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They went beyond printed source material and actually consulted individuals, but I can't say for certain whom

said it was 1963 and if they substantiated it.

It's generally accepted he enrolled in art college after having left Neil Christian and The Crusaders, which I believe is closer to September 1960. Without repeating much of what has been said in this thread already,

Jimmy usually says he attended college "for about 18 months" but evidence has come to light thru the years

that suggests he may have taken at least one extended break from his studies and then returned, so this

could mean 18 months in total as opposed to consecutively.

Albert Lee said he met Jimmy in '61, and they would go to each others homes to listen to records. He said Jimmy developed an affinity for his (Albert's) sound (Gibson Les Paul Custom with Supro Amp) and bought a Supro of his own that year. I show Jimmy dropped out of college in '62 to become a studio musician and have also confirmed a number of session dates in early '63.

So again, I think he started circa Sept 60 and went for about 18 months in total, dropping out in '62. However,

this is not confirmed beyond a reasonable doubt (yet).

I still think he enrolled in autumn 1962 and quit at the end of 1963 (or close). I think we need to dedicate a thread to this question, so that we can weigh all the different arguments. I'll make one soon and try to argue my case.

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I remember that day, Steve. Luckily you brought your camcorder! I am excited about the crooked vultures w/JPJ coming to Detroit in October. Tix on sale 9/3. ( I wonder who currently owns that RP autographed edition Cadillac...???? whoops..another Zep mystery!)

Hello, my friend. Yeah, we met that day. You walked over, I did a double take as you looked like Mitch Albom laugh.gif

I can't remember what was done with that Cadillac. Perhaps the hood was removed and displayed in the GM Headquarters building somewhere or the car was archived. I may contact their public relations department to find out. There are also some Cadillac forums I can search. I have searched in vain for the promotional poster produced for that event showing Robert wearing a Love t-shirt and standing in front of a vintage Cadillac. (On my video you can see Robert himself admiring it in the lobby and filming it with his camcorder. He also plants a kiss on this beautiful female fan who waited in line to see him. She looks like she is going to faint). I did see one of the posters on ebay a few months later but it had pinholes and creases so I passed thinking more would turn up. None have.

I don't think I'm going to make it to the Fillmore gig as I don't get back to the states much anymore.

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I still think he enrolled in autumn 1962 and quit at the end of 1963 (or close). I think we need to dedicate a thread to this question, so that we can weigh all the different arguments. I'll make one soon and try to argue my case.

It's generally accepted he left Neil Christian and The Crusaders circa September 1960. I suppose there was the

gigs he did with Royston Ellis and what not which would have kept him focused on music until Autumn '62, but

it's equally plausible he enrolled straight away, dropped out and reenrolled a second time. A separate thread may be best as this thread occasionally touches upon many unrelated topics relatively quickly.

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(What is the potential for the discovery of film from Led Zeppelin at Newport Jazz Festival Newport, Rhode Island on July 6, 1969?)

Digging Deep in the Vault

Published: August 31 2009 By Bill Milkowski

There is a whole complex myriad of procedures and problem-solving to undertake before sound files of classic rock, blues, folk and jazz performances ultimately get posted to the Wolfgang's Vault website. And whether the archival tapes come from the Fillmore West in San Francisco, the Ashgrove nightclub in Los Angeles or the Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island, the process remains the same.First, the tapes are retrieved from storage at Iron Mountain (in either the limestone caves in upstate New York or another holding facility in New Jersey) and brought to the Manhattan headquarters of Wolfgang's Vault, where digital conversion and mastering takes place. In the case of the recent acquisition of the entire Newport Jazz Festival audio and video archives (spanning from 1954 to 1976), that means nearly 5,000 pieces shipped by truck on shrink-wrapped carts from New Jersey across the Hudson River to their new home at 7th Avenue and 29th Street. "They shrink wrap all the tapes to protect them for jostling on the trip and, more importantly, from humidity, which is the big enemy of magnetic tape," says Peter Lockhart, who is overseeing the Newport Jazz Festival project at Wolfgang's Vault.

The tapes are then placed on several shelves in a humidity-controlled room on the fifth floor where the temperature remains a constant 68 degrees. Generally, with archival projects like this one, tapes often have to be baked in expensive ovens at 125 degrees for 12 hours to preserve them. As Lockhart explains, "With older tapes, particularly those from the '70s and the '80s, the glue that binds the backing to the magnetic tape breaks down, which can cause the tape to stick to the heads on the machines so that they won't play. But because so many of these older Newport tapes from the '50s and '60s are acetate, we didn't have to bake them."

The next task is assessing the treasure trove of tapes to see what is actually there and what obstacles might be encountered during the digital transfer process. The sizes of the tapes range from 1/4" mono or stereo recordings to 1/2" 3-track and 4-track to 1" 8-track, all of varying speeds. "We have so many different formats, each with a different set of parameters from an archival standpoint and a transferring standpoint," says Lockhart. The digital conversion process is being done on Macintosh computers using Logic Pro and the analog recordings are being captured in 24 bit at 192K (a significant improvement in the quality of the digital conversion process from the King Biscuit Flower Hour radio archives, which was done two years ago at 24 bit at 96K). "The whole idea of it is to make as accurate a transfer as possible, to take those gorgeous analog recordings and transfer them to digital without losing the color and dynamics of the original," says Lockhart.

Up on the ninth floor, a busy crew of eight audio engineers begin meticulously converting the reel-to-reel analog tapes to digital. At this point, very little may be known about what is actually on each tape. Some years of the Newport Jazz Festival have more detailed information on the tape boxes than others. Generally, the main artist is listed on the outside of the box. Occasionally, sidemen may be listed along with the headliner, and there may even be some incidental information about song titles. Each individual tape is its own unique mystery, presenting something of a puzzle to solve. With keen ears and a certain amount of sleuthing (including trips to the Performing Arts Library at Lincoln Center to look up old issues of Down Beat on the microfilm machines to read reviews of the Newport Jazz Festivals from yesteryear), the song titles and personnel are determined. At that point, the music is ready for mastering, one of the final steps in the process. Each individual artist is given a designated spot on the Wolfgang's Vault website, and those performances at the Newport Jazz Festival are then duly annotated on the site by Bill Milkowski, a veteran jazz journalist and longtime contributor to Jazz Times magazine as well as the author of "Rockers, Jazzbos & Visionaries" (Billboard Books) and "JACO: The Extraordinary and Tragic Life of Jaco Pastorius" (Backbeat Books).

"We're going to transfer everything," say Lockhart of the recent treasure trove of tapes to arrive at Wolfgang's Vault. "Everything is going to get preserved and digitized. And as the process goes on, we're learning more and more about exactly what we have in the archives. And some very interesting things are coming to light."

Along with recordings from the Newport Jazz Festival, the archives also includes tapes from other George Wein's enterprises such as the Longhorn Jazz Festival (a short-lived festival held in Austin during the mid '60s), the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival (specifically from 1978), the Paris Jazz Festival (from 1960) and the Grande Parade du Jazz in Nice, France (from the early '60s).

Stay tuned. The first bits of music from the Newport Jazz Festival will be up this fall (beginning with 1955, George Wein's second annual clambake in Rhode Island).

Edited by SteveAJones
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It's generally accepted he left Neil Christian and The Crusaders circa September 1960. I suppose there was the

gigs he did with Royston Ellis and what not which would have kept him focused on music until Autumn '62, but

it's equally plausible he enrolled straight away, dropped out and reenrolled a second time. A separate thread may be best as this thread occasionally touches upon many unrelated topics relatively quickly.

What kind of music were you playing with (early English rock band) Neil Christian And The Crusaders?

JP: This was before the Stones happened, so we were doing Chuck Berry, Gene Vincent, and Bo Diddley things mainly. At the time, public taste was more engineered towards Top 10 records, so it was a bit of a struggle. But there’d always be a small section of the audience into what we were doing.

Wasn’t there a break in your music career at this point?

JP: Yes, I stopped playing and went to art college for about two years, while concentrating more on blues playing on my own. And then from art college to the (early British rock mecca) Marquee Club in London. I used to go up and jam on a Thursday night with the interlude band. One night somebody said, “Would you like to play on a record?” and I said, “Yeah, why not.” It did quite well, and that was it after that. I can’t remember the title of it now. From that point I started getting all this studio work. There was a crossroads: is it an art career or is it going to be music? Well anyway, I had to stop going to the art college because I was really getting into music. Big Jim Sullivan—who was really brilliant—and I were the only guitarists doing those sessions. Then a point came where Stax Records (Memphis-based rhythm and blues label) started influencing music to have more brass and orchestral stuff. The guitar started to take a back trend with just the occasional riff. I didn’t realize how rusty I was going to get until a rock and roll session turned up from France, and I could hardly play. I thought it was time to get out, and I did.

You just stopped playing?

JP: For a while I just worked on my stuff alone, and then I went to a Yardbirds concert at Oxford, and they were all walking around in their penguin suits. (Lead singer) Keith Relf got really drunk and was saying “Fuck you” right in the mike and falling into the drums. I thought it was a great anarchistic night, and I went back into the dressing room and said, “What a brilliant show!” There was this great argument going on; (bass player) Paul Samwell-Smith saying, “Well, I’m leaving the group, and if I was you, Keith, I’d do the very same thing.” So he left the group, and Keith didn’t. But they were stuck, you see, because they had commitments and dates, so I said, “I’ll play the bass if you like.”

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Going To See The King

On May 11, 1974, Led Zeppelin (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant and John Bonham) attended Elvis Presley's evening concert at the Los Angeles Forum. During the concert, Elvis stopped a song and jokingly said: 'Wait a minute... If we can start together fellas, because we've got Led Zeppelin out there... let's try to look like we know what we're doing, whether we do or not'.

Their mutual promoter at the time, Jerry Weintraub, took Jimmy Page and Robert Plant up to Presley's hotel suite. For the first few minutes, Elvis ignored them.

Jimmy Page—who had first picked up a guitar after hearing 'Baby Let's Play House' on overseas radio—began to fidget. What was going on? Did he really want to meet them? Should they say something? Elvis finally turned to them. 'Is it true', he said, 'these stories about you boys on the road?' Plant answered, 'Of course not. We're family men. I get the most pleasure out of walking the hotel corridors, singing your songs'. Plant offered his best Elvis impersonation. 'Treat me like a fool, treat me mean and cruuuuel, but looooove me...'. For a moment Elvis Presley eyed them both very carefully. Then he burst out laughing. Then his bodyguards burst out laughing. For two hours he entertained them in his suite. He had never heard their records, he said, except for when his stepbrother played him 'Stairway to Heaven'. 'I liked it', said Presley. Later, walking down the hallway from the hotel room, Page and Plant congratulated themselves on a two-hour meeting with the King. 'Hey', came a voice from behind them. Presley had poked his head out the door. 'Treat me like fooool...'.

ELVISledzep.jpg

Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, May 11th 1974

The group's bassist, John Paul Jones did not attend the concert and had never to this point met Elvis. Richard Cole, the band's manager, organised another meeting via Jerry Schilling.

Elvis said it would be okay for them to come by the house.

Jerry Schilling was there on the night of the planned meeting and was 'a little surprised to see that Elvis was in pajamas and robe - he and Sheila Ryan (appears on front cover, Oct '73 issue of Playboy magazine) were getting ready to go upstairs. Jerry reminded Elvis that Richard and John were coming and Elvis remained downstairs to wait for them.

The following excerpt is from the book, Me And A Guy Named Elvis.

From the moment Richard stepped into the house, he was loud and profane, packing an amazing number of f-words into everything he said. 'You know', Elvis said to him. 'I'd appreciate it if you'd watch your language in front of my lady'. Things got very quiet. Everybody sat down and it stayed quiet. Then Elvis decided to break the ice, and asked if he could see the fancy watch that Richard was wearing. Richard handed the watch over, and when Elvis put it on, Richard quickly said that if Elvis wanted the watch, he could keep it.

'Does it have any special meaning to you?' Elvis asked.

'Well, a bit. Atlantic Records gave them to the group', said Richard.

'OK, thanks', said Elvis.

I don't know if Richard expected to lose his watch that easily, but about twenty minutes later Elvis went upstairs and came back down with another watch, a real piece of jewelry, covered in diamonds - a wristwatch you could trade in for a car. Maybe a couple of cars. 'Here', he said to Richard. 'Take this one'. A very stunned Richard accepted. From then on the night was nothing but fun, with a lot of laughs and a lot of quoting Monty Python routines (Elvis was the first Monty Python fanatic I ever knew). Elvis and Richard obviously shared a sense of humor. And I could tell Elvis also liked the much quieter John. At one point, Elvis excused himself, went back upstairs, and retuned with an equally impressive watch for the bassist. Before the evening was over, Elvis said he wanted to make another exchange. He was out of watches, but had another bit of fashion in mind. So he stood, eyed John, and said, 'Let's swap pants', while simultaneously, in expert Python fashion, letting his pajama bottoms drop beneath his robe. The loud Richard was shocked into silence, while quiet Sheila and John burst out laughing. Nobody accepted Elvis' offer, but it was a great note to end the night on.

The concert they attended was released some time ago on the Elvis Live In L.A. Book & CD Set:

ELVISbook_live_in_la.jpg

Live in L.A. features more than 200 photos of Elvis at his various Los Angeles shows. The main focus is on the evening concert at Inglewood Forum May 11, 1974. The CD is an informal 'soundboard' recording of that particular show with a few songs from other shows.

Includes about 20 photos of Elvis live in the 50s in L.A.

Track List: 1. Also Sprach Zarathustra ; 2. See See Rider ; 3. I Got A Woman / Amen ; 4. Love Me ; 5. Trying To Get To You ; 6. All Shook Up ; 7. Teddy Bear / Don't Be Cruel ; 8. Love Me Tender ; 9. Steamroller Blues ; 10. Hound Dog ; 11. Fever ; 12. Polk Salad Annie ; 13. Why Me Lord ; 14. Suspicious Minds ; 15. Introductions ; 16. I Can't Stop Loving You ; 17. Help Me ; 18. An American Trilogy ; 19. Let Me Be There ; 20. Funny How Time Slips Away ; 21. Big Boss Man ; 22. Can't Help Falling In Love ; Bonus Song: 23. You Can Have Her Tracks 1–20 recorded May 11th, 1974, evening show at Forum Of Inglewood, Los Angles, CA.

Tracks 21+22 recorded May 10th at Swing Auditorium, San Bernardino, CA.

Track 23 recorded May 11th, 1974, afternoon show at Forum Of Inglewood, Los Angles, CA.

This is a soundboard recording, except track 23, which is an audience recording.

ELVIS2.jpg

Joe Esposito (Presley's life-long friend and tour manager) wearing an orange 1975 Led Zeppelin Tour T-Shirt outside of Room 105 at the Holiday Inn hotel in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, 6:30pm on Sept 7, 1976. ELVIS3.jpg

Joe Esposito (Presley's life-long friend and tour manager) wearing an orange 1975 Led Zeppelin Tour T-Shirt outside of Room 105 at the Holiday Inn hotel in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, 6:30pm on Sept 7, 1976.

ELVISjoe_esposito_led_zeppelin_shir.jpg

Joe Esposito (Presley's life-long friend and tour manager) wearing an orange 1975 Led Zeppelin Tour T-Shirt outside of Room 105 at the Holiday Inn hotel in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, 6:30pm on Sept 7, 1976.

Edited by SteveAJones
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Going To See The King

On May 11, 1974, Led Zeppelin (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant and John Bonham) attended Elvis Presley's evening concert at the Los Angeles Forum. During the concert, Elvis stopped a song and jokingly said: 'Wait a minute... If we can start together fellas, because we've got Led Zeppelin out there... let's try to look like we know what we're doing, whether we do or not'.

Audio snippet from the show... B)

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Steve...we got to get these guys to come back...F a replacement for Robert. They are who they are.

Love you brother

by the way...the new improvements on the site rocks

The man performing electric magic behind the curtain deserves full credit for all the site improvements you see.

We may well see a Them Crooked Vultures dvd release to compliment their new album, otherwise all quiet on the Zep front...for now.

Thank you for your kind sentiments and cheers, Bouncer. beer.gif

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Hi Steve,

I just noticed something that I never really paid attention to before: 29 years ago today, Peter Grant announces the first run of dates for Led Zep The 80's Tour - Part 1. The dates and cities announced:

Montreal - October 17

Landover, Maryland (Washington, DC) - October 19, 20

Philadelphia - October 22

Landover, Maryland (Washington DC) - October 23

Richfield, Ohio (Cleveland)- October 26, 27

Detroit - October 29, 30

Buffalo - November 1

Philadelphia - November 3, 4

Pittsburgh - November 6, 7

St. Paul, Minnesota (Minneapolis)- November 9

Chicago - November 10, 12, 13, 15

Now, we know Robert's condition was no more than 30 days in America, and band touring policy at that time was 2 days on, then one day off. Peter's initial plan was to cover the East and Midwest (hence Part 1), then return to America in Spring 1981 to cover the South and West.

So here's my question/mystery: why wasn't New York included in these inital run of dates? I find this strange that their second home and one of their strongest US markets wasn't included in Part 1's itinerary. Most major cities of Peter's Part 1 strategy were covered (I suppose St. Louis and Indianapolis could have part of the East Coast/Midwest coverage), and certainly Peter made a nice effort to include the key cities that were aborted late in the 1977 US tour (Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia), but why not New York? Especially when they had two venue options in Madison Square Garden and Uniondale in Long Island. Feasibly, I thought that with this itinerary, they might have added New York right at the end of Chicago, as the last stop before flying back to England (although they could really only perform one or two dates if Robert was firm on the 30 day rule).

I guess they could have visited New York on Part 2, but given Peter's strategy, it seems more fitting for them to add to Part 1. What are your thoughts?

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Hi Steve,

I just noticed something that I never really paid attention to before: 29 years ago today, Peter Grant announces the first run of dates for Led Zep The 80's Tour - Part 1. The dates and cities announced:

Montreal - October 17

Landover, Maryland (Washington, DC) - October 19, 20

Philadelphia - October 22

Landover, Maryland (Washington DC) - October 23

Richfield, Ohio (Cleveland)- October 26, 27

Detroit - October 29, 30

Buffalo - November 1

Philadelphia - November 3, 4

Pittsburgh - November 6, 7

St. Paul, Minnesota (Minneapolis)- November 9

Chicago - November 10, 12, 13, 15

Now, we know Robert's condition was no more than 30 days in America, and band touring policy at that time was 2 days on, then one day off. Peter's initial plan was to cover the East and Midwest (hence Part 1), then return to America in Spring 1981 to cover the South and West.

So here's my question/mystery: why wasn't New York included in these inital run of dates? I find this strange that their second home and one of their strongest US markets wasn't included in Part 1's itinerary. Most major cities of Peter's Part 1 strategy were covered (I suppose St. Louis and Indianapolis could have part of the East Coast/Midwest coverage), and certainly Peter made a nice effort to include the key cities that were aborted late in the 1977 US tour (Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia), but why not New York? Especially when they had two venue options in Madison Square Garden and Uniondale in Long Island. Feasibly, I thought that with this itinerary, they might have added New York right at the end of Chicago, as the last stop before flying back to England (although they could really only perform one or two dates if Robert was firm on the 30 day rule).

I guess they could have visited New York on Part 2, but given Peter's strategy, it seems more fitting for them to add to Part 1. What are your thoughts?

I find this inquiry very interesting and I shall have to look into it further and post my findings. What does come immediately to mind is this tour was booked on just three months notice so venue availability may have been an issue (hockey and baseketball season underway as well as other events). There is the Buffalo, NY date. It could also be Peter Grant may have deliberately avoided the pressure of playing the Big Apple on this initial leg, and

more so if they had intentions to return to NYC in 1981.

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I remember on the day John Bonham died, one of the NY area rock radio stations said (and which one I don't remember since there were several that I used to listen to from Long Island, NYC & Connecticut) that Led Zeppelin were just about to announce several dates at MSG. However, I have never seen anything about this in print, so who knows where that info came from & whether or not it was legit. Maybe this could be confirmed with one of the area promoters of that time.

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I still think he enrolled in autumn 1962 and quit at the end of 1963 (or close). I think we need to dedicate a thread to this question, so that we can weigh all the different arguments. I'll make one soon and try to argue my case.

Hi-

I am reading a book called "The First Time We Met the Blues", by David Williams, who is a childhood friend of Page.

Williams recounts attending an "American Folk-Blues Festival" in Manchester September of 1962 with some friends, including Page, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Brian Jones. Williams states that Page had to take the train and meet them there as he had a gig with Neil Christian the night before. He also states that Page subsequently left Christian's band and started art school. It's not clear if this was in late 1962 or early 1963.

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I remember on the day John Bonham died, one of the NY area rock radio stations said (and which one I don't remember since there were several that I used to listen to from Long Island, NYC & Connecticut) that Led Zeppelin were just about to announce several dates at MSG. However, I have never seen anything about this in print, so who knows where that info came from & whether or not it was legit. Maybe this could be confirmed with one of the area promoters of that time.

If that was said I would say it's inconsistent with what is known to be true of their intentions at the time. The first leg of the tour (Oct 17 - 15 Nov) was announced and it met Robert's pre-condition of not exceeding thirty days. If what the radio station reported is accurate then it would seem to suggest Robert relented on his pre-condition for the tour.

Edited by SteveAJones
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Hi-

I am reading a book called "The First Time We Met the Blues", by David Williams, who is a childhood friend of Page.

Williams recounts attending an "American Folk-Blues Festival" in Manchester September of 1962 with some friends, including Page, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Brian Jones. Williams states that Page had to take the train and meet them there as he had a gig with Neil Christian the night before. He also states that Page subsequently left Christian's band and started art school. It's not clear if this was in late 1962 or early 1963.

Thank you so much for posting this, Janet. I have not read the book you referenced but will make a point of doing so. I will also look into the American Folk-Blues Festival appearance and then set about incorporating

it into the existing chronology. What do you think about all this, Otto?

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Hi Steve! :wave:

I thought I'd bump up some of my old questions to see if you found any additional information. I apologize in advance if I missed the replies to any of them. Plus, I added a couple of new ones. :)

Older Questions:

1.) When Robert Plant went on SNL with Brian Setzer there's a sign behind the left side of the drummer stating "band for hire". Would you happen to know if that was Robert's idea? The sign stated to contact Ahmet with a phone number. Obviously, the phone number couldn't have been legit and went to a regular switchboard (at least I'm guessing).

2.) The 1970 soundtrack to the movie Homer has Led Zeppelin's How Many More Times. I know the band is protective of their work but did the boys and Peter authorize this usage?

3.) Has it been confirmed by Robert (or any member of the band) that Hot Dog was written about the Texas groupie Audrey Hamilton?

4.) Did any other of John Bonham's bulls besides Bruno win certificates?

5.) Regarding publishing companies usually the band utilized Superhype Publishing Inc. and Flames of Albion Music Inc. However for Physical Graffiti it states that all songs were published under Joaneline Music Inc. Do you have any information regarding Joaneline Music Inc.? I know you stated that the corporate offices for Joaneline Music are (were?) 33-34 CHANCERY LANE in LONDON.

6.) I remember hearing an interview on June 7th 1991 on my way to a Billy Squier concert at the now defunct Sting nightclub in New Britain Connecticut and listening to a radio interview with Billy. If I recall correctly there was actually talk of Billy collaborating with Jimmy Page, but Billy was touring to support his then latest release Creatures of Habit and the talks fell through. Do you have any additional information regarding this? In addition, unless I'm mistaken Billy actually mentioned this in a second interview he conducted.

7.) Following up on the recent sale of a Jimmy Page used bow, can you confirm if Jimmy only utilized Czechoslovakia A. Prager bows or did he utilize various manufactured bows?

8.) Back in April 2009 in this thread there was discussion about a necklace Jimmy is seen wearing, and was curious. Didn't Chris Farlowe own / or still own a WWII memorabilia store? If so, when did Chris open / purchase the store? Perhaps some of Jimmy's articles of clothing / jewelry was purchased from Chris' store?

9.)Can you confirm that one of the proposed titles for The Firm's debut album was "The Royal Court Of China?"

10.)Can you confirm that Simon Kirke was in the passenger seat when Bonzo was pulled over for speeding down Sunset? The story was told by JPJ in the '90's?

11.)When Led Zeppelin was able to meet Elvis, Paul Rodgers was also at the concert and attempted to meet with Elvis. Did Peter or Clive ever explain why Paul couldn't also get backstage to meet with Elvis?

Here's some newer questions for you Steve!

12.)Regarding Kashmir and the ghost track of the orchestra parts. Has there been any informaiton regarding the names of session players for the left over ghost track that remains? Is the handwritten sheet music put together by JPJ that was dated November 10, 1976 been located since it's sale? Any idea who Chris was who drew up that sheet music?

13.)The early Led Zep postcard that was for sale years ago through Merit Adventures that was signed by JP and RP (the one with the picture of them on stage in June 1969) do you know if that could have been part of possibly an early fan club offering? The suggestion that JP and RP signed "a whole bunch" has me curious as to why "a whole bunch" were signed.

14.)If true at one time they were in Swan Song's possession has it ever been stated where the demos from Iron Maiden that were found in a filing cabinet went when the Swan Song offices were cleared out in 1983? Do you know if the band The Message had any demos at the Swan Song offices?

Thanks as always for any insight you can provide regarding the questions!

Robert

www.behindthetoys.com

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Hi Steve! wave.gif

I thought I'd bump up some of my old questions to see if you found any additional information. I apologize in advance if I missed the replies to any of them. Plus, I added a couple of new ones. smile.gif

Older Questions:

1.) When Robert Plant went on SNL with Brian Setzer there's a sign behind the left side of the drummer stating "band for hire". Would you happen to know if that was Robert's idea? The sign stated to contact Ahmet with a phone number. Obviously, the phone number couldn't have been legit and went to a regular switchboard (at least I'm guessing).

2.) The 1970 soundtrack to the movie Homer has Led Zeppelin's How Many More Times. I know the band is protective of their work but did the boys and Peter authorize this usage?

3.) Has it been confirmed by Robert (or any member of the band) that Hot Dog was written about the Texas groupie Audrey Hamilton?

4.) Did any other of John Bonham's bulls besides Bruno win certificates?

5.) Regarding publishing companies usually the band utilized Superhype Publishing Inc. and Flames of Albion Music Inc. However for Physical Graffiti it states that all songs were published under Joaneline Music Inc. Do you have any information regarding Joaneline Music Inc.? I know you stated that the corporate offices for Joaneline Music are (were?) 33-34 CHANCERY LANE in LONDON.

6.) I remember hearing an interview on June 7th 1991 on my way to a Billy Squier concert at the now defunct Sting nightclub in New Britain Connecticut and listening to a radio interview with Billy. If I recall correctly there was actually talk of Billy collaborating with Jimmy Page, but Billy was touring to support his then latest release Creatures of Habit and the talks fell through. Do you have any additional information regarding this? In addition, unless I'm mistaken Billy actually mentioned this in a second interview he conducted.

7.) Following up on the recent sale of a Jimmy Page used bow, can you confirm if Jimmy only utilized Czechoslovakia A. Prager bows or did he utilize various manufactured bows?

8.) Back in April 2009 in this thread there was discussion about a necklace Jimmy is seen wearing, and was curious. Didn't Chris Farlowe own / or still own a WWII memorabilia store? If so, when did Chris open / purchase the store? Perhaps some of Jimmy's articles of clothing / jewelry was purchased from Chris' store?

9.)Can you confirm that one of the proposed titles for The Firm's debut album was "The Royal Court Of China?"

10.)Can you confirm that Simon Kirke was in the passenger seat when Bonzo was pulled over for speeding down Sunset? The story was told by JPJ in the '90's?

11.)When Led Zeppelin was able to meet Elvis, Paul Rodgers was also at the concert and attempted to meet with Elvis. Did Peter or Clive ever explain why Paul couldn't also get backstage to meet with Elvis?

Here's some newer questions for you Steve!

12.)Regarding Kashmir and the ghost track of the orchestra parts. Has there been any informaiton regarding the names of session players for the left over ghost track that remains? Is the handwritten sheet music put together by JPJ that was dated November 10, 1976 been located since it's sale? Any idea who Chris was who drew up that sheet music?

13.)The early Led Zep postcard that was for sale years ago through Merit Adventures that was signed by JP and RP (the one with the picture of them on stage in June 1969) do you know if that could have been part of possibly an early fan club offering? The suggestion that JP and RP signed "a whole bunch" has me curious as to why "a whole bunch" were signed.

14.)If true at one time they were in Swan Song's possession has it ever been stated where the demos from Iron Maiden that were found in a filing cabinet went when the Swan Song offices were cleared out in 1983? Do you know if the band The Message had any demos at the Swan Song offices?

Thanks as always for any insight you can provide regarding the questions!

Robert

www.behindthetoys.com

Great questions, all!

#8 we've confirmed Farlowe did own such a store but he started out selling from a table so to speak. No direct connection to Jimmy as of yet.

#6 - A friend of mine just met with Billy within the past two weeks but didn't know about this question and I didn't know about their meeting until afterward. laugh.gif I shall attempt to put it forward online.

#13 - Led Zeppelin never had an official fan club.

I'll be in touch via PM to get clarification on some of the finer points of what you have asked now and previously.

Edited by SteveAJones
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Hi Steve! :wave:

I thought I'd bump up some of my old questions to see if you found any additional information. I apologize in advance if I missed the replies to any of them. Plus, I added a couple of new ones. :)

Older Questions:

3.) Has it been confirmed by Robert (or any member of the band) that Hot Dog was written about the Texas groupie Audrey Hamilton?

On the old board there used to be an interview with JPJ and RP after the Knebworth concerts, during that interview Robert was discussing the individual tracks on ITTOD and stated the song was about Audrey. I'm not sure if that interview is still available on the forum at present. The interviewer was J.J. Jackson.

Robert

www.behindthetoys.com

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Sorry, my answer ended up in the quote box, guess I haven't figured out how to use the new features on the forum as of yet!

No worries. During the interview Robert explains each track on the album to J.J., and for Hot Dog he says "It owes everthing to" (Robert pauses, J.J. suggests "the state of Texas" to which Robert laughs and continues)

"yeah, the state of Texas and the state of some of the people in Texas".

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No worries. During the interview Robert explains each track on the album to J.J., and for Hot Dog he says "It owes everthing to" (Robert pauses, J.J. suggests "the state of Texas" to which Robert laughs and continues)

"yeah, the state of Texas and the state of some of the people in Texas".

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Sorry, again.... still having trouble with posting. Re: Robert's reply about Hotdog, I recall him specifically saying Audrey's name while imitating a Southern accent.

If so then it must be in a different source. I recall him saying something to the effect of Texas had the richest groupies - they would follow the Zep jet in their own jets.

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