened and maybe they would have been more susceptible to record company pressure to be more commercial and toe-the-line. The album's success gave the band carte blanche to do whatever they wanted, to follow any whim. As people often forget, "acoustic Led Zeppelin" didn't begin with Led Zeppelin III. "Black Mountain Side"and "Your Time Is Gonna Come" gave ample warning to the public that this wasn't your standard heavy rock band.

Let us also not forget the importance of how the first album sounded compared to other records of its day. The equal weight given to all the instruments and sonic elements, so that it sounded like a real band playing in your room as opposed to the guitar or vocals hogging all the sonic spectrum with all the other instruments squashed over to the side...which is how Jeff Beck's albums sounded like. The weight and force of the sound, especially the detail of the drums, and the way you heard the room ambience, would have far-reaching influence on the future of music production.

Bingo.

I actually busted out my scratchy old copy of the first album this weekend...I can't remember the last time I listened to the damned thing. And, fuck yeah, for the time period when it was recorded and released that was some heavy shit- Hendrix, Cream and Jeff Beck could only dream of sounding like that on record. Sounds stupid, maybe, but to my fourty seven year old ears, when played loud on big fucking speakers, Led Zeppelin almost sounds too heavy in spots :lol: Now, I'm not a fan of everything on the first album; "Your Time Is Gonna Come" and "I Can't Quit You Baby" are 'skippers' for me, always were, but when "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You" was on, I said, "Jesus- these guys already had their whole thing down by the second song on their first bloody album!". I laughed when Page's solo came on on "You Shook Me": "Hey, I never said the guy was sloppy in the studio!" I said to my wife. It's solos like that (especially the sound of Page's guitar) that make Jimmy Page one of the coolest fuckin' guitar players on the planet. For some reason, "Black Mountain Side" reminded me of Stephen Stills (the guitar tuning, maybe?) and some of his acoustic stuff. And "Communication Breakdown" is as perfect a three minute pop/rock song as you can get. I will admit, though I can't exactly put a finger on why, but hearing the studio take of "Dazed And Confused" just reminded me why I've never been too crazy about the song (never mind any goddamn fourty five minute live version!)...I thought they did "trippy freakout music" (I don't want to go so far as lay the pretentious "psychedelic" tag on it) much better on the "I was a young man, couldn't resist..." section of "How Many More Times". It's funny, but the first album does indeed sound like a "sixties" album (which makes sense) whereas the rest of their stuff either foreshadows or is entrenched in the sound of the 70's.

"Yeah," I said to my wife, "I think these guys are gonna go far."

To Jimmy Page: three thousand quid well spent, old chap!

Edited by Nutrocker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The question is what was the most important, not your favorite, or the best.

I too would have to say in the US it was IV. R&R, BD, & Stairway all got massive airplay(they even had a truncated version of Stairway that played on AM) back then. It brought Zep to the masses,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...