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leddy

England

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About $1.50 to £1, last time I checked. So a dollar is about 66p. So ten bucks is £6.66. The number of the beast.

So if I walk into an English pun and order a Boddington's ale on tap, a large, about what would it cost?

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When I was in England in July, a pint was around £3 or something. I was out in the countryside, in London it's probably more. A bottle of Cornish Rattler hard cider was £3.90 and worth every pence! I wish they sold it in America. That, and Tregroes waffles, sticky toffee pudding and homity pie. :)

And now for something completely different. Another amazing story of a bloke or blokette with a metal detector finding a stunning ancient artefact: A metal detector enthusiast in Cumbria has discovered a rare Roman bronze helmet complete with face-mask http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cumbria-11287093

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When I was in England in July, a pint was around £3 or something. I was out in the countryside, in London it's probably more. A bottle of Cornish Rattler hard cider was £3.90 and worth every pence! I wish they sold it in America. That, and Tregroes waffles, sticky toffee pudding and homity pie. :)

And now for something completely different. Another amazing story of a bloke or blokette with a metal detector finding a stunning ancient artefact: A metal detector enthusiast in Cumbria has discovered a rare Roman bronze helmet complete with face-mask http://www.bbc.co.uk...umbria-11287093

Very interesting stuff, the Roman helmet in such good shape.

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So, Simply Red? Should be in another thread, but... would like a UK perspective.

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Bishop Rock

bishop_rock302.jpg

Bishop Rock is one of South West England's most dramatic and most remote locations imaginable.

It is a testament to the power of nature and a defining symbol of Britain as an island nation.

Standing on a rock ledge four miles west of the Scillies, Bishop Rock Lighthouse faces the full force of the Atlantic's waves daily.

Bishop Rock was one of the most hazardous and difficult sites for the building of a lighthouse when work first begun on its construction.

The lighthouse has protected sea-farers since 1858 when it is built on a sheer rock rising 45 metres from the sea bed.

There are about 5,700 tonnes of granite without any steelwork, glass engines and helipad at the moment.

They're all dove-tailed with lead filling, and bolted into the actual granite rock which is underneath.

Bishop Rock's light shines out for 24 nautical miles.

In the old days the lighthouse had to rely on paraffin vapour lamps and, before that, candles.

Today there are generators, batteries and a helipad which was built in 1976 - this means visitors can actually land on top of the lighthouse instead of coming in by boat.

Bishop Rock was converted to automatic operation in 1991 and the last keepers left the lighthouse in December 1992.

Today the lighthouse has ten floors, and up to four visitors can stay here for a week to three weeks

The control room is on the third floor - the lighthouse keepers can work on the station, manually, or remotely from their headquarters in Harwich, Essex.

Bishop Rock is a wonder indeed, especially in glorious weather, but to withstand autumn gales and winter storms for months on end, perhaps that's where the true wonder of this place lies.

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^

The band Simply Red? Very popular in the U.K still.

Mick Hucknell has one hell of a voice. Sorry, not a UK perspective :unsure:

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^

The band Simply Red? Very popular in the U.K still.

Thanks for your reply, Mangani.

I read that Simply Red will wind down their farewell tour on Dec. 18 and 19 with sold out dates at the O2. I saw them in the 80's promoting 'Picture Book'. ally is right that Hucknall has a set of pipes on him. A whale of a show when I saw him and his excellent band.

Glad to hear he's still popular... hadn't heard much about him the last few years.

Been watching some great clips on YouTube recently.

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^

I've never been a fan but my sis and bro in law are. They saw them at Wembley Stadium some time ago.

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Please help to settle a disagreement: the term of address "guv" or "guv'nor". This person I know says it is only used for a higher-ranking law enforcement person (influenced by her watching of "Life On Mars" and "The Bill"), whereas I believe it's also used more casually toward any man who gets respect, any kind of boss. Jimmy Page once said that Bonzo was the governor in the group, because his drums were the driving force of the music. Ta.

P.S. While we're wondering where Leddy has gone, I also wonder about Little Miss Honeydripper (if all the Jason posts haven't drawn her out, nothing will)

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FireOpal,

Not many people except old time cockneys use the term "guv" or "guv'nor" these days but it can be used for meaning either "the boss" or as a casual term for anyone. You don't even have to know a person to refer to him as "guv".

I have never heard that the term is reserved solely for higher ranking law enforcement personnel. That's not true.

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I have never heard that the term is reserved solely for higher ranking law enforcement personnel. That's not true.

Thanks, Mangani! I love it when I'm right :)

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You should have had a bet, hun. :slapface:

By the way, there are other similar terms that you don't really hear too often these days either.

One is "Squire" and the other one is "gaffer". Gaffer means "boss", much in the same way that "guv'nor" can mean boss.

Edited by Mangani

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I've not heard gaffer before, interesting. Squire I seem to recall from a Monty Python sketch, I can hear Eric Idle saying it in my mind. :)

Speaking of outdated slang, when I was buying an old coin at an antique shop in Avebury, I handed the shopkeeper the exact change to which he replied, "ticketyboo." People don't really say that anymore I don't imagine. He was probably doing "stage English" to amuse the tourist. I didn't know how to respond.

Ecky thump guv'nor, "ticketyboo"?!

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You should have had a bet, hun. :slapface:

By the way, there are other similar terms that you don't really hear too often these days either.

One is "Squire" and the other one is "gaffer". Gaffer means "boss", much in the same way that "guv'nor" can mean boss.

I've heard that football managers are often called gaffers when referred to casually. Any truth to that?

Edited by Henrik

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I've not heard gaffer before, interesting. Squire I seem to recall from a Monty Python sketch, I can hear Eric Idle saying it in my mind. :)

Ha yeah I can recal Eric Idle saying that too.

Speaking of outdated slang, when I was buying an old coin at an antique shop in Avebury, I handed the shopkeeper the exact change to which he replied, "ticketyboo." People don't really say that anymore I don't imagine. He was probably doing "stage English" to amuse the tourist. I didn't know how to respond.

Ecky thump guv'nor, "ticketyboo"?!

LOL, actually I have used that word (ticketyboo) when 'trying' to be funny. Someone might say to me "how are things with you?" and I'll reply "oh everything is just ticketyboo thanks". Just a silly word to use when being friendly. But yeah very "stage English". :)

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I've heard that football managers are often called gaffers when referred to casually. Any truth to that?

Yes, as Ady has already mentioned. They still are.

By the way Ady that clip brings back memories. Late '70s or early '80s wasn't it? I can't really remember much about the show itself, just the theme song.

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Yes, as Ady has already mentioned. They still are.

By the way Ady that clip brings back memories. Late '70s or early '80s wasn't it? I can't really remember much about the show itself, just the theme song.

The opening titles and theme song are all I remember really. I just looked it up and ran from '81 - '83.

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Ah thanks. 1981 to 1983 then. I thought it was a bit older than that.

Do you rememeber Selwyn Froggitt as well?

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Ah thanks. 1981 to 1983 then. I thought it was a bit older than that.

Do you rememeber Selwyn Froggitt as well?

I know of the character, but I've never seen the TV series.

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Yep, it still gets used in that sense.

I'm reminded of this from when I was a kid.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfHGAeG-kh8

Thats a blast from the past...Old bill :)

Well done England cricket team for making us proud down under, its been along time but playing really well..next year is more important though when India come over to England for tour as they are ranked number one in the world, but we will enjoy beating Australia even if they are down the rankngs.

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Oh, praise the Lord! I have a couple questions I've been dying to ask, but there's no easy way to bring it up. It's actually a pretty serious topic, and I'd love any kinda feedback. For real. This is work-related and grave.

What is mental health treatment like in the UK? (Hopefully you guys are crazy enough to know.) I've heard from a few different British people who suffer from mental illnesses that it's difficult to get what you need. Like, they don't take you very seriously, they're less likely to diagnose you with something that requires expensive treatment, and they're less likely to refer you to counseling. (All this is coming from people who are irritated with the system, though.)

How does the government handle child abuse? Like, in the US, each state has Child Protective Services (sometimes called other things like Department of Children and Families or something.) If a kid's being abused, someone calls up that office and makes a report and then an investigation is opened. Unfortunately, some states are better than others at handling reports. :( For instance, Texas.... well... if you wanna beat your kids, go to Texas. That's kinda how I see it sometimes. So is it like that in the UK? ('Cept hopefully better than Texas?)

How common is it for kids to get treated bad by their parents? I know that's a broooaaaaad question, so think of it sorta like... If a friend of yours at school said he got hit by his dad and had to sleep at a friend's house last night, would you be like a) wow, rough home life, or b ) holy crap! Someone needs to call CPS and get this kid some help!?

Does everybody freakin' drink over there, too? What's rehab like? Easy to get into? Affordable? Is it common for kids to get wasted even when they're still in junior high? Like when they're 13 or 14? (That totally happens in the States, too, but usually the kids are in high school when they start getting drunk.)

Here's why I'm asking all this, and I'm going to try to stay vague: I work with kids and teenagers who are in crisis, some of our services are web-based, and we'll get kids from different countries contacting us over the Internet sometimes. Mostly they're from England, sometimes from Ireland or Australia. The nature of their crises is often pretty grave, but I think we tend to get those kindsa kids because they know we're in the US and it's harder for us to find them and help them. It's easier for them to stay anonymous.

Well, we want to help them, but it's hard when you don't understand the social services over there. :( They're sorta outta focus, cuz our organization is totally States-based, but we help them anyway of course.

(And obviously my workplace has no idea I'm writing this on a message board, so here's hoping they don't find out! But I trust you guys for some good ideas.)

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Leddy started this thread. Has anyone heard from him at all? I haven't in ages.

Hi am back for a little while, then will clear off again for a year, I get a little tired of the bickering and fights on here after a while, plus there are hardly anyone on here at any given time now,so replies and banter is a bit slow noe lol. Where are the days when this forum had hundreds on at a time ??. But back on here for the love of Zepplein.

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