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RE-IMAGINED / RE-SEQUENCED: Houses of the Holy


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RE-IMAGINED / RE-SEQUENCED:  Houses of the Holy

SIDE ONE:
The Song Remains the Same
The Rover
Over the Hills and Far Away
Dancing Days
The Crunge (companion disc version)
Boogie with Stu

SIDE TWO:
Houses of the Holy
The Rain Song (companion disc version)
No Quarter
The Ocean
Bron-Yr-Aur

NON-ALBUM (45 rpm) SINGLE: D'yer Mak'er / Black Country Woman

Edited by dpat
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I don't think this is an improvement, to be frank. I think The Rain Song belongs after TSRTS and that's how Jimmy first had them paired when TSRTS was still an instrumental.  Boogie with Stu is not good after the Crunge and has a totally different vibe than the rest of the album. Bron-Yr-Aur isn't a bad choice in terms of mood, but I find it unnecessary and does not improve the album. Sometimes less is more.

The thing about the HOTH album is that it's the first Zeppelin album to not feature blues based riff tunes and reworked blues numbers from the past (Okay, I guess The Ocean's main riff is kinda blues based pentatonic). There's nothing on the first four albums that sounds similar to TSRTS. We can't say that about the other four albums. For example, we could say that Heartbreaker, Black Dog and Good Times Bad Times are all kind of in the same "family", as it were. Same with the 12 bar type tunes like Rock n Roll, You Shook Me, Bring it On Home and so on. We could lump rockers like Misty Mountain Hop with Out On The Tiles and very bluesy tunes like Dazed and Since I've Been Loving your and I Can't Quit You together.  But TSRTS has no precedent. It's a progressive piece of guitar driven music that was very cutting edge for the time. It has somewhat of an upbeat feel to it, sort of a happy tune, and a feel all its own.

Much the same can be said of the Rain Song. There is nothing else similar to it on the first four albums. The chord progression is harmonically rich and sophisticated. It's much more than just another "strummer." The Crunge is unlike anything else they did and so is D'yer Maker (love it or hate it!). Dancing Days has that familiar Zeppeliny feel to it and it might have sat well on the fourth album, but to me, it's much to bright and cheery for the fourth album. The fourth album has a sort of autumn or even wintery feel to it in my mind. Houses of the Holy has a nice late spring early summer feel to it. I think Dancing Days is unlike most of the earlier Zeppelin material simply because of the fact that it is so summery and happy.

Therefore, I don't think putting songs like 12 bar strummers "Boogie with Stu" would be a good mix for the feel of the album.

"Houses of the Holy" seems like a good fit though, although I don't think it would improve the album. Some might argue that HOTH (the song) is better than D'yer Maker, and I think most Zeppelin fans would agree, but the world knows D'yer Maker (not just the Zeppelin fans) but they don't know HOTH. D'yer Maker is Zeppelin showing the world that they don't take themselves too seriously and that they can have a bit of fun. I think this adds another layer of light to the album and makes it a good choice despite fan criticism.

I happen to think No Quarter adds just the right amount of darkness to provide that light and shade contrast that Zeppelin found so important. It serves its purpose. It too, by the way, is unprecedented in Zeppelin's music, even the guitar solo is unlike any previous Page solo.

Over the Hills is similar to Bring it on Home and What is and What should Never be in the exaggerated use of dynamics. It's very quiet to start and very loud all of a sudden. I could see OTHAFA sitting comfortably on the fourth album or even the third so it's not as uniquely progressive (for zeppelin) as the other songs on this album, but it's a good fit none the less. It reminded the listener that yes,  there is still quintessential Zep to be found on this album, the kind of Zep that we have all come to know and love through the first four albums. The Ocean is another along these lines. It's a bluesy riff based, blues rock solo type tune. It could have fit well on the third or even the second album - but again, it's got that very bright, happy, uplifting, summer kind of vibe that makes it a good fit for Houses.

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On 8/6/2020 at 11:36 PM, Christopher Lees said:

I don't think this is an improvement, to be frank. I think The Rain Song belongs after TSRTS and that's how Jimmy first had them paired when TSRTS was still an instrumental.  Boogie with Stu is not good after the Crunge and has a totally different vibe than the rest of the album. Bron-Yr-Aur isn't a bad choice in terms of mood, but I find it unnecessary and does not improve the album. Sometimes less is more.

The thing about the HOTH album is that it's the first Zeppelin album to not feature blues based riff tunes and reworked blues numbers from the past (Okay, I guess The Ocean's main riff is kinda blues based pentatonic). There's nothing on the first four albums that sounds similar to TSRTS. We can't say that about the other four albums. For example, we could say that Heartbreaker, Black Dog and Good Times Bad Times are all kind of in the same "family", as it were. Same with the 12 bar type tunes like Rock n Roll, You Shook Me, Bring it On Home and so on. We could lump rockers like Misty Mountain Hop with Out On The Tiles and very bluesy tunes like Dazed and Since I've Been Loving your and I Can't Quit You together.  But TSRTS has no precedent. It's a progressive piece of guitar driven music that was very cutting edge for the time. It has somewhat of an upbeat feel to it, sort of a happy tune, and a feel all its own.

Much the same can be said of the Rain Song. There is nothing else similar to it on the first four albums. The chord progression is harmonically rich and sophisticated. It's much more than just another "strummer." The Crunge is unlike anything else they did and so is D'yer Maker (love it or hate it!). Dancing Days has that familiar Zeppeliny feel to it and it might have sat well on the fourth album, but to me, it's much to bright and cheery for the fourth album. The fourth album has a sort of autumn or even wintery feel to it in my mind. Houses of the Holy has a nice late spring early summer feel to it. I think Dancing Days is unlike most of the earlier Zeppelin material simply because of the fact that it is so summery and happy.

Therefore, I don't think putting songs like 12 bar strummers "Boogie with Stu" would be a good mix for the feel of the album.

"Houses of the Holy" seems like a good fit though, although I don't think it would improve the album. Some might argue that HOTH (the song) is better than D'yer Maker, and I think most Zeppelin fans would agree, but the world knows D'yer Maker (not just the Zeppelin fans) but they don't know HOTH. D'yer Maker is Zeppelin showing the world that they don't take themselves too seriously and that they can have a bit of fun. I think this adds another layer of light to the album and makes it a good choice despite fan criticism.

I happen to think No Quarter adds just the right amount of darkness to provide that light and shade contrast that Zeppelin found so important. It serves its purpose. It too, by the way, is unprecedented in Zeppelin's music, even the guitar solo is unlike any previous Page solo.

Over the Hills is similar to Bring it on Home and What is and What should Never be in the exaggerated use of dynamics. It's very quiet to start and very loud all of a sudden. I could see OTHAFA sitting comfortably on the fourth album or even the third so it's not as uniquely progressive (for zeppelin) as the other songs on this album, but it's a good fit none the less. It reminded the listener that yes,  there is still quintessential Zep to be found on this album, the kind of Zep that we have all come to know and love through the first four albums. The Ocean is another along these lines. It's a bluesy riff based, blues rock solo type tune. It could have fit well on the third or even the second album - but again, it's got that very bright, happy, uplifting, summer kind of vibe that makes it a good fit for Houses.

Another great post and your "feel" with the Fourth album being more autumn / winter vs. HOTH summertime vibe. HOTH is just a really bright, sunny album with TSRTS, RS, & NQ having a progressive vibe. TSRTS has so many different guitar styles meshed together so seamlessly, it is a compositional miracle it even works much less smokes. 

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