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Henrik
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The stormtrooper may have been rock and roll to some people, but to me it smacks of empty sensationalism - and hence, of things spiralling out of control. It didn't signify anything at all - it was just "Hey, is this outrageous or what?"

I've always struggled to find the right way to express what I feel about that outfit--this is pretty much it, thanks Otto!

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Jimmy Page put on a fantastic show on Easter Sunday 1977 and I 'm really happy to have been there. Page and Zeppelin played their asses off. No one got up and left the show because of what Page was wearing and I'm sure many here would have very different opinions about this show if they were actually in attendance.

I know a lot of musicians who started playing guitar after seeing Jimmy Page perform on this tour and it's a positive thing to inspire musicians.

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98325681kn2.jpg

Love it, simple but so effective!!!

(This was posted by 3hrsoflunacy back on the first page and I meant to reply as a quote, just so no-one things i'm taking the glory for this pic!!!) LOL

Edited by moffo
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Jimmy Page put on a fantastic show on Easter Sunday 1977 and I 'm really happy to have been there. Page and Zeppelin played their asses off. No one got up and left the show because of what Page was wearing and I'm sure many here would have very different opinions about this show if they were actually in attendance.

I know a lot of musicians who started playing guitar after seeing Jimmy Page perform on this tour and it's a positive thing to inspire musicians.

Nice to see you, Chicago! Make no mistake, I envy you a LOT! :lol: It's been so long since they quit, and even many of us who have been fans since the 1970's have never had the opportunity to see them live, and I'm one of these people. I wouldn't really dispute what you are saying, and in a way it's impossible to dispute. It's just that I think there is more to this than what you have stated here.

They were reaching huge audiences on that tour, and it must have been inspiring to a lot of people, not only because it was great shows (magnificent lights and all that), but also because they still sounded unlike anybody else. I mean, to me, listening to these bootlegs and official live releases, LZ, even on a bad night, sound like an almost impossibly great band having an off night. So I'm not doubting that.

I'm also not doubting what you and others who experienced their 1977 shows first hand are saying either - I realize there really is no substitute for having actually been at a show. Even a good quality DVD only ever gives you a faint glimpse of that - you hear what they played, see how they moved onstage, you see the lighting, and it's all kind of muffled by comparison with the first hand experience. You rely on your imagination a lot when you watch these things, I find, and that's a poor substitute.

But the thing is, it kind of works both ways... I can't dispute what you experienced at a concert, and, on the other hand, your experience isn't mine, so it can't convince me as such. I still have to go from descriptions by people like yourself who were there, and then add to that bootlegs, existing video footage, photos, etc. and then make up my own mind. My opinion on 1977 is basically that relatively speaking it was a period where real problems were coming to the surface, in various ways, and that you can hear it in the live performances. It was Led Zeppelin, and one expects a lot.

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QUOTE (Chicago @ Jul 22 2009, 09:36 AM)

Jimmy Page put on a fantastic show on Easter Sunday 1977 and I 'm really happy to have been there. Page and Zeppelin played their asses off. No one got up and left the show because of what Page was wearing and I'm sure many here would have very different opinions about this show if they were actually in attendance.

I know a lot of musicians who started playing guitar after seeing Jimmy Page perform on this tour and it's a positive thing to inspire musicians.

Nice to see you, Chicago! Make no mistake, I envy you a LOT! It's been so long since they quit, and even many of us who have been fans since the 1970's have never had the opportunity to see them live, and I'm one of these people. I wouldn't really dispute what you are saying, and in a way it's impossible to dispute. It's just that I think there is more to this than what you have stated here.

They were reaching huge audiences on that tour, and it must have been inspiring to a lot of people, not only because it was great shows (magnificent lights and all that), but also because they still sounded unlike anybody else. I mean, to me, listening to these bootlegs and official live releases, LZ, even on a bad night, sound like an almost impossibly great band having an off night. So I'm not doubting that.

I'm also not doubting what you and others who experienced their 1977 shows first hand are saying either - I realize there really is no substitute for having actually been at a show. Even a good quality DVD only ever gives you a faint glimpse of that - you hear what they played, see how they moved onstage, you see the lighting, and it's all kind of muffled by comparison with the first hand experience. You rely on your imagination a lot when you watch these things, I find, and that's a poor substitute.

But the thing is, it kind of works both ways... I can't dispute what you experienced at a concert, and, on the other hand, your experience isn't mine, so it can't convince me as such. I still have to go from descriptions by people like yourself who were there, and then add to that bootlegs, existing video footage, photos, etc. and then make up my own mind. My opinion on 1977 is basically that relatively speaking it was a period where real problems were coming to the surface, in various ways, and that you can hear it in the live performances. It was Led Zeppelin, and one expects a lot.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Otto, you make clear points about the 1977 tour and I agree it was most definitely an inconsisent tour. There were many factors that led to the quality of the music during that time. The long lay-off after Robert's wreck created a black hole of uncertainty about their own musical future. Zeppelin were in non-resident status and drug and drink problems were expanding into unhealthy territory. Filling the void that playing music used to satiate. I love Presence, but other than that it seems there was very little playing taking place during that time. If you don't run the machine it starts to corrode.

By the time rehearsals had been wrapped for the Zeppelin 1977 tour, Page was proclaiming "We have the stamina to play for 10 straight hours!" Then the postponement of the 1st leg of tour due to Robert's throat situation and I think the most detrimental contributing factor about that tour. They didn't play as a band for over a month and Jimmy said he didn't even practice his guitar. If he wasn't practicing you lose your abilities pretty quick. I couldn't understand why he wouldn't prepare for the big tour approaching. I'm sure he wasn't running laps and more likely enjoying his intakes.

As an enormous fan already at that young age I also had expectations about the band and Jimmy. I was hoping to have caught them mid-tour when they would be loose and slamming. That was initially the case until the tour was re-configured and Zeppelin played really early in Chicago. I had a bad feeling they'd probably be rusty. The band had also hit Chicago extremely early on the 1975 tour and had arrived in bad shape, with Page's busted finger and Robert's croak of a voice. I was hoping to avoid the warm-up pase of the 1977 tour, but that's not how it went. The April 7th and April 10th shows were damn fine and they gelled really well and seemed to apply themselves.

As the tour progressed there were some really potent shows ( Cleveland, Houston and the string of shows in L.A.) By the 3rd leg of the tour the band were absolute toast and were probably just trying to get through it. Page looked drained of his life force and doing those 2 outdoor shows in Oakland showed how unhealthy he was. On the 1977 Seattle video, Bonzo looked half asleep during the intermidable Over the Top. Not a flourishing time for Zeppelin and then the crushing blow of Karac Plant's death.

I've written extensively on the shows I saw on that tour in Chicago and articulated the highs and lows of the four nights. My major disappointment in those shows was the glaring omission of Dazed and Confused. I always thought that song encapsulated Page's intensity,chops and mystery. Jimmy had to be in good form to pull it off and by performing it on the Outrider tour and the 02 show, Page must have known how much power that song possessed. I know others have said the song had run it's course by 1977, but I don't know anyone that wouldn't have preferred Dazed and Confused over Page's sonic experiment solo.

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Just wanted to make the point, Chicago, that my comment was just about the outfit (which did nevertheless seem indicative of the zeitgeist), not the quality of the show. I envy you hugely too. :D

And keep meaning to say, this is a great picture. As you say, moffo, simple but so effective.

98325681kn2.jpg

Love it, simple but so effective!!!

(This was posted by 3hrsoflunacy back on the first page and I meant to reply as a quote, just so no-one things i'm taking the glory for this pic!!!) LOL

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Well, there's no need for igniting the fight again, two weeks after it was settled, is there. Even if the previous arguing were pointless, I can't see how THIS post - 9 days after you made a comment in the Cool Pictures of Jimmy thread - could possibly carry any point... :rolleyes:

...I was about to add how my post made no point, but clearly everyone can tell..so there was no need to say anything...I dont even remember saying anything there, and so what if i did? Whats wrong with that?..And its creepy that you know it was 9 days from then. :/

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Hi Otto, you make clear points about the 1977 tour and I agree it was most definitely an inconsisent tour. There were many factors that led to the quality of the music during that time. The long lay-off after Robert's wreck created a black hole of uncertainty about their own musical future. Zeppelin were in non-resident status and drug and drink problems were expanding into unhealthy territory. Filling the void that playing music used to satiate. I love Presence, but other than that it seems there was very little playing taking place during that time. If you don't run the machine it starts to corrode.

By the time rehearsals had been wrapped for the Zeppelin 1977 tour, Page was proclaiming "We have the stamina to play for 10 straight hours!" Then the postponement of the 1st leg of tour due to Robert's throat situation and I think the most detrimental contributing factor about that tour. They didn't play as a band for over a month and Jimmy said he didn't even practice his guitar. If he wasn't practicing you lose your abilities pretty quick. I couldn't understand why he wouldn't prepare for the big tour approaching. I'm sure he wasn't running laps and more likely enjoying his intakes.

As an enormous fan already at that young age I also had expectations about the band and Jimmy. I was hoping to have caught them mid-tour when they would be loose and slamming. That was initially the case until the tour was re-configured and Zeppelin played really early in Chicago. I had a bad feeling they'd probably be rusty. The band had also hit Chicago extremely early on the 1975 tour and had arrived in bad shape, with Page's busted finger and Robert's croak of a voice. I was hoping to avoid the warm-up pase of the 1977 tour, but that's not how it went. The April 7th and April 10th shows were damn fine and they gelled really well and seemed to apply themselves.

As the tour progressed there were some really potent shows ( Cleveland, Houston and the string of shows in L.A.) By the 3rd leg of the tour the band were absolute toast and were probably just trying to get through it. Page looked drained of his life force and doing those 2 outdoor shows in Oakland showed how unhealthy he was. On the 1977 Seattle video, Bonzo looked half asleep during the intermidable Over the Top. Not a flourishing time for Zeppelin and then the crushing blow of Karac Plant's death.

I've written extensively on the shows I saw on that tour in Chicago and articulated the highs and lows of the four nights. My major disappointment in those shows was the glaring omission of Dazed and Confused. I always thought that song encapsulated Page's intensity,chops and mystery. Jimmy had to be in good form to pull it off and by performing it on the Outrider tour and the 02 show, Page must have known how much power that song possessed. I know others have said the song had run it's course by 1977, but I don't know anyone that wouldn't have preferred Dazed and Confused over Page's sonic experiment solo.

That's interesting. What you say about the effects of Robert's illness seems very convincing to me. I never could understand why Jimmy didn't touch the guitar for weeks under the circumstances, it just seemed really odd. But I guess in a different way it makes sense. And otherwise, your response just goes to show that if we disagree at all on the tour as such, it's more a matter of degree and emphasis than of really opposed points of view. Of course it wasn't all just awful. I agree with you about Dazed and the sonic experiment thing - and with what you say about the Seattle show. If you compare that show with the 1973 gig in Hamburg - where Jimmy and Bonzo are both on top form - you get a really stark contrast. Thanks!

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That's interesting. What you say about the effects of Robert's illness seems very convincing to me. I never could understand why Jimmy didn't touch the guitar for weeks under the circumstances, it just seemed really odd. But I guess in a different way it makes sense. And otherwise, your response just goes to show that if we disagree at all on the tour as such, it's more a matter of degree and emphasis than of really opposed points of view. Of course it wasn't all just awful. I agree with you about Dazed and the sonic experiment thing - and with what you say about the Seattle show. If you compare that show with the 1973 gig in Hamburg - where Jimmy and Bonzo are both on top form - you get a really stark contrast. Thanks!

Chicago makes some very interesting points about this tour Otto. I won't rehash my previous opinions from another thread but he is spot on re expectations and the final standard being well below par. I have had the benefit of hindsight for 32 yrs but, my initial conclusion of unhappiness in the camp during that tour still stands. You could actually feel the bands boredom and I can tell you from personal experience, like all Zeppelin concerts, the previously initiated in the crowd, felt it

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