Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Sign in to follow this  
Shenouda5252@gmail.com

Opening scene of The Song Remains the Same

Recommended Posts

Does anybody know what the meaning of the opening scene of The Song Remains the Same is? When Peter Grant is dressed like a 1920s gangster with a tommy gun and gets in the old model A and then shoots up the werewolves' poker game. Does anybody know the meaning behind that scene? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Shenouda5252@gmail.com said:

Does anybody know what the meaning of the opening scene of The Song Remains the Same is? When Peter Grant is dressed like a 1920s gangster with a tommy gun and gets in the old model A and then shoots up the werewolves' poker game. Does anybody know the meaning behind that scene? 

I think it was Peter Grant's way of taking "aim" at all the critics and all the others who doubted the early Led Zeppelin.  Those that described Led Zeppelin has pure "hype". 

Then again, I could be wrong. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, kingzoso said:

I think it was Peter Grant's way of taking "aim" at all the critics and all the others who doubted the early Led Zeppelin.  Those that described Led Zeppelin has pure "hype". 

Then again, I could be wrong. 

Hmm that sounds like it could be it. Thanks a lot for the response man!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Shenouda5252@gmail.com said:

Does anybody know what the meaning of the opening scene of The Song Remains the Same is? When Peter Grant is dressed like a 1920s gangster with a tommy gun and gets in the old model A and then shoots up the werewolves' poker game. Does anybody know the meaning behind that scene? 

Probably a not-so-subtle allusion to Zeppelin's gangster-like reputation for conducting business?  No-nonsense vs. heavy-handed being in the eye of the beholder, I suppose.  Not like the musical establishment they pushed back against were exactly choir boys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side."

~ Hunter S. Thompson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I may read too much into things but my take is this  

The faceless man and the fat cat playing a game represented the music establishment. The wolf man represented the radio voices (Wolfman Jack) and the pin suit gangster was just that, a gangster. 

All properly dispatched by our guys, the new bosses in town. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe it was symbolic of all that they hated about the leacherous music industry, and what they (Grant et al) would do if ever crossed. It seems to share a connection to the scene in the movie where Grant is ripping the MSG manager a new A-hole for allowing bootleg shirts to be sold. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The opening scene was simply Grant's fantasy sequence.  All 5 of them were asked to come up with a fantasy segment and Grant's was that of a gangster, which fitted his personality and style.  I guess the when the scenes were being discussed and he was asked who are you going to shoot up, the faceless music media were the obvious choice.  Bonzo was the only one who didn't have a fantasy theme like the others.  He chose to be just himself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very much agree the main point " Don't even THINK about messing with us ". I love Zep in every way , but apart from

Bonzo's sequence in the movie, the others really are rather unfocused and just are not the dynamic representations 

of Grant and the boys you would expect. The opening sequence even for me seeing it in a midnight movie situation,

Yes, the muscle behind Zep , yes, but the sequence , violence and all, still IMO boring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Mithril46 said:

Very much agree the main point " Don't even THINK about messing with us ". I love Zep in every way , but apart from

Bonzo's sequence in the movie, the others really are rather unfocused and just are not the dynamic representations 

of Grant and the boys you would expect. The opening sequence even for me seeing it in a midnight movie situation,

Yes, the muscle behind Zep , yes, but the sequence , violence and all, still IMO boring.

May I ask Mithril why is it that your posts always appear disjointed with paragraphs finishing mid sentence and then continuing at the start of the next paragraph ? Yet when I quote you and your words appear in the quote box they're reshaped into how I'm guessing you originally intended them to be!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎8‎/‎14‎/‎2016 at 0:48 AM, Shenouda5252@gmail.com said:

Does anybody know what the meaning of the opening scene of The Song Remains the Same is? When Peter Grant is dressed like a 1920s gangster with a tommy gun and gets in the old model A and then shoots up the werewolves' poker game. Does anybody know the meaning behind that scene? 

As with most great art, it's open to interpretation. Obviously, it's Peter Grant's fantasy segment. He's portrayed as a gangster. I tend to agree with interpretations that suggest on one level it is meant to show him delivering a bit of ultra-violence to those who had control of the music industry. I haven't heard of the Faceless Man and the Wolfman representing specific sectors of the industry (radio and the press), but it's plausible. On another level, I think there is something to be said for the Nazi symbol being depicted on the cards, as there has been speculation that Peter was of Jewish ancestry. Note the peculiar absence of blood. Then again, that could simply have been a concession for audiences. 

Careful analysis of the scene confirmed it was filmed in the room over the auto garage at Tower House (Jimmy's home in Kensington). The exterior shots were filmed at Horselunges Manor (Peter's home in Hellingly) and Hammerwood in East Grinstead.

When I visited current owner of Hammerwood (David Pinnegar) in 1998 he was convinced the final scene of Peter & Richard standing in the doorway was also filmed at Hammerwood. He showed me two doorways that seemed to match that of the one in the film, but he had no way of knowing which of the two they used.

     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I very much doubt Tower House was used as an inside location shot.  Way too intrusive for Pagey, what with all the equipment and people.  I think it's pretty evident that they used Hammerwood for the whole shoot-em-up scenes.  From what I've read, there would have been no concern about any damage being inflicted on the property as it was already in a rough state.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't comment much on location, I just am not up on that. As far as my strange paragraph/spacing issue, if I knew how

to fix that I would. My brother has called me one of the least computer savvy people he has ever encountered Sorry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...