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MortSahlFan

Quotes of Great Bands/Artists Who Liked/Disliked Led Zeppelin?

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9 hours ago, babysquid said:

I wonder wether you'll feel the same if somebody does steal one of your disposable riffs and makes a ton of money from it that you never see.

Oh, I'd sue the shit out of them for every penny I could get, no doubt. But, I'd still be damn happy about it...all day long. Its really a win win situation. At the very least, you've been plucked from obscurity and your music reaches a much wider audience (where there once was none). At best, you might get some coin out of it. You haven't lost anything, so where's the downside?

 

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The money, sure, no argument, . Not so clear about much wider recognition for Holmes and let's say various blues

cats. Quite a few of the US blues players had already been recognized in the mid 60's by pre-Zep bands,(English), and

many were already very successfully touring Europe and not much later playing festivals with all kinds of funny lineups.

Page even mentioned this, US festivals with a blues band, a jazz group, a bluegrass project, etc. Ah, those were the days....

 

A sidenote to the suing, wonder how much Memphis Minnie's estate got from Zep's proper crediting on WTLB ??

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On 08/10/2016 at 5:53 AM, Boleskinner said:

I think this is spot on and in the early years a lot of critics viewed Zep as an uncouth, dumbed-down Cream. 

Critics, especially in Britain, always prefer bands who are seen as "clever" in some way. Contrast the way the Arctic Monkeys were treated in the music press when they started to the way, say, Kasabian are treated. (I don't have a dog in the fight: liked the first two Arctics albums, thought they went right off after that.). The Arctics were drooled over due to witty lyrics, even though musically it was nothing more or less than meat and potatoes rock. Kasabian were and always have been slagged off in the NME etc, as thick and dumbed down.

 

Critics gravitate to clever / arty bands, and in 1969 Zeppelin were emphatically not arty, they were a much needed antidote to the proggy "triple concept album" type of band.

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I do agree to that quite a bit. Zep i, I think in particular Robert's rather overwhelming and  sexual vocal antics, were

too primal for most critics. As was a general sledgehammer approach, bold and meant to rattle cages. On the other

hand even that first album had plenty of subtleties. But so true, with many critics , lyrics are of paramount importance,

even if the music sucked. Jon Anderson of Yes had a great voice , wrote rather preposterous lyrics, but still sounded

great. In certain ways his nonsense lyrics actually enhanced Yes' cosmic approach. Yes was regarded as quite clever,

but actually that didn't stop many critics from trashing them. I remember reading some great reviews of some punk/new

wave bands, buying the albums, and being amazed how critics liked them. The reviews were actually far better than the

music.

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10 hours ago, 76229 said:

Critics, especially in Britain, always prefer bands who are seen as "clever" in some way. Contrast the way the Arctic Monkeys were treated in the music press when they started to the way, say, Kasabian are treated. (I don't have a dog in the fight: liked the first two Arctics albums, thought they went right off after that.). The Arctics were drooled over due to witty lyrics, even though musically it was nothing more or less than meat and potatoes rock. Kasabian were and always have been slagged off in the NME etc, as thick and dumbed down.

 

Critics gravitate to clever / arty bands, and in 1969 Zeppelin were emphatically not arty, they were a much needed antidote to the proggy "triple concept album" type of band.

How many proggy "triple concept albums" had been released by 1969??

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14 hours ago, 76229 said:

Critics, especially in Britain, always prefer bands who are seen as "clever" in some way. Contrast the way the Arctic Monkeys were treated in the music press when they started to the way, say, Kasabian are treated. (I don't have a dog in the fight: liked the first two Arctics albums, thought they went right off after that.). The Arctics were drooled over due to witty lyrics, even though musically it was nothing more or less than meat and potatoes rock. Kasabian were and always have been slagged off in the NME etc, as thick and dumbed down.

 

Critics gravitate to clever / arty bands, and in 1969 Zeppelin were emphatically not arty, they were a much needed antidote to the proggy "triple concept album" type of band.

Music journalism in Britain changed forever in '76/77, you can't compare what was going on in the late 60s to what is going on now.

The reasons why Led Zeppelin were slated were multiple, they were perceived to have gone off to America to make their fortune, their music was thought to be a cash in on Cream's success, they were making big money almost straight away, Robert Plant's singing was pretty mad sounding, all the blues lyrics & riffs they 'stole' & I guess some critics maybe just didn't like them very much.

I would also point out that what is widely considered to be the first 'prog' album (In the court of the crimson king by King Crimson) was released 9 months after Led Zeppelin's debut.

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On 10/8/2016 at 1:30 AM, babysquid said:

I don't remember a single song about hobbits! Gollum, ringwraiths, the misty mountains and mordor all get a mention sure but I don't recall listening to Whole Lotta Baggins or Stairway to Pippin.

Don't be obtuse, you and everyone else knew exactly what I was talking about.

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7 hours ago, Balthazor said:

Don't be obtuse, you and everyone else knew exactly what I was talking about.

Yeah, but that was still pretty funny...Whole Lotta Baggins. I would buy that.

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44 minutes ago, IpMan said:

Yeah, but that was still pretty funny...Whole Lotta Baggins. I would buy that.

Absolutely. Or how about Houses of the Hobbits, or Baggin's Last Stand. Trampled Underfoot, don't even have to change that one. Anything would be better than that dreadful Leonard Nimoy song.

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14 hours ago, Balthazor said:

Don't be obtuse, you and everyone else knew exactly what I was talking about.

I know I was just messing!

7 hours ago, Balthazor said:

Absolutely. Or how about Houses of the Hobbits, or Baggin's Last Stand. Trampled Underfoot, don't even have to change that one. Anything would be better than that dreadful Leonard Nimoy song.

Trampled Underfoot!!! Of course! How could I have missed that one, very clever!

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8 hours ago, babysquid said:

I know I was just messing!

Sorry, it's hard to judge tone from a forum post. Given that it's the internet, I tend to assume people are being jerks. :)

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4 hours ago, Balthazor said:

Although, now that I think of it, Gollum was technically a Hobbit, so... 

Yes he was, a seriously fucked up Hobbit but one none the less. 

No offense but in my version of LOTR Frodo & Samwise cockring Gollum with the Ring and then throw his nasty ass into the volcano...Preciousssssss

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9 hours ago, Balthazor said:

Although, now that I think of it, Gollum was technically a Hobbit, so... 

Of course! Now I feel stupid!!

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Well here's one you wouldn't expect. The guitar player Peter ?? From REM really dug Jimmy's guitar tones on Presence.

He said he at times strived to get the rather(according to him) metallic tones on the album. Not heavy metal, but the actual metallic sound of the strings coming thru the recording. IMO ALS and FYL have plenty of what I think he's

talking about. He didn't name songs, but I'm not sure Page used that sound, or EQ curve, or whatever elsewhere.

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I always liked the supposed quote from Keith Moon that "they would go down like a lead balloon" on the naming of the band.

The first Rush album (Working Man)was mistaken as the new Zep as was mentioned above.Mick Box of Uriah Heep who Rush were supporting in the early years said look out Zep.Unfortunately Geddy Lee didn't look like Plant

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Paul Gilbert is a huge Led Zep and Jimmy Page fan. He even played together with JPJ

Here is an interview quote:

So during those formative years which guitar players influenced you the most?

"Firstly and foremost Jimmy Page: I was a huge Led Zeppelin fan."

Source: http://www.alloutguitar.com/interviews/paul-gilbert-interview-the-shredmeister-general

Edited by the-ocean87

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Saw that video awhile ago, JPJ seemed quite pleased with the result, it sounded great.  After hearing that I was happy to see the remasters include Going to California backtrack instrumental.  Sometimes the simple stripped down tracks allow one to reexperience the music.  I felt the same when hearing The Song Remains the Same as an instrumental.  Reminds you of just how great the band was, and it was intended to be an instrumental if Im not mistaken,

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On ‎31‎/‎10‎/‎2016 at 9:14 AM, grasbo said:

I always liked the supposed quote from Keith Moon that "they would go down like a lead balloon" on the naming of the band.

The first Rush album (Working Man)was mistaken as the new Zep as was mentioned above.Mick Box of Uriah Heep who Rush were supporting in the early years said look out Zep.Unfortunately Geddy Lee didn't look like Plant

I think the Keith Moon thing was related to the band he played with on Beck's Bolero, Beck, Page, Moon, John Paul Jones & Nicky Hopkins.

There was a plan to start a band there & then (1967) but Moon was unable to leave The Who & it fell apart only for Jimmy Page to use the name again a year or so down the line. I also believe John Entwistle was involved in the joke.

Happy to be corrected though.

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4 hours ago, Mook said:

I think the Keith Moon thing was related to the band he played with on Beck's Bolero, Beck, Page, Moon, John Paul Jones & Nicky Hopkins.

There was a plan to start a band there & then (1967) but Moon was unable to leave The Who & it fell apart only for Jimmy Page to use the name again a year or so down the line. I also believe John Entwistle was involved in the joke.

Happy to be corrected though.

That's pretty much what i heard. Only Entwistle also claimed Richard Cole heard him say it when he was driving a limo for The Who

Edited by the chase

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Not sure if this was mentioned or not, but, here is a quote from Clapton.  I have always felt he and Page didn't get along very well.  I recall Page once stating about Clapton in reference to his fascination with blues, that he was always trying to figure it out and it prevented him from expanding.  Clapton about Led Zeppelin:
 

Led Zeppelin took up our legacy. But then they took it somewhere else that I didn’t really have a great deal of admiration for.  From Uncut Mag, 2013.

I recall sometime in the 1980's, he, Beck and Page onstage for a instrumental of Stairways.  Other than that and the very early years of the Yardbirds, have they had any friendly interactions or communication in public?

 

 
 

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18 hours ago, Canadianzepper said:

Not sure if this was mentioned or not, but, here is a quote from Clapton.  I have always felt he and Page didn't get along very well.  I recall Page once stating about Clapton in reference to his fascination with blues, that he was always trying to figure it out and it prevented him from expanding.  Clapton about Led Zeppelin:
 

Led Zeppelin took up our legacy. But then they took it somewhere else that I didn’t really have a great deal of admiration for.  From Uncut Mag, 2013.

I recall sometime in the 1980's, he, Beck and Page onstage for a instrumental of Stairways.  Other than that and the very early years of the Yardbirds, have they had any friendly interactions or communication in public?

 

 
 

This from 'Jimmy Page: Magus, Musician, Man' by George Case:

Around the same time Page was producing him in the studio, Clapton visited his house in Epson to have some private jams, which Page also recorded. "The Bluesbreakers were playing over in Putney and Eric came to stay at my house. I had a Simon tape recorder that you could DI into [directly inject electric instruments without first playing through an amp], so the two guitars went into the machine and I just did these tapes of Eric and myself playing." The DI trick enabled a huge amount of distortion while the two musicians played around with different twelve-bar I-IV-V progressions. But Page let Andrew Oldham's Immediate label know about the tapes ("I was really championing Eric, as you would"), and they were confiscated as part of both Page's and Clapton's contractual obligations. "I argued that they couldn't put them out, because they were just variations of blues structures, and in the end we dubbed some other instruments over some of them and they came out, with liner notes attributed to me... though I didn't have anything to do with writing them. I didn't get a penny out of it, anyway." This rather exploitative move on the label's part-they were released when given rhythm tracks by Rolling Stones Charlie Watts, Bill Wyman and Mick Jagger playing harmonica-led to some mistrust of Clapton toward Page, and Page's own frustrations at not owning music he had made. It was a bitter lesson. 

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"They were very loud-I thought it was unnecessarily loud. I really did like some of it, but a lot of it was just too much. They overemphasized whatever point they were making, I thought." -Eric Clapton

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On 11/5/2016 at 8:59 PM, Canadianzepper said:

Not sure if this was mentioned or not, but, here is a quote from Clapton.  I have always felt he and Page didn't get along very well.  I recall Page once stating about Clapton in reference to his fascination with blues, that he was always trying to figure it out and it prevented him from expanding.  Clapton about Led Zeppelin:
 

Led Zeppelin took up our legacy. But then they took it somewhere else that I didn’t really have a great deal of admiration for.  From Uncut Mag, 2013.

I recall sometime in the 1980's, he, Beck and Page onstage for a instrumental of Stairways.  Other than that and the very early years of the Yardbirds, have they had any friendly interactions or communication in public?

 

 
 

There was a lot of jealousy from Clapton, The Who and others, I mean I get it, Zeppelin just kicked the door wide open when it came to tickets sales, world tours, album sales - but it does get frustrating from a fan point of view listening to all of these guys who really seem to go out of their way to shit on Zeppelin whenever a reporter is around. I wonder if these critics would change their mind if Page picked up the phone and offered to record with some of them?

2 camps of critics exists:

(1) The perfect technical guitar losers who insist that anything which has feel, vibe and perhaps some alternative tunings is somehow masking sloppy guitar playing i.e basically every 1980's guitar player that signed a record deal after 1983

(2) WIth the exception of The Guess Who and The Beatles - EVERY rock band from the 1960's - and it is this group that really fucking annoys me because I like  almost everything from 1963 to 1970 and yet when I read Clapton or Townsend or whoever shitting on Zeppelin  it causes me to want to listen to them less.

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On 07/11/2016 at 2:56 AM, Charles J. White said:

- EVERY rock band from the 1960's - and it is this group that really fucking annoys me because I like  almost everything from 1963 to 1970 and yet when I read Clapton or Townsend or whoever shitting on Zeppelin  it causes me to want to listen to them less.

By the late 60's most of these bands had discovered "The Band" and from that point on they aspired to be earnest and authentic developing superiority complexes and looking down on any band that hadn't followed their lead and was still having fun instead of churning out bland and boring beard stroking lps for the rest of their careers.

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