Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble

Recommended Posts

118627776_3098100640416356_4329776859097228168_n.jpg.68e1c7655e4abd358dbdc3269084593d.jpg118798124_3098100517083035_1033456149432863210_n.jpg.3a3c5c48574f4334929a71651091111a.jpg2023419125_118703694_3098100743749679_705115694355598466_o(1).jpg.69df3c966984cbb4d3db83db50899471.jpg

Flashback Friday. 50 Years Gone. September 4, 1970. Los Angeles, California.These are a few of the albums that were spawned on this night in Los Angeles 50 years ago. All of which I have. It is one thing for one random night of the year to generate one legendary live album. But when two concerts on the same night in the same city create two legendary live albums...one official, one unofficial...then, that is some music history. To top it all off, both bands and up jamming together at the end of the night.

Fairport Convention was beginning a three-night stand at the Troubadour Club...Friday-Saturday-Sunday Sept. 4-6. They were professionally recording all three nights for a prospective live album. Sandy Denny was gone. This was the "Full House" Fairport Convention lineup of Richard Thompson, Simon Nicol, Dave Swarbrick, Dave Pegg, and Dave Mattacks. Joe Boyd and John Wood were overseeing the recording of the gig. I think they were using gear from Wally Heider Recording Studios. The tapes recorded over the three nights were used to make the "House Full: Live at the Troubadour 1970" album. Released in the UK in 1974 and in the U.S. (with a different cover and slightly different songs) in 1986. This would prove to be the only live recording of the Richard Thompson era of Fairport Convention, as he would leave the band at the end of 1970 and join forces with his wife, Linda Thompson.

Meanwhile, a few miles south of the Troubadour Led Zeppelin was playing their concert at the Fabulous Forum of Inglewood. They were in the middle of their 1970 North American tour and had just become the first band to topple the Beatles from #1 in the Melody Maker Music Poll. Their new album Led Zeppelin III was still a month away from being released but they felt confident enough in the new material to play three or four new songs from the album on this tour, even though nobody in the audience had heard them before. Plus, they were still riding the jet trails of Led Zeppelin II, which had cemented and expanded their popularity by leaps and bounds.

By 1970, Los Angeles had become like a second home to Led Zeppelin. This was their sixth tour to come through Southern California. They loved playing here and some of their most inspired shows happened at the Fabulous Forum and other venues in the area. Maybe the charms of Miss Pamela and her friends had something to do with that?

Led Zeppelin did not professionally record this night at the Forum, apart from a soundboard from the mixing desk which has yet to see the light of day. Most likely buried deep in Jimmy Page's archives. But there were some intrepid audience members who recorded the concert secretly. One guy was known as Rubber Dubber. Another team were Ken Douglas and Dub Taylor, known as the TMOQ guys...Trademark of Quality. These were the guys who were also responsible for the Bob Dylan "Great White Wonder" and Rolling Stones "LiveR Than You'll Ever Be" bootleg albums.

Rubber Dubber released his tape on double vinyl under the title "Led Zeppelin Live at the LA Forum 9-4-70".Rubber Dubber's tape is slightly better sounding than Ken & Dub's tape...both teams used portable reel-to-reel recorders at the Forum...but it is woefully incomplete. It is missing the first half hour and chunks of "Whole Lotta Love" and the encores.
For this reason, it is Ken & Dub's bootleg album "Live on Blueberry Hill" that became the more famous bootleg. First released on double vinyl under the Blimp Records label, then shortly reissued under the Trademark of Quality label.

Both Rubber Dubber's and the TMOQ's bootleg albums were released mere weeks after the concert and before Led Zeppelin III was even released. Which is why "Immigrant Song" was titled "From the Midnight Sun" on the bootleg...nobody knew what the song was yet. "Live on Blueberry Hill", along with the earlier Dylan and Stones bootlegs, confirmed there was a sizeable bootleg market for certain bands. The bootleg industry took off from that point.

Led Zeppelin played Fats Domino's "Blueberry Hill" as the final encore. They also threw in a rare performance of "Out on the Tiles" (one of only two known in existence) and some other special treats that night at the Forum. So far, there are no less than six different audience source tapes of Led Zeppelin's concert at the Forum September 4, 1970. Each of varying length and quality, but taken together we now the complete concert available with the songs in proper order.

After Led Zeppelin finished their 2 and 1/2 hour concert, they zoomed up to the Troubadour Club. If you had been standing outside of Pink's Hotdog stand on LaBrea Ave. that night around midnight you would have seen Led Zeppelin's limousines heading north up LaBrea before they turned left on Santa Monica Blvd. to the Troubadour Club. It was no secret that Led Zeppelin loved Fairport Convention. They arrived around the end of Fairport Convention's second set. Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Bonham eventually joined Fairport onstage for some songs and jams. The tapes were all rolling. "Morning Dew" and "Hey Joe" and "Mystery Train" have been mentioned as some of the songs played. Richard Thompson tried to teach Jimmy some jigs and reels. Dave Mattacks said his drums looked like they'd been through a hurricane after John Bonham got through with them.

Okay, so where are the tapes to this jam session? Dave Mattacks, Robert, Jimmy, Joe Boyd, John Wood, everyone confirms the jam session at the Troubadour happened and the tapes were recording but nobody seems to know or be willing to confess where the tapes are located. I  have read Joe Boyd says he has them but fears the Ghost of Peter Grant....which doesn't make sense in this day and age of youtube and internet. Peter Grant is long gone. Another time Joe Boyd mentioned the tapes were stored at Universal. Well, this could be a problem. Because a huge fire ripped through the Universal archives a few years ago. It could be those tapes were destroyed in the fire. That would be ghastly news for Fairport Convention and Led Zeppelin fans...the Troubadour tapes are one of the Holy Grails.

One last note about this night of September 4, 1970...after the jam session was over, John Bonham, Dave Mattacks, and Janis Joplin drank the night away at Barney's Beanery on Santa Monica Blvd. in West Hollywood.

118692299_3098100693749684_9157752493452119430_n.jpg.adfff9a16697fe2fede91b943aa627d8.jpg118793752_3098100803749673_3341474033965241991_n.jpg.6bb4a96c1c2f813f4e958d159936c19c.jpg

Edited by Strider

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The original vinyl bootlegs of September 4, 1970 L.A. Forum were chopped up and songs out of order. Thankfully, with the mix of different sources we now have the fullest and most complete version of that famous night...with the songs in their proper order and most of Robert Plant's Plantations restored. This might be the best version yet of this concert. Happy 50th Birthday Blueberry Hill!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great show!  Just finished listening again! My first Zeppelin bootleg in about 1977, still a favorite!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And just when I thought there would be no 50th anniversary thread today... Strider saves the day!!

September 4th is a sentimental day for me... not to mention arguably the most important date of my entire existence.

To name a few milestones:

1987 - My parents met each other at a dancehall while in college.

1981 - George Strait (the first singer I called my favorite) released his first album.

1972 - The Price is Right (one of my favorite shows ever) premiered on CBS.

And of course one of the most famous nights in Led Zeppelin history.

But today didn't start off as a great day for me. These have been hard times financially for me and some expensive bills had to get paid today. It was also a stressful day at work. Nonetheless, I didn't let it put a damper on my night because I had a Led Zeppelin concert to attend!

So after work, I picked up some tacos, cracked open a beer, and smoked a Lucky Strike I had been saving. At about 9:15 (the time I imagine Zeppelin would be hitting the stage) I put the concert on and let it play in real time. Tonight is Friday just like it was in 1970, and I felt all the vibes. Friday evening is one of the only times during the week that I will unapologetically play music loud over my stereo system, and the Nite Owl matrix sounded great coming through my speakers!

Even though this bootleg is most associated with first-generation fans and was their first live exposure to Zep, it had an influential effect on a more recent fan like me too. The first live exposure I had to the band was TSRTS, but it took me a while to "get" what the concept of Live Zeppelin really was. This show was one of the earliest bootlegs I listened to on YouTube and that's when I started to get it... these guys like to have fun! The one thing that stood out to me was the medley improvisations at the end of the show. I had never heard any band jam like that with such precision and spontaneity.

From the first time I heard this show until now, Communication Breakdown alone is worth the price of admission. Throughout most the show tonight, I had my volume a bit conservative because I knew my neighbors were home (two full hours of the mighty Zep is a bit much at full blast), but when Blueberry Hill started up and I knew this was the end... I cranked it up! What a way to end a show!

While there may technically be better shows from this tour, this one is my sentimental favorite... and rivals the likes of Osaka 9/29 and Belfast 3/5 as my favorite show ever. It's also a good way of introducing Led Zep Boots to other fans; it's got great sound quality with no need for bootleg ears, and is just 2 hours and 14 minutes of pure and alive rock! 

To quote the guy at very end... what can I say!

 

P.S. I don't have any Zeppelin bootlegs on vinyl, and I told myself last year on this day that I would have a vinyl copy of Blueberry Hill by the 50th anniversary.

Well... I almost made it.

Copies of this boot typically go for $200+, and none of the record stores I shop at ever have any bootlegs. But just when I had written off getting one by the 50th, I snagged one on eBay for just over $100 (priorities right). It's in the mail as I'm typing this and I should have it in hand early next week. 

It happens to be a 1971 Del Pez pressing; which is arguably the best visual presentation of the bootleg you can get on vinyl. It features the iconic TMOQ cover, track listing, and really nice labels. Can't wait to see how it sounds!

Edited by William Austin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, William Austin said:

And just when I thought there would be no 50th anniversary thread today... Strider saves the day!!

September 4th is a sentimental day for me... not to mention arguably the most important date of my entire existence.

To name a few milestones:

1987 - My parents met each other at a dancehall while in college.

1981 - George Strait (the first singer I called my favorite) released his first album.

1972 - The Price is Right (one of my favorite shows ever) premiered on CBS.

And of course one of the most famous nights in Led Zeppelin history.

But today didn't start off as a great day for me. These have been hard times financially for me and some expensive bills had to get paid today. It was also a stressful day at work. Nonetheless, I didn't let it put a damper on my night because I had a Led Zeppelin concert to attend!

So after work, I picked up some tacos, cracked open a beer, and smoked a Lucky Strike I had been saving. At about 9:15 (the time I imagine Zeppelin would be hitting the stage) I put the concert on and let it play in real time. Tonight is Friday just like it was in 1970, and I felt all the vibes. Friday evening is one of the only times during the week that I will unapologetically play music loud over my stereo system, and the Nite Owl matrix sounded great coming through my speakers!

Even though this bootleg is most associated with first-generation fans and was their first live exposure to Zep, it had an influential effect on a more recent fan like me too. The first live exposure I had to the band was TSRTS, but it took me a while to "get" what the concept of Live Zeppelin really was. This show was one of the earliest bootlegs I listened to on YouTube and that's when I started to get it... these guys like to have fun! The one thing that stood out to me was the medley improvisations at the end of the show. I had never heard any band jam like that with such precision and spontaneity.

From the first time I heard this show until now, Communication Breakdown alone is worth the price of admission. Throughout most the show tonight, I had my volume a bit conservative because I knew my neighbors were home (two full hours of the mighty Zep is a bit much at full blast), but when Blueberry Hill started up and I knew this was the end... I cranked it up! What a way to end a show!

While there may technically be better shows from this tour, this one is my sentimental favorite... and rivals the likes of Osaka 9/29 and Belfast 3/5 as my favorite show ever. It's also a good way of introducing Led Zep Boots to other fans; it's got great sound quality with no need for bootleg ears, and is just 2 hours and 14 minutes of pure and alive rock! 

To quote the guy at very end... what can I say!

 

P.S. I don't have any Zeppelin bootlegs on vinyl, and I told myself last year on this day that I would have a vinyl copy of Blueberry Hill by the 50th anniversary.

Well... I almost made it.

Copies of this boot typically go for $200+, and none of the record stores I shop at ever have any bootlegs. But just when I had written off getting one by the 50th, I snagged one on eBay for just over $100 (priorities right). It's in the mail as I'm typing this and I should have it in hand early next week. 

It happens to be a 1971 Del Pez pressing; which is arguably the best visual presentation of the bootleg you can get on vinyl. It features the iconic TMOQ cover, track listing, and really nice labels. Can't wait to see how it sounds!

Great story William Austin. Glad you were able to finally score a vinyl "Blueberry Hill".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, badgeholder said:

How cool would it be to have a photo of Bonzo drinking with Janis?

How about the fact that there doesn't seem to be any photos of Led Zeppelin with Fairport Convention at the Troubadour? Nobody had a camera or could be bothered to snap a photo? WTF?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Strider said:

118627776_3098100640416356_4329776859097228168_n.jpg.68e1c7655e4abd358dbdc3269084593d.jpg118798124_3098100517083035_1033456149432863210_n.jpg.3a3c5c48574f4334929a71651091111a.jpg2023419125_118703694_3098100743749679_705115694355598466_o(1).jpg.69df3c966984cbb4d3db83db50899471.jpg

Flashback Friday. 50 Years Gone. September 4, 1970. Los Angeles, California.These are a few of the albums that were spawned on this night in Los Angeles 50 years ago. All of which I have. It is one thing for one random night of the year to generate one legendary live album. But when two concerts on the same night in the same city create two legendary live albums...one official, one unofficial...then, that is some music history. To top it all off, both bands and up jamming together at the end of the night.

Fairport Convention was beginning a three-night stand at the Troubadour Club...Friday-Saturday-Sunday Sept. 4-6. They were professionally recording all three nights for a prospective live album. Sandy Denny was gone. This was the "Full House" Fairport Convention lineup of Richard Thompson, Simon Nicol, Dave Swarbrick, Dave Pegg, and Dave Mattacks. Joe Boyd and John Wood were overseeing the recording of the gig. I think they were using gear from Wally Heider Recording Studios. The tapes recorded over the three nights were used to make the "House Full: Live at the Troubadour 1970" album. Released in the UK in 1974 and in the U.S. (with a different cover and slightly different songs) in 1986. This would prove to be the only live recording of the Richard Thompson era of Fairport Convention, as he would leave the band at the end of 1970 and join forces with his wife, Linda Thompson.

Meanwhile, a few miles south of the Troubadour Led Zeppelin was playing their concert at the Fabulous Forum of Inglewood. They were in the middle of their 1970 North American tour and had just become the first band to topple the Beatles from #1 in the Melody Maker Music Poll. Their new album Led Zeppelin III was still a month away from being released but they felt confident enough in the new material to play three or four new songs from the album on this tour, even though nobody in the audience had heard them before. Plus, they were still riding the jet trails of Led Zeppelin II, which had cemented and expanded their popularity by leaps and bounds.

By 1970, Los Angeles had become like a second home to Led Zeppelin. This was their sixth tour to come through Southern California. They loved playing here and some of their most inspired shows happened at the Fabulous Forum and other venues in the area. Maybe the charms of Miss Pamela and her friends had something to do with that?

Led Zeppelin did not professionally record this night at the Forum, apart from a soundboard from the mixing desk which has yet to see the light of day. Most likely buried deep in Jimmy Page's archives. But there were some intrepid audience members who recorded the concert secretly. One guy was known as Rubber Dubber. Another team were Ken Douglas and Dub Taylor, known as the TMOQ guys...Trademark of Quality. These were the guys who were also responsible for the Bob Dylan "Great White Wonder" and Rolling Stones "LiveR Than You'll Ever Be" bootleg albums.

Rubber Dubber released his tape on double vinyl under the title "Led Zeppelin Live at the LA Forum 9-4-70".Rubber Dubber's tape is slightly better sounding than Ken & Dub's tape...both teams used portable reel-to-reel recorders at the Forum...but it is woefully incomplete. It is missing the first half hour and chunks of "Whole Lotta Love" and the encores.
For this reason, it is Ken & Dub's bootleg album "Live on Blueberry Hill" that became the more famous bootleg. First released on double vinyl under the Blimp Records label, then shortly reissued under the Trademark of Quality label.

Both Rubber Dubber's and the TMOQ's bootleg albums were released mere weeks after the concert and before Led Zeppelin III was even released. Which is why "Immigrant Song" was titled "From the Midnight Sun" on the bootleg...nobody knew what the song was yet. "Live on Blueberry Hill", along with the earlier Dylan and Stones bootlegs, confirmed there was a sizeable bootleg market for certain bands. The bootleg industry took off from that point.

Led Zeppelin played Fats Domino's "Blueberry Hill" as the final encore. They also threw in a rare performance of "Out on the Tiles" (one of only two known in existence) and some other special treats that night at the Forum. So far, there are no less than six different audience source tapes of Led Zeppelin's concert at the Forum September 4, 1970. Each of varying length and quality, but taken together we now the complete concert available with the songs in proper order.

After Led Zeppelin finished their 2 and 1/2 hour concert, they zoomed up to the Troubadour Club. If you had been standing outside of Pink's Hotdog stand on LaBrea Ave. that night around midnight you would have seen Led Zeppelin's limousines heading north up LaBrea before they turned left on Santa Monica Blvd. to the Troubadour Club. It was no secret that Led Zeppelin loved Fairport Convention. They arrived around the end of Fairport Convention's second set. Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Bonham eventually joined Fairport onstage for some songs and jams. The tapes were all rolling. "Morning Dew" and "Hey Joe" and "Mystery Train" have been mentioned as some of the songs played. Richard Thompson tried to teach Jimmy some jigs and reels. Dave Mattacks said his drums looked like they'd been through a hurricane after John Bonham got through with them.

Okay, so where are the tapes to this jam session? Dave Mattacks, Robert, Jimmy, Joe Boyd, John Wood, everyone confirms the jam session at the Troubadour happened and the tapes were recording but nobody seems to know or be willing to confess where the tapes are located. I  have read Joe Boyd says he has them but fears the Ghost of Peter Grant....which doesn't make sense in this day and age of youtube and internet. Peter Grant is long gone. Another time Joe Boyd mentioned the tapes were stored at Universal. Well, this could be a problem. Because a huge fire ripped through the Universal archives a few years ago. It could be those tapes were destroyed in the fire. That would be ghastly news for Fairport Convention and Led Zeppelin fans...the Troubadour tapes are one of the Holy Grails.

One last note about this night of September 4, 1970...after the jam session was over, John Bonham, Dave Mattacks, and Janis Joplin drank the night away at Barney's Beanery on Santa Monica Blvd. in West Hollywood.

118692299_3098100693749684_9157752493452119430_n.jpg.adfff9a16697fe2fede91b943aa627d8.jpg118793752_3098100803749673_3341474033965241991_n.jpg.6bb4a96c1c2f813f4e958d159936c19c.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Strider: Great, compelling writing about a monumental concert and, as you point out, a significant show for the burgeoning boot industry.  If it's true that the Fairport Troub pro-tapes from that jam session were stored at Universal, well, that just compounds that tragedy, because we already know too many specifics about what's been confirmed destroyed. That loss is going to hurt for decades to come, music-wise... As far as Blueberry Hill recordings,  I can't say I've enjoyed any version of the show in the last 35 years as much as Nite Owl's recent matrix, but I'd like to get ahold of a "first edition" Blimp or Rubber Dubber vinyl, just for the historical beauty of it. I'm sure there's one available somewhere--and I'm sure I can't afford it right now. Finally, very poignant indeed if Janis and Bonzo partied at Barney's on Sept. 4, '70---she died just a few blocks away exactly one month later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Strider said:

Rubber Dubber released his tape on double vinyl under the title "Led Zeppelin Live at the LA Forum 9-4-70".Rubber Dubber's tape is slightly better sounding than Ken & Dub's tape...both teams used portable reel-to-reel recorders at the Forum...but it is woefully incomplete. It is missing the first half hour and chunks of "Whole Lotta Love" and the encores.

Hi Strider:) Good stuff as always. . Got a question about first editions of R.D.  So in missing the first half hour, R.D. originals are missing IS, HB, and DAC (roughly a half hour into the show) and TTW as well?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent read, thanks Strider and great work. Can someone point me to the night owl matrix please????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, rm2551 said:

Excellent read, thanks Strider and great work. Can someone point me to the night owl matrix please????

Its been selling on Ebay for awhile now and that's where I found mine, good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:goodpost: Seeing this post this past Friday got me to immediately pull my vinyl out of this excellent show and listen! 50 years gone, wow!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, High-hopes Hailla said:

Strider: Great, compelling writing about a monumental concert and, as you point out, a significant show for the burgeoning boot industry.  If it's true that the Fairport Troub pro-tapes from that jam session were stored at Universal, well, that just compounds that tragedy, because we already know too many specifics about what's been confirmed destroyed. That loss is going to hurt for decades to come, music-wise... As far as Blueberry Hill recordings,  I can't say I've enjoyed any version of the show in the last 35 years as much as Nite Owl's recent matrix, but I'd like to get ahold of a "first edition" Blimp or Rubber Dubber vinyl, just for the historical beauty of it. I'm sure there's one available somewhere--and I'm sure I can't afford it right now. Finally, very poignant indeed if Janis and Bonzo partied at Barney's on Sept. 4, '70---she died just a few blocks away exactly one month later.

And Jimi Hendrix would pass on a couple weeks later, too. 😢

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see in the picture here a blue label for the Blimp Record Blueberry Hill. I remember mine as having a red label. Any idea if there was more than one pressing, or label variations?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...